The Book of the Dead (Special Agent Pendergast Series #7) [NOOK Book]

Overview

An FBI agent, rotting away in a high-security prison for a murder he did not commit...
His brilliant, psychotic brother, about to perpetrate a horrific crime...
A young woman with an extrodinary past, on th edge of a violent breakdown...
An ancient Egyptian tomb with an enigmatic curse, about to be unveiled at a celebrity-studded New York ...
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The Book of the Dead (Special Agent Pendergast Series #7)

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Overview

An FBI agent, rotting away in a high-security prison for a murder he did not commit...
His brilliant, psychotic brother, about to perpetrate a horrific crime...
A young woman with an extrodinary past, on th edge of a violent breakdown...
An ancient Egyptian tomb with an enigmatic curse, about to be unveiled at a celebrity-studded New York gala...
Memento Mori
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
FBI agent Pendergast and his demonic brother, Diogenes, continue the savage tango begun in Dance of Death. Diogenes returns the stolen gem collection of the New York Museum of Natural History, but this hoard of priceless jewels has been reduced to mounds of powdery dust. To neutralize the bad PR, the museum reopens the Tomb of Senef, an ancient Egyptian temple that has remained behind closed doors since the 1930s. For Diogenes, however, the new exhibit only raises the ante of his psychotic sibling feud.
Publishers Weekly
Readers caught up in the two previous adventures of FBI agent Aloysius Pendergast, a modern-day Sherlock Holmes, will leap right into this audio conclusion of the three-part series by Preston and Childs. Smartly abridged, this concluding volume is read with a lively and literate excitement by veteran actor Auberjonois, who can capture a surly museum guard, a snooty curator and a shrewd villain (Aloysius's evil brother, Diogenes) in the flicker of a vocal cord, but who saves his most ironic tones for Aloysius himself. Even listeners who are new to the series will find lots of thrills and chuckles. Everything from priceless diamonds ground to dust to murder and bloody mayhem is treated with zestful underplaying by Auberjonois. But listeners who will probably most appreciate the extensive tying up of loose plot threads this time around are the ones who were there when those threads first began to unravel. Simultaneous release with the Warner hardcover (Reviews, Apr. 24). (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
VOYA - Joanna Morrison
Preston and Child here conclude-or do they? - their popular trilogy featuring FBI Agent Aloysius Pendergast's epic struggle with his brother Diogenes, who is undoubtedly a genius but also criminally insane. In his ongoing plan to ruin Aloysius, Diogenes has successfully framed him for murder, thus clearing the path for his artistic revenge on both Aloysius and the world at the site of New York's Museum of Natural History. Naturally peculiar things begin occurring around the new exhibit based on a lost Egyptian tomb, and the grand opening of the exhibit is foreshadowed by "accidents" resulting in madness and death. In the meantime, Aloysius' supporters, most notably Police Officer Vincent D'Agosta, work to extricate him from the bowels of the United States' most secure prison, while Diogenes targets Aloysius' beloved adopted daughter Constance, planning a degradation that will complete Diogenes' evil schemes. Whew! As in Preston and Child's previous Aloysius and Diogenes books, Brimstone (Warner, 2004) and Dance Of Death (2005), there is breathless action of both the physical and intellectual kind, a bit of the supernatural, and the added tension of both Diogenes and Aloysius being masters of disguise, a la Mission Impossible. Readers of the earlier Pendergast books will demand this concluding volume. Consider it a must for libraries who have already purchased the first two.
Library Journal
The combination of Preston and Child has produced one best-selling thriller after another and has created one of the most intriguing characters in contemporary fiction: FBI special agent Aloysius Pendergast. This honey-voiced, seemingly supernatural G-man has faced danger in past novels, but this time he truly seems to have been outsmarted by his diabolical brother, Diogenes. As the book opens (the third in an apparent trilogy), Aloysius is in solitary confinement in a maximum-security prison, Diogenes is plotting a heinous crime against New York's Museum of Natural History, and Aloysius's NYPD friend Vince D'Agosta is in danger of losing his job. When an anonymous donor contributes an incredible sum of money to the museum to enable it to open a long-lost Egyptian tomb buried in the basement, it seems like the perfect time to distract the public from a massive diamond theft from the museum. Master storyteller Scott Brick has read many Preston-Child novels and voices just the right amount of drama and excitement to maintain the incredibly high level of suspense. Highly recommended for every library.-Joseph L. Carlson, Allan Hancock Coll., Lompoc, CA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Brazenly convoluted, swift-going last title in the Pendergast trilogy (after Dance of Death, 2005) features FBI special agent Aloysius Pendergast in murderous rivalry with his brother Diogenes. The authors keep numerous pots boiling over at once: Agent Pendergast is locked away in solitary confinement at the escape-proof Herkmoor Federal Correctional Facility in upstate New York, apparently framed for serial murders, at the time that a mysterious package containing ground diamonds is dumped at the beleaguered New York Museum of Natural History. Caught trying to hide the fact that the diamond dust is what is left of the museum's priceless diamond collection stolen some time before, the museum powers-that-be decide to bring up an Egyptian tomb buried in its cellars as a public-relations stunt. Archaeologist Nora Kelly (whose husband, New York Times reporter William Smithback Jr., broke the diamond-grit story) is assigned to reassemble the Tomb of Senef and plan the sound-and-light show that will bedazzle big-name guests at the official opening. A suave Egyptologist from the British Museum, Adrian Wicherly, aids Kelly and discovers that the tomb's hieroglyphics contain a curse of insanity on whoever defiles it. In fact, a series of visitors to the tomb do fall prey to madness and murder, including Dr. Wicherly, as plans for the official opening proceed ominously. Meanwhile, martial-arts master Pendergast is sprung from torture and gang mayhem in a jail rescue by fellow FBI agent Vinnie D'Agosta, and others convinced of his innocence, and put on the trail of Diogenes, who still has not recovered from emotional damage suffered during childhood. Diogenes blames his older brother for his earlytrauma and manipulates to his purposes the family's naive young ward, Constance Greene, whose own Dickensian tale figured into the authors' previous novels. With Diogenes stalking Constance in Italy, and the New York mayor and his retinue locked in the tomb, this promises to be a really good show. Fast, punchy and relentlessly action-packed.
From the Publisher
James Gale's gravelly voice is ideal for the cinder-lunged Rebus, and he manages somehow to lubricate out some of the harshness for cleaner living characters. Meanwhile, Gale's accents are superb , as he handles a spectrum ranging from overweening English toffee-nose to malicious Edinburgh corner boy. All in all, this narration adds another degree of atmosphere to a novel that is already redolent of the city it sprang from.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780759516038
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/30/2006
  • Series: Special Agent Pendergast Series , #7
  • Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 12,313
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Douglas Preston
The thrillers of Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child "stand head and shoulders above their rivals" (Publishers Weekly). Preston and Child's Relic and The Cabinet of Curiosities were chosen by readers in a National Public Radio poll as being among the one hundred greatest thrillers ever written, and Relic was made into a number-one box office hit movie. They are coauthors of the famed Pendergast series and their recent novels include Fever Dream, Cold Vengeance, Two Graves, and Gideon's Corpse. Preston's acclaimed nonfiction book, The Monster of Florence, is being made into a movie starring George Clooney. Lincoln Child is a former book editor who has published five novels of his own, including the huge bestseller Deep Storm.
Readers can sign up for The Pendergast File, a monthly "strangely entertaining note" from the authors, at their website, www.PrestonChild.com. The authors welcome visitors to their alarmingly active Facebook page, where they post regularly.

Biography

Douglas Preston was born in 1956 in Cambridge, MA, was raised in nearby Wellesley (where, by his own admission, he and his brothers were the scourge of the neighborhood!), and graduated from Pomona College in California with a degree in English literature.

Preston's first job was as a writer for the American Museum of Natural History in New York -- an eight year stint that led to the publication of his first book, Dinosaurs in the Attic and introduced him to his future writing partner, Lincoln Child, then working as an editor at St. Martin's Press. The two men bonded, as they worked closely together on the book. As the project neared completion, Preston treated Child to a private midnight tour of the museum, an excursion that proved fateful. As Preston tells it, "...in the darkened Hall of Late Dinosaurs, under a looming T. Rex, Child turned to [me] and said: 'This would make the perfect setting for a thriller!'" Their first collaborative effort, Relic, would not be published until 1995, by which time Preston had picked up stakes and moved to Santa Fe to pursue a full-time writing career.

In addition to writing novels (The Codex, Tyrannosaur Canyon) and nonfiction books on the American Southwest (Cities of Gold, Ribbons of Time), Preston has collaborated with Lincoln Child on several post-Relic thrillers. While not strictly a series, the books share characters and events, and the stories all take place in the same universe. The authors refer to this phenomenon as "The Preston-Child Pangea."

Preston divides his time between New Mexico and Maine, while Child lives in New Jersey -- a situation that necessitates a lot of long-distance communication. But their partnership (facilitated by phone, fax, and email) is remarkably productive and thoroughly egalitarian: They shape their plots through a series of discussions; Child sends an outline of a set of chapters; Preston writes the first draft of those chapters, which is subsequently rewritten by Child; and in this way the novel is edited back and forth until both authors are happy. They attribute the relatively seamless surface of their books to the fact that "[a]ll four hands have found their way into practically every sentence, at one time or another."

In between, Preston remains busy. He is a regular contributor to magazines like National Geographic, The New Yorker, Natural History, Smithsonian, Harper's, and Travel & Leisure, and he continues with varied solo literary projects. Which is not to say his partnership with Lincoln Child is over. Fans of the bestselling Preston-Child thrillers can be assured there are bigger and better adventures to come.

Good To Know

Douglas Preston counts among his ancestors the poet Emily Dickinson, the newspaperman Horace Greeley, and the infamous murderer and opium addict Amasa Greenough.

His brother is Richard Preston, the bestselling author of The Hot Zone, The Cobra Event, The Wild Trees, and other novels and nonfiction narratives.

Preston is an expert horseman and a member of the Long Riders Guild.

He is also a National Geographic Society Fellow, has traveled extensively around the world, and contributes archaeological articles to many magazines.

In our interview, Preston shared some fun and fascinating personal anecdotes.

"My first job was washing dishes in the basement of a nursing home for $2.10 an hour, and I learned as much about the value of hard work there as I ever did later."

"I need to write in a small room -- the smaller the better. I can't write in a big room where someone might sneak up behind my back."

"My hobbies are mountain biking, horseback riding and packing, canoeing and kayaking, hiking, camping, cooking, and skiing."

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Read an Excerpt

The Book of the Dead


By Douglas Preston Lincoln Child

WARNER BOOKS

Copyright © 2006 Splendide Mendax, Inc., and Lincoln Child
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-446-57698-0


Chapter One

Early-morning sunlight gilded the cobbled drive of the staff entrance at the New York Museum of Natural History, illuminating a glass pillbox just outside the granite archway. Within the pillbox, a figure sat slumped in his chair: an elderly man, familiar to all museum staff. He puffed contentedly on a calabash pipe and basked in the warmth of one of those false-spring days that occur in New York City in February, the kind that coaxes daffodils, crocuses, and fruit trees into premature bloom, only to freeze them dead later in the month.

"Morning, doctor," Curly said again and again to any and all passersby, whether mailroom clerk or dean of science. Curators might rise and fall, directors might ascend through the ranks, reign in glory, then plummet to ignominious ruin; man might till the field and then lie beneath; but it seemed Curly would never be shifted from his pillbox. He was as much a fixture in the museum as the ultrasaurus that greeted visitors in the museum's Great Rotunda.

"Here, pops!"

Frowning at this familiarity, Curly roused himself in time to see a messenger shove a package through the window of his pillbox. The package had sufficient momentum to land on the little shelf where the guard kept his tobacco andmittens.

"Excuse me!" Curly said, rousing himself and waving out the window. "Hey!" But the messenger was already speeding away on his fattire mountain bike, black rucksack bulging with packages.

"Goodness," Curly muttered, staring at the package. It was about twelve inches by eight by eight, wrapped in greasy brown paper, and tied up with an excessive amount of old-fashioned twine. It was so beaten-up Curly wondered if the messenger had been run over by a truck on the way over. The address was written in a childish hand: For the rocks and minerals curator, The Museum of Natural History.

Curly broke up the dottle in the bottom of his pipe while gazing thoughtfully at the package. The museum received hundreds of packages every week from children, containing "donations" for the collection. Such donations included everything from squashed bugs and worthless rocks to arrowheads and mummified roadkill. He sighed, then rose painfully from the comfort of his chair and tucked the package under his arm. He put the pipe to one side, slid open the door of his pillbox, and stepped into the sunlight, blinking twice. Then he turned in the direction of the mailroom receiving dock, which was only a few hundred feet across the service drive.

"What have you got there, Mr. Tuttle?" came a voice. Curly glanced toward the voice. It was Digby Greenlaw, the new assistant director for administration, who was just exiting the tunnel from the staff parking lot.

Curly did not answer immediately. He didn't like Greenlaw and his condescending Mr. Tuttle. A few weeks earlier, Greenlaw had taken exception to the way Curly checked IDs, complaining that he "wasn't really looking at them." Heck, Curly didn't have to look at them-he knew every employee of the museum on sight.

"Package," he grunted in reply. Greenlaw's voice took on an officious tone. "Packages are supposed to be delivered directly to the mailroom. And you're not supposed to leave your station."

Curly kept walking. He had reached an age where he found the best way to deal with unpleasantness was to pretend it didn't exist. He could hear the footsteps of the administrator quicken behind him, the voice rising a few notches on the assumption he was hard of hearing. "Mr. Tuttle? I said you should not leave your station unattended."

Curly stopped, turned. "Thank you for offering, doctor." He held out the package.

Greenlaw stared it at, squinting. "I didn't say I would deliver it." Curly remained in place, proffering the package. "Oh, for heaven's sake." Greenlaw reached irritably for the package, but his hand faltered midway. "It's a funny-looking thing. What is it?" "Dunno, doctor. Came by messenger."

"It seems to have been mishandled." Curly shrugged.

But Greenlaw still didn't take the package. He leaned toward it, squinting. "It's torn. There's a hole ... Look, there's something coming out."

Curly looked down. The corner of the package did indeed have a hole, and a thin stream of brown powder was trickling out. "What in the world?" Curly said.

Greenlaw took a step back. "It's leaking some kind of powder." His voice rode up a notch. "Oh my Lord. What is it?"

Curly stood rooted to the spot. "Good God, Curly, drop it! It's anthrax!"

Greenlaw stumbled backward, his face contorted in panic. "It's a terrorist attack-someone call the police! I've been exposed! Oh my God, I've been exposed!"

The administrator stumbled and fell backward on the cobblestones, clawing the ground and springing to his feet, and then he was off and running. Almost immediately, two guards came spilling out of the guard station across the way, one intercepting Greenlaw while the other made for Curly.

"What are you doing?" Greenlaw shrieked. "Keep back! Call 911!" Curly remained where he was, package in hand. This was something so far outside his experience that his mind seemed to have stopped working.

The guards fell back, Greenlaw at their heels. For a moment, the small courtyard was strangely quiet. Then a shrill alarm went off, deafening in the enclosed space. In less than five minutes, the air was filled with the sound of approaching sirens, culminating in an uproar of activity: police cars, flashing lights, crackling radios, and uniformed men rushing this way and that stringing up yellow biohazard tape and erecting a cordon, megaphones shouting at the growing crowds to back off, while at the same time telling Curly to drop the package and step away, drop the package and step away.

But Curly didn't drop the package and step away. He remained frozen in utter confusion, staring at the thin brown stream that continued to trickle out of the tear in the package, forming a small pile on the cobbles at his feet.

And now two strange-looking men wearing puffy white suits and hoods with plastic visors were approaching, walking slowly, hands outstretched like something Curly had seen in an old science fiction movie. One gently took Curly by the shoulders while the other slipped the package from his fingers and-with infinite care-placed it in a blue plastic box. The first man led him to one side and began carefully vacuuming him up and down with a funny-looking device, and then they began dressing him, too, in one of the strange plastic suits, all the time telling him in low electronic voices that he was going to be all right, that they were taking him to the hospital for a few tests, that everything would be fine. As they placed the hood over his head, Curly began to feel his mind coming back to life, his body able to move again.

"Scuse me, doctor?" he said to one of the men as they led him off toward a van that had backed through the police cordon and was waiting for him, doors open.

"Yes?"

"My pipe." He nodded toward the pillbox. "Don't forget to bring my pipe."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from The Book of the Dead by Douglas Preston Lincoln Child Copyright © 2006 by Splendide Mendax, Inc., and Lincoln Child. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 160 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(90)

4 Star

(34)

3 Star

(20)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(8)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 207 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 25, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    GREAT BOOK!

    Loved this book. Although it doesn't have to be read in sequence---this is the first Pendergrast novel I have read, it does have references to prior events and would probably be even better read it sequence. Characters are odd enough to hold your attention, plot with the Egyptian tomb was really good. It had enough, supernatural to keep you guessing. I'm going to order the other novels now since this one was so good!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2008

    My First Pendergast Novel

    I found this book before knowing about all the other Pendergast novels but it's safe to say this one got me hooked! I love the character and the pace of this book, truly thrilling to read.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    Another spine chiller!

    This was a great story. It never stopped being interesting and kept me on the edge my seat the whole time. Dark, musty museum basements crammed with ancient artifacts are the perfect eerie setting for a good thriller.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2008

    Frigging Good Book

    The Book of the Dead by Douglas Preston, and Lincoln Child is well written. The over all story had many twists and turns in regards to whom was Digeones Pendergast.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2008

    The best of book ever!

    The Book of the Dead had me wanting to read more and more as the action never stopped. This thrilling roller coaster ride of a story always had you thinking one thing but changed to the exact opposite.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2008

    Another success

    I really enjoyed this novel. I do wish, however, that the one character, who will remain unmentioned, that 'died' would make an amazing return in some way... and continue to taunt Pendergast. I really enjoy these outstanding novelists. Keep it up.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2007

    Satisfying Solution

    As the final book of what the authors term 'The Diogenes Trilogy' I was all set for a final battle to the death between Pendergast and his very evil brother Diogenes. I was pleasantly surprised to see the book move in a very different direction. Perhaps too much time was spent in extricating Pendergast from his unjust confinement, but the detailed process was executed with fascinating and belivable precision. As with the other Pendergast books, the strange protagonist manages to carry out his plans with such amazing ability that it is a bit mystifying that Diogenes could have accomplished so much of the mayhem that he has pulled off in the past. It was painful to watch Diogenes in action as he duped the the innocent Constance, but the reversal which happens is both believable and highly satisfying. The character of Constance is one which bears even further development, which I suspect is what will happen in Wheel of Darkness. I certainly hope so!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2013

    I just finished reading this book and ordered the 8th in the ser

    I just finished reading this book and ordered the 8th in the series. Starting with book one and then going forward is the way to go. Each book introduces someone new but included is past characters. This makes for an easier read and quite frankly a sentimental attachment. I am attached to the older characters and their personalities and what they will contribute to the book. The introduction of a new character is just an addition to the family. Pendergrast is what holds it all together and is a must appearance in all the books. I have read 7 books of the series within a short time as I cannot seem to stop myself. Start with book one and you will find that with each book you are drawn into the world of Pendergast and the meeting of old friends.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    One of my favorite crime novels of all time!

    Book of the Dead was my first introduction to Preston and Child and the Pendergast series - and now I'm completely hooked! The plot is so intricate that we're always left guessing who is good and who is bad, and if, perhaps, there are some supernatural forces at work. A brilliant mix of suspense, crime, psychology, and history - this book won't disappoint readers of many genres - and will probably having you running into your local Natural History museum asap! Preston and Child have a wonderful writing style that sucks you in, terrifies you, and won't let you go until the final battle. Agent Pendergast at his finest!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2012

    Another excellent entry to the series.

    The authors have once again created a page turner that you simply cannot put down. You become engaged in the fates of all the characters. What a spectacular story they weave!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Really 10 stars

    How do Preston and Child come up with the plot twists, turn of events, original plot lines, unique characters and weave everything into an incredible story? I don't know, but they amaze me and I'm hooked on their books. I thorougly enjoy how not only the Pendergast character has developed, but Smithback, Nora Kelly - and of course, Vincent. The Pendergast "brain" just always amazes....

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2008

    'Dead' indeed

    This was just awful. The characters, the writing, the plot. All of it was a joke. Really bad stuff. Stick to the better known names in this genre.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2007

    What a wonderful surprise!!!

    This is the first Preston/Child book I have read. What a delight! Quick read, suspensful, great characters, intricate plot and just enough reality to keep you looking over your shoulder. I'm hooked and recommend this book to great mystery fans.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    cerebral mystery within non-stop adventure

    Serial killer FBI special agent Aloysius Pendergast is serving time in solitary confinement in upstate New York¿s Herkmoor Federal Correctional Facility, a maximum security prison that no one has ever escaped from. At the same time that the disgraced Fed assumes his adversarial brother Diogenes set him up, the New York Museum of Natural History is trapped in scandal, embarrassment and fabrication. The museum has been exposed by the media concealing that dust is what has become of the priceless diamond collection stolen by them during a less than ethical era and recently purloined by Diogenes. --- To distract the public, the museum hires archaeologist Nora Kelly and British Museum Egyptologist Dr. Adrian Wicherly to reconstruct the Tomb of Senef from artifacts in their basement. The plan is to dazzle wealthy patrons and the press especially her spouse a New York Times reporter, who broke the diamond story. Adrian realizes that the tomb's hieroglyphics include a curse of insanity on whoever besmirches it, which happens as workers and visitors become crazed murderers. FBI agent Vinnie D'Agosta frees his peer Aloysius from prison while Diogenes stands trial for murder. --- Though THE BOOK OF THE DEAD is exciting and can stand alone, newcomers should first read the previous Special Agent Pendergast thrillers (see DANCE OF DEATH and BRIMSTONE) because this tale ties up the dangling participles from the previous novels. The story line is action-packed with supernatural overtones and homage to Holmes and Moriarty gripping readers from start to finish as Douglas J. Preston and Lincoln Child deliver a terrific thriller that never takes a breather. No one combines a cerebral (think Holmes) mystery with non-stop adventure (this team wrote RELIC) than this pair as they prove this once again. --- Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 27, 2014

    Highly Recommended

    This book is one that will keep you on your toes. Each page keeps you reading more. Can't put the book down. This is an awesome series and you must read every one in order. Highly additive.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 24, 2013

    Gj tuyo

    Yitu . Yt

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2013

    As usual, I cannot put this book down. What a story!

    As usual, I cannot put this book down. What a story!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 12, 2013

    Excellent

    I always enjoy following A. X. L. Pendergast.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 21, 2013

    Excellent detective series - play with your mind a bit

    This 7th books doesn't end the series but offers some closure on events and, if you've read others by these guys you'll welcome the background character development. These authors reward Nook reading where slightly unfamiliar words can be quickly looked-up and added to your vocabulary.

    Wouldn't it be neat if Barnes & Noble hosted a Preston & Child night for six weeks or so and facilitated discussion! They could even use this series as a way to help people understand additional ways to use their Nook.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Good read

    I loved this book. I have read almost the whole series and could read for hours. However if there is a problem with Barnes and noble customer service emails never get an answer and calling them I just get transferred to departments end up going in circles.

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