The Book of the Living Dead

The Book of the Living Dead

4.5 2
by John Richard Stephens, Theophile Gautier, Charles Baudelaire, John H. Knox
     
 

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From Poe to Lovecraft-a unique zombiethology of the literary undead.

Corpses rise in a variety of frightening ways in this collection of classic stories by an impressive lineup of authors including:

Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Washington Irving, H.P. Lovecraft, Guy de Maupassant, Mark Twain, Jack London, William Wyman Jacobs, Théophile

Overview

From Poe to Lovecraft-a unique zombiethology of the literary undead.

Corpses rise in a variety of frightening ways in this collection of classic stories by an impressive lineup of authors including:

Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Washington Irving, H.P. Lovecraft, Guy de Maupassant, Mark Twain, Jack London, William Wyman Jacobs, Théophile Gautier, Charles Baudelaire, John H. Knox, Sir Hugh Clifford, Thomas Burke, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, F. Marion Crawford, F.G. Loring, William Butler Yeats, Douglas Hyde, E.F. Benson, Lafcadio Hearn, Perceval Landon, E. and H. Heron, Amy Lowell, G.W. Hutter, and Sir Walter Scott.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
This solid collection of classic gothic horror stories from the 19th and early 20th centuries relies heavily on highly anthologized workhorses such as Edgar Allan Poe's "The Facts of M. Valdemar's Case," an excerpt from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and H.P. Lovecraft's "Herbert West: Reanimator." Stevens also includes a few lesser-known pieces from authors famous for more than horror, such as Jack London's "A Thousand Deaths" and Mark Twain's "A Curious Dream," along with obscurities such as an 1888 newspaper article about a hanged man dancing by reflex after the body was cut down, and imagist poet Amy Lowell's polyphonic "The Cross-Roads." More retrospective than groundbreaking, this anthology is tailor-made for academia and will also interest horror fans curious about the ancestors of modern-day supernatural tales. (Oct.)
Library Journal
Stephens, an editor whose credentials mostly include thematic collections of previously published material for Barnes & Noble (e.g., Mysterious Cat Stories), does the same here. All of the contents are from the past, between 1818 and 1940, with a concentration on the Romantics and the pulps. Poe, Twain, and Goethe rub shoulders with unknowns, hacks, and one newspaper story from 1888. There are some gems, especially Poe's "The Facts of M. Valdemar's Case," H.P. Lovecraft's "Herbert West: Reanimator," and W.W. Jacobs's "The Monkey's Paw," but all of these are available elsewhere, and in much better company. BZG Who knew Jack London wrote a zombie story?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425237069
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/05/2010
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
6.06(w) x 9.04(h) x 0.92(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

John Richard Stephens is a full-time writer and anthologist. He lives in Cambria, California.

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The Book of the Living Dead 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Edjucational in its own way:3
harstan More than 1 year ago
This is a fascinating collection of a who's who of literature that writes a short horror thriller. Some of the contributors are expected to appear in an anthology dedicated to the living dead; defined by Editor John Richard Stephens to include zombies, vampires, mummies, other unclassified reanimated corpses, and a couple even beyond that miscellaneous categorization. Readers will expect Mart Shelley (abbreviated "Frankenstein"), Edgar Allan Poe ("The Facts of M. Valdemar's Case"), H.P. Lovecraft ("Herbert West: Reanaimator") and Washington Irving ("The Adventures of the German Student"). Fans will also recognize some of the titles like "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W. Jacobs and "The Ghoul" by Sir Hugh Clifford. These are all super entries. However, the fun in the tale is discovering works by famous writers whose genre is as far from horror as the sun is from Pluto. These include Guy de Maupassant ("The Hand") Mark Twain ("A Curious Dream"), Sir Walter Scott ("The hero of the Tomb") and Jack London ("A Thousand Deaths"). All twenty-seven contributions are terrific as life after death proves chillingly dark and deadly to the delight of readers. Harriet Klausner