The Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation

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by G. K. Beale
     
 

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This commentary series is established on the presupposition that the theological character of the New Testament documents calls for exegesis that is sensitive to theological themes as well as to the details of the historical, linguistic, and textual context. Such thorough exegetical work lies at the heart of these volumes, which contain detailed verse-by-verse

Overview

This commentary series is established on the presupposition that the theological character of the New Testament documents calls for exegesis that is sensitive to theological themes as well as to the details of the historical, linguistic, and textual context. Such thorough exegetical work lies at the heart of these volumes, which contain detailed verse-by-verse commentary preceded by general comments on each section and subsection of the text.

An important aim of the NIGTC authors is to interact with the wealth of significant New Testament research published in recent articles and monographs. In this connection the authors make their own scholarly contributions to the ongoing study of the biblical text.

The text on which these commentaries are based is the UBS Greek New Testament, edited by Kurt Aland and others. While engaging the major questions of text and interpretation at a scholarly level, the authors keep in mind the needs of the beginning student of Greek as well as the pastor or layperson who may have studied the language at some time but does not now use it on a regular basis.

Editorial Reviews

America
Beale...is a master not only of the biblical text but also of the secondary literature. His work will serve primarily as a reference commentary to be consulted when the reader wants a comprehensive and fair presentation of the evidence regarding a disputed point coupled with a clear line of argumentation and the author's own conclusion.... As an evangelical scholar he takes seriously the scholarship of other evangelicals, while also treating with equal seriousness the views of scholars coming from other interpretative perspectives. His work belongs alongside David Aune's three-volume commentary on Revelation as a reliable and up-to-date guide to the many literary, historical and theological problems encountered in reading Revelation.
Journal of Biblical Literature
"The culmination of over a decade of research of writing on the Apocalypse, Beale's work makes a significant contribution to our understanding of Revelation. While the reader may not necessarily agree on all points, the commentary will certainly provide considerable insight into John's often perplexing vision. In particular, Beale's grasp of the Greek grammar of Revelation is outstanding. Too few scholars today have the linguistic expertise to furnish the reader with such extensive and thoughtful notes.... Beale also provides the reader with a rich collection of intertextual references from the Hebrew Bible, rabbinic literature, Jewish apocalyptic, and early Christian texts.... Beale has written a truly important work that should be consulted as a reference by serious scholars of the Apocalypse."
The Bible Today
A massive and thorough commentary on Revelation....Takes its places as one of several important resources for interpreting this fascinating New Testament book.
Themelios
"Beale's commentary reflects the distillation of a lifetime of research and thinking on the book of Revelation.... Beale leaves virtually no stone unturned in his careful analysis of the text of Revelation, while interacting with a wide range of commentaries, monographs and articles in several different languages. This commentary is a work of impressive scholarship and the size lends itself primarily to use as a reference tool. However, Beale's work could also be useful to pastors and theological students.... Beale has provided a valuable service to scholars, pastors and students in providing a commentary that should remain a standard for some time to come. This long-awaited commentary was certainly worth waiting for."
Theology & Mission Currents in
Learned, detailed, and comprehensive.
Word & World
"As this millennium draws to its close, interest in the book of Revelation remains high, and Beale's encyclopedic commentary has a great deal to offer those who wish to probe its mysteries.... Those who want comprehensive coverage with summaries of recent scholarly discussion will appreciate Beale's contribution and find it to be a valuable tool for many years."
From the Publisher
America
“Beale . . . is a master not only of the biblical text but also of the secondary literature. His work will serve primarily as a reference commentary to be consulted when the reader wants a comprehensive and fair presentation of the evidence regarding a disputed point coupled with a clear line of argumentation and the author’s own conclusion. . . . A reliable guide to the many literary, historical, and theological problems encountered in reading Revelation.”

Interpretation
“A strong contribution to scholarship and a valuable resource for a more general audience. . . . Beale has performed a distinctive service. His bold positions are thoroughly argued. His erudition and depth of research are admirable. And he displays strong skills in historical reconstruction and exegesis. His treatment of John’s work with the Hebrew scriptures alone make his commentary worth consulting.”

Journal of Biblical Literature
“A significant contribution to our understanding of Revelation. . . . This commentary will certainly provide considerable insight into John’s often perplexing vision. In particular, Beale’s grasp of the Greek grammar of Revelation is outstanding. Too few scholars today have the linguistic expertise to furnish the reader with such extensive and thoughtful notes. . . . A truly important work that should be consulted as a reference by serious scholars of the Apocalypse.”

The Bible Today
“A massive and thorough commentary on Revelation. . . . Takes its place as one of several important resources for interpreting this fascinating New Testament book.”

Grant Osborne
— Trinity Evangelical Divinity Schools
“This is an incredibly learned study, a magisterial commentary on one of the most difficult books in the Bible. There has never been a deeper probing of the Old Testament allusions in the Apocalypse, nor a better presentation of the idealist interpretation. This work will be essential for all scholars and students of the book of Revelation for years to come.”

M. Eugene Boring
— Brite Divinity School, Texas Christian University“Beale has provided the academic community with an excellent contribution to the expanding library of reference works for interpreting the Apocalypse. . . . This volume will undoubtedly take its place as a standard work to be considered in responsible study of Revelation.”

Richard Bauckham
— University of St. Andrews
“This long-awaited commentary is a magnificent achievement and will be an invaluable guide and resource for all future study of Revelation. Beale’s particular emphasis on interpreting the text by reference to the Old Testament Scriptures and Jewish exegetical traditions is one that the text itself invites, while the orientation to theological reflection is also very welcome in a commentary on this profoundly theological text.”

J. P. M. Sweet
— Cambridge University
“Beale has an unrivaled knowledge of Revelation and its Jewish background. His work will be invaluable both to scholars and students who want a thorough treatment of the textual and critical problems and to pastors and laypeople who want to know what Revelation meant — and means — in its own terms.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802821744
Publisher:
Eerdmans, William B. Publishing Company
Publication date:
11/05/1998
Series:
New International Greek Testament Commentary Series
Pages:
1309
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.46(h) x 2.09(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Dr. Gregory K. Beale is Professor of New Testament and Biblical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia.

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Book of Revelation 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one for the scholar and research and not for the student. It has 1245 pages of small print. The author is somewhat verbose. There are many excursuses that deal with a topic in detail. The author uses Daniel a lot to relate to the book of Revelation, which is OK, but it leads him to get the indentity of the mighty angel in Ch 10 wrong. While the researcher will love this book the student or pastor will not find it very helpful unless they need to deal in detail with a topic for a sermon or dissertation. The theology student will find Osborne more accessible and he also cites Beale.