Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing / Edition 1

Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing / Edition 1

by John J. Ruszkiewicz, Janice R. Walker
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321023935

ISBN-13: 9780321023933

Pub. Date: 11/11/1999

Publisher: Pearson Education

What has happened to this simple work provides a rationale for Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing. Just as electronic technology has complicated the meaning of bookmark, it has similarly transformed every aspect of research. So we offer Bookmarks as a new-generation research guide built on the assumption that students need to

Overview

What has happened to this simple work provides a rationale for Bookmarks: A Guide to Research and Writing. Just as electronic technology has complicated the meaning of bookmark, it has similarly transformed every aspect of research. So we offer Bookmarks as a new-generation research guide built on the assumption that students need to appreciate both conventional methods of research and techniques associated with rapidly developing electronic technologies.

Bookmarks is designed as a bridge between old and new traditions-a guide for the college writers working in both print and electronic environments. It invites them to think of themselves, perhaps for the first time, as serious researchers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321023933
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
11/11/1999
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
355
Product dimensions:
7.38(w) x 9.02(h) x 1.05(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xiv
To the Writer xix
PART I Beginning Research 1(42)
Sizing Up Your Research Project
2(7)
Think of yourself as a researcher and writer
3(1)
Size up and assignment carefully
4(1)
Examine the details of the assignment
5(2)
Consider the forms your project might take
7(2)
Getting involved
7(1)
Managing your project
8(1)
Managing Your Project
9(10)
Establish the hard points of your project
9(1)
Define the stages of your project
10(2)
Assess your strengths and weaknesses
12(1)
Map out your project
13(1)
Work as a team
14(1)
Prepare a research proposal or prospectus
15(4)
Getting involved
17(1)
Managing your project
17(2)
Finding a Topic
19(8)
Find a topic in your world
20(1)
Connect your topic to a wider community
20(1)
Browse the library in your topic area
21(2)
Browse the Internet
23(4)
Getting involved
25(1)
Managing your project
26(1)
Establishing a Purpose
27(8)
Consider the topic as a question of fact
28(1)
Consider the topic as a question of definition
29(1)
Consider the topic as a question of value
30(1)
Consider the topic as a question of cause and effect
31(1)
Consider the topic as a question of consequence
32(3)
Getting involved
34(1)
Managing your project
34(1)
Narrowing Your Topic
35(8)
Pose questions
35(2)
Consider the kind of research appropriate to your project
37(2)
Review the library catalog and Web directories
39(1)
Talk to people
40(3)
Getting involved
40(1)
Managing your project
40(3)
PART II Gathering Ideas and Information 43(44)
Finding Information
44(21)
Learn about your library
44(2)
Use library catalogs efficiently
46(2)
Locate suitable bibliographies
48(1)
Locate suitable periodical indexes to search the periodical literature
49(3)
Check the World Wide Web
52(3)
Consult biographical resources
55(1)
Consult guides to reference works
56(1)
Locate statistics
57(1)
Check news sources
58(1)
Check book and film reviews
59(1)
Join in electronic conversations
59(1)
Write or email professional organizations
60(5)
Getting involved
61(1)
Managing your project
61(4)
Doing Keyword Searches
65(8)
Understand how a simple keyword search works
65(2)
Understand the principles of Boolean searching
67(2)
Refine your electronic search
69(1)
Evaluate your electronic search
69(1)
Keep a record of your search
70(3)
Getting involved
71(1)
Managing your project
71(2)
Conducting Field Research
73(8)
Conduct interviews
73(1)
Conduct surveys
74(3)
Make systematic observations
77(4)
Getting involved
79(1)
Managing your project
80(1)
Keeping Track of Information
81(6)
Classify the materials you might be gathering
81(1)
Prepare a working bibliography
82(1)
Make photocopies and prepare note cards for printed sources
83(2)
Print or download electronic sources
85(2)
Getting involved
85(1)
Managing your project
86(1)
PART III Working with Sources 87(46)
Choosing Appropriate Sources
88(9)
Consider the relevance of your sources
88(1)
Consider the purpose of a source
89(1)
Examine scholarly books and reference works
90(1)
Examine scholarly articles
91(1)
Examine serious trade books and serious periodicals
92(1)
Examine popular magazines and books
92(1)
Examine sponsored Web sites
92(1)
Examine individual Web sites and home pages
93(1)
Consider interviews and email
93(1)
Consider listservs and Usenet groups
93(4)
Getting involved
94(1)
Managing your project
94(3)
Evaluating Sources
97(5)
Consider authority and reputation
97(1)
Consider the credentials of experts, authors, or sponsoring agencies
97(1)
Consider the timeliness and stability of a source
98(1)
Consider the biases of a source
99(1)
Consider how well a source presents key information
99(1)
Consider commercial intrusions into a source
99(1)
Consult librarians and instructors
100(2)
Getting involved
100(1)
Managing your project
100(2)
Reviewing and Positioning Sources
102(6)
Review data and resources critically
102(2)
Position your research materials
104(4)
Getting involved
106(1)
Managing your project
107(1)
Annotating Research Materials
108(4)
Highlight key information
108(1)
Use marginal comments to start a dialogue
109(3)
Getting involved
111(1)
Managing your project
111(1)
Summarizing and Paraphrasing Sources
112(11)
Summarize or paraphrase a source
112(1)
Summarize sources to highlight key concepts
113(3)
Paraphrase sources to record important ideas
116(3)
Connect your research materials
119(4)
Getting involved
120(1)
Managing your project
120(3)
Understanding Academic Responsibility and Intellectual Property
123(10)
Understand the ethics of research
123(1)
Understand collaboration
124(1)
Understand intellectual property rights
124(1)
Acknowledge all borrowings from sources
125(2)
Summarize and paraphrase carefully
127(1)
Understand the electronic classroom
127(1)
Establish guidelines for the classroom
128(5)
Getting involved
130(1)
Managing your project
131(2)
PART IV Developing the Project 133(52)
Refining Your Claim
134(5)
Be sure you have a point to make
134(1)
Focus on issues that matter
135(1)
Limit your claim
136(3)
Getting involved
138(1)
Managing your project
138(1)
Organizing Your Project
139(11)
Create a blueprint for your project
140(1)
Consider general patterns of organization
141(3)
Accommodate dissenting voices
144(1)
Follow professional templates
145(1)
Make connections and use transitions
146(1)
Keep track of your subject
146(1)
Conform your project to ADA guidelines
147(3)
Getting involved
148(1)
Managing your project
148(2)
Drafting Your Project
150(6)
Prepare a version of your project early
150(1)
Draft your project for an audience
151(1)
Present material strategically
152(1)
Write stylishly
153(3)
Getting involved
155(1)
Managing your project
155(1)
Documenting Your Project
156(7)
Provide a source for every direct quotation
156(1)
Document all ideas not from commonknowledge
157(1)
Document all material that might be questioned
158(1)
Furnish dates and other useful information
158(1)
Use links to document electronic sources
159(4)
Getting involved
159(1)
Managing your project
160(3)
Handling Quotations
163(10)
Select direct quotations strategically
163(1)
Introduce all direct and indirect borrowings
163(2)
Handle quotation marks correctly
165(2)
Tailor your quotations to fit your sentences
167(1)
Use ellipses to indicate cuts
168(2)
Use square brackets to add information
170(1)
Use [sic] to acknowledge errors in sources
170(1)
Present quotations correctly
170(3)
Getting involved
171(1)
Managing your project
172(1)
Completing Your Project
173(12)
Review the structure of your project
173(1)
Review the design of your project
174(1)
Use graphics effectively
175(2)
Be consistent with headings
177(2)
Include all parts the project requires
179(1)
Review proper form for documentation
179(1)
Submit your project professionally
180(5)
Getting involved
180(1)
Managing your project
181(4)
Authoring Your Own Web Site 185(16)
Deciding on a format for your project
185(1)
Getting started: A basic template
186(2)
Designing your Web site
188(2)
Creating a table of contents
190(2)
Formatting text
192(2)
Using colors and graphics
194(2)
Using lists and tables
196(2)
Keeping the basics of good document design in mind
198(1)
Publishing your project on the Web
199(2)
PART V Documentation 201(132)
COS Documentation
205(30)
How do you use COS documentation?
205(7)
COS form directory---Humanities (MLA)
212(8)
Sample COS pages---Humanities (MLA)
220(2)
COS form directory---Sciences (APA)
222(8)
Sample COS pages---Sciences (APA)
230(5)
MLA Documentation
235(40)
How do you use MLA documentation?
235(7)
MLA form directory
242(19)
Sample MLA paper
261(14)
APA Documentation
275(32)
How do you use APA documentation?
275(6)
APA form directory
281(9)
Sample APA paper
290(17)
CMS Documentation
307(20)
CMS notes
307(3)
CMS bibliographies
310(2)
CMS form directory
312(5)
Sample CMS paper
317(10)
CBE Documentation
327(6)
Include in-text citations
328(1)
List sources used
329(4)
Credits 333(2)
Index 335(19)
Glossary 354

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