The Book of Learning and Forgetting / Edition 1

The Book of Learning and Forgetting / Edition 1

4.3 3
by Frank Smith
     
 

ISBN-10: 080773750X

ISBN-13: 9780807737507

Pub. Date: 11/01/2002

Publisher: Teachers College Press

In this thought-provoking book, Frank Smith explains how schools and educational authorities systematically obstruct the powerful inherent learning abilities of children, creating handicaps that often persist through life. The author eloquently contrasts a false and fabricated "official theory" that learning is work (used to justify the external control of teacher's…  See more details below

Overview

In this thought-provoking book, Frank Smith explains how schools and educational authorities systematically obstruct the powerful inherent learning abilities of children, creating handicaps that often persist through life. The author eloquently contrasts a false and fabricated "official theory" that learning is work (used to justify the external control of teacher's and students through excessive regulation and massive testing) with a correct but officially suppressed "classic view" that learning is a social process that can occur naturally and continually through collaborative activities. This book will be crucial reading in a time when national authorities continue to blame teachers and students for alleged failures in education. It will help educators and parents to combat sterile attitudes toward teaching and learning and prevent current practices from doing further harm.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807737507
Publisher:
Teachers College Press
Publication date:
11/01/2002
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
393,623
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.36(d)

Table of Contents

Preface
IWhat's Going on Here?1
1A Tale of Two Visions3
IIThe Classic View of Learning and Forgetting7
2A Question of Identity9
3The Immensity of Children's Learning14
4Joining the Literacy Club25
5Learning Through Life30
IIIThe Official Theory of Learning and Forgetting41
6Undermining Traditional Wisdom43
7Fabricating a Theory of Learning49
8The Entry of the Testers60
9More Spoils of War66
10The Official Theory Goes On-line73
IVRepairing the Damage81
11Liberating Our Own Learning83
12Liberating Schools and Education90
Notes103
References121
Name Index127
Subject Index130
About the Author133

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The Book of Learning and Forgetting 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Robyn13 More than 1 year ago
I read this book for an education class. It is a little opinionated, but it brings up a lot of questions surrounding the way we educate children today, and tells why we shouldn't rely so heavily on testing and things of that nature. Good book for educators to use to question system and something to recommend to parents if you as an educator decide to change the system in your classroom to a more classical learning style.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The first time I read the name Frank Smith was in Lucy Calkins's The Art of Teaching Writing. She quoted him when mentioning 'the literacy club' and how important it is for our students to join it. This little book can be read in a couple of sit-down (or lay down) sessions and it reminds us about how we learn as human beings. True learning is effortless because we learn from the company we keep, the 'club' we join we because we see ourselves as belonging to that club. His facts and figures are amazing and his reminder that we must, as teachers, make our students internalize the idea that they are members of the reading and writing CLUB, is timely and important. I found this book stacked on a table at my local Barnes and Noble and only picked it up because I recognized the name of the author. I am glad I did.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It's quite simple, 'We learn from the company we keep.' Not from tests. Not from worksheets. We learn naturally. I am still a teacher after having read this book, but I am a much different one now.