The Book with a Hole

The Book with a Hole

5.0 1
by Hervé Tullet
     
 

The Book with a Hole blasts a hole through the middle of the book itself. Sometimes the hole is an eye the reader can look through; sometimes it is a mouth and the reader's fingers make the teeth! The next minute it is a plate (with food drawn by the reader on a sheet of paper behind the book), an obstacle to jump across, or a saucepan. It's crazy! It's a

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Overview

The Book with a Hole blasts a hole through the middle of the book itself. Sometimes the hole is an eye the reader can look through; sometimes it is a mouth and the reader's fingers make the teeth! The next minute it is a plate (with food drawn by the reader on a sheet of paper behind the book), an obstacle to jump across, or a saucepan. It's crazy! It's a Book with a Hole! 

Packed full of Hervé Tullet's zany drawings and inventive ideas, this is bound to enchant children of all ages.

Praise for The Book with a Hole
« “Deliciously interactive and profoundly immersive, this book provides rich imaginative play from cover to cover. Most apps have a long way to go before they will be as artful and engaging as this interactive wonder.” –Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“Tullet's simple innovation allows readers to become active participants in the experience of reading.” –Publishers Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
As the title suggests, this oversize book has a die-cut hole—a large semicircle is cut out of the book's spine, which becomes a full circle in the center of the book when opened, serving different interactive functions in a series of spare b&w scenes. "Who's the king of the castle?" Tullet asks on one spread (the hole takes the place of the royal's head, so kids can "crown" themselves). In another spread, the hole is in the center of a traffic roundabout, and Tullet suggests placing a sculpture in the center. Some spreads offer explicit instructions ("Crumple up a sheet of paper, make a ball, and play basketball"), and many allow for free, creative expression ("What idea will you have next?"). As with his recent Press Here, Tullet's simple innovation allows readers to become active participants in the experience of reading. Ages 3�8. (May)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
The large size, 96-page paperbound book really has a six-inch diameter hole in the middle when it is opened. The hole is the center of every double page, representing everything from the top of a pot or a dish to open mouths, centers of puzzles, or beginnings of pictures to be finished by the reader. The hand-lettered text consists of just a few words per double page, asking a question or challenging the reader to speculate on what is happening, or play some game. What is the man looking at through the hole in the telescope? Who lives on a magical island? We are even encouraged to use the hole as a basket to toss a crumpled piece of paper through. Thick black lines define shapes on white pages; some pages are all black with white graphics. There is no other color. Black felt-tipped pen in hand, readers should be eager to engage in some of the suggested activities, either alone or in groups. This is a true challenge to the definition of a book. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—As he did in Press Here (Chronicle, 2011), Tullet does an exemplary job of getting children to engage in imaginative play. Each black-and-white spread in this oversize book has a 5½-inch hole cut out of the center, which becomes the focal point. The text consists of questions that the artist poses to readers, encouraging their participation and prompting creative thinking. On the "What are you going to feed it?" page, the picture shows a three-eyed monster's face drawn around its large open mouth while it holds a knife and fork. "Who's the king of the castle?" allows children the opportunity of putting their faces through the hole and immediately becoming royalty with a crown and jewels. Other pictures invent games to play, including basketball with the hole as the hoop and a racetrack with an invitation to run a finger along the zigzagging line without falling through the hole. The large, childlike illustrations contribute to the interactivity, even suggesting some 3-D elements.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews

Deliciously interactive and profoundly immersive, this book provides rich imaginative play from cover to cover.

The cover is red, black and white, with a substantial diecut half-circle void bisecting its spine. The pages are just black and white. Each spread has an irresistible circular hole in its middle and a few black lines to make an image for its question. "What are you going to cook?" invites readers to see the hole as the opening of a pot, with savory steam rising from it. The hole becomes the mouth of a three-eyed creature, the stomach of a dyspeptic gentleman ("what did he eat too much of?") and then the expansive middle of a cheery pregnant woman ("Did she eat too much, too?") Readers can put their own heads in the holes to be king or queen or build their own block skyscraper through a hole that's surrounded by them. There's a game board—with the hole of course—to make up your own rules. Readers are invited to toss a crumpled sheet of paper through a hole to shoot baskets or to make a trunk for an elephant with their arms. Sometimes the black-and-white lines become patters with no text, leaving youngsters to ask their own questions about that hole.

Most apps have a long way to go before they will be as artful and engaging as this interactive wonder. (Picture book. 3-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781854379467
Publisher:
Tate Publishing, Limited
Publication date:
04/01/2011
Series:
Let's Play Games Series
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
152,665
Product dimensions:
10.80(w) x 12.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author


Hervé Tullet is one of the best-known children's authors and illustrators working today. He pursued a successful career in advertising before switching to creating children's books, and his illustrations regularly appear in publications including the New Yorker. His previous books include The Scribble Book and The Coloring Book.

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The Book with a Hole 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
hallca More than 1 year ago
My husband bought me this book for my classroom. It is amazing! The kids love to come up with ways to use the hole.