The Books of the Bible [NOOK Book]

Overview

Return to the Bible as it was before chapters and verses. The Bible isn’t a single book. It’s a collection of many books that were written, preserved and gathered together so that they could be shared with new generations of readers. The Bible is an invitation to you to first view the world in a new way, and then to become an agent of the world’s renewal. The Books of the Bible, NIV helps you have a more meaningful encounter with the sacred writings and to read with more understanding, so that you can take your ...

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The Books of the Bible

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Overview

Return to the Bible as it was before chapters and verses. The Bible isn’t a single book. It’s a collection of many books that were written, preserved and gathered together so that they could be shared with new generations of readers. The Bible is an invitation to you to first view the world in a new way, and then to become an agent of the world’s renewal. The Books of the Bible, NIV helps you have a more meaningful encounter with the sacred writings and to read with more understanding, so that you can take your place more readily within this story of new creation. This is a revolutionary new presentation of the NIV Scripture that strips away centuries of artificial formatting, leaving behind nothing but pure Bible text. The result is a Bible unlike any other available today — and more like the original Scriptures: specially designed to be read from start to finish. “There is no Bible more suited to reading from beginning to end.” — Scot McKnight, author of Jesus Creed Features: Specifically, this edition of the Bible differs from the most common current format in several significant ways: • Chapter and verse numbers have been removed from the text • The books are presented instead according to the internal divisions that we believe their authors have indicated • A single-column setting is used to present the text more clearly and naturally, and to avoid disrupting the intended line breaks in poetry • Footnotes, section headings and any other additional materials have been removed from the pages of the sacred text • Individual books that later tradition divided into two or more parts are put back together again • The books are arranged in an order that helps you understand the Bible more completely

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310877394
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication date: 12/21/2010
  • Series: Zondervan Quick-Reference Library
  • Sold by: Zondervan Publishing
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 96
  • Sales rank: 445,225
  • File size: 912 KB

Meet the Author

John H. Sailhamer is professor of Old Testament at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary in Brea, California and was formerly senior professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.. His other works include An Introduction to Old Testament Theology and The NIIV Compact Bible Commentary.
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Read an Excerpt

Genesis

The book of Genesis is the introduction to the Torah and the rest of the Bible. It introduces and develops the central characters and themes of the Bible story. The main characters are God, humankind, and the chosen people, Israel; the main themes are human failure, divine grace, and hope.

The narrative begins with God's creation of the world, including his special creation of human beings and his preparation of the land that he wished to give to his people, Israel (Gen. 1). This was a good land, and those whom he created to dwell in and enjoy this land were put there to worship and obey him (ch. 2). Foolishly, the first man and his wife turned away from God, their Creator, and sought to find another way to life and prosperity (ch. 3). That way ended in divine judgment and death: the first couple was expelled from the garden God had made for them (ch. 3); their first child was a murderer (ch. 4); the first civilization was destroyed by a flood (chs. 6-9); and the first great city, Babylon, humankind's only hope apart from God, was abandoned in ruins (ch. 11).

In the midst of that divine judgment, however, came the promise of grace and redemption. God's promise of a redeemer who would crush the head of the serpent (Gen. 3: 15) strikes an early note of hope. This hope reverberates throughout the subsequent chapters of Genesis and finds its full exposition in the last words of Jacob: a mighty conqueror would arise from the house of Judah and establish God's rule over all the nations (49: 8-12). The lineage of that promised redeemer is traced from Eve to the family of Noah (ch. 5), to Shem (ch. 10), to Abraham (chs. 11-25), to Isaac (ch. 26), and to Jacob (chs. 27-50), finding its ultimate fulfillment in that mighty king from the house of Judah.

When the nations were dispersed from the city of Babylon (Gen. 11), God chose Abraham and brought him back to the land prepared in creation and gave it to him and his descendants. From among those descendants, God promised to provide blessing for all humanity. Abraham would become a great nation, God would bless that nation, and through it all the nations of the earth would be blessed (12: 2-3).

The Genesis narratives go to great lengths to show that God alone would ultimately fulfill his promise. God's people continually fell short of his call.

Looking to their own strength, like Adam and Eve they often sought to find a way apart from God. However, God was patient. He continually watched over their weaknesses and provided the right help at just the right time. Isaac was born in his mother's old age when there was no longer hope for a son.

Jacob obtained his older brother's birthright and blessing by God's grace-- even before his birth and in spite of his many later attempts to rob and steal them from his brother. Through God's providential care, during a time of severe famine, Judah and his brothers were brought safely to Egypt--in spite of their attempts to kill their brother and savior, Joseph.

Exodus

The book of Exodus opens four hundred years after the close of Genesis (cf. Gen. 15: 13), with the people of Israel, heirs of God's promise of redemption, suffering under cruel oppression in Egypt (Ex. 1). Their anguished cries, however, did not go unheeded. The Lord remembered his promise to their ancestors and raised up a deliverer, Moses, to bring them back to the land he had prepared for them (chs. 2-4). In keeping with God's plan, Israel's deliverance became an occasion to make himself known to the nations. God thus displayed his power before the Egyptians through ten "signs" performed through his servant Moses (chs. 5-11). Their rivers were turned to blood, their land was infested with swarms and pestilence--not to afflict divine wrath on this nation, but to reveal God's glory (7: 5). This was the same God who desired the salvation and blessing of all the nations (Gen. 12: 3). The sacrifice of the Passover lamb, with its blood applied to the doorpost (Ex. 12-13), and the Israelites' baptism in the Red Sea (chs. 14-15; cf. 1 Cor. 10: 2) pointed to how God would one day accomplish that salvation in Christ.

God had further plans for his people. He wanted to restore to them the fellowship he desired with all human beings, created in his image. He thus entered into a covenant with Israel at Mount Sinai (Ex. 16-19). That covenant called for obedience to God's will and personal holiness. God desired that his people come to him as persons, willing to have personal fellowship with him. Thus all forms of idolatry were strictly forbidden. Instructions, sometimes extending to minute detail, were given so that there be no misunderstanding what God's will was (chs. 20-24). Most of all, the covenant entailed the worship of the one and only true God.

Though the Israelites agreed to follow God's will and obey the covenant, they quickly forsook the Lord and made for themselves an idol, a golden calf (Ex. 32). This meant a total departure from the kind of relationship God had intended for them. The covenant thus came to an abrupt halt. Moses shattered the stone tablets of the covenant, and the people were severely punished.

Only the grace of God (34: 6-7) ensured a renewed covenant and continued fellowship between God and his people.

Because of Israel's disobedience, God gave them even more laws and became more specific in the kinds of obedience he required. But God continued to live among his people, even instructing them in detail on the kind of "house" he was to have among them. That house, or tent, was called the tabernacle. This structure they built in the desert, following the plan God laid out (chs. 25-40). Since the plan was a copy of God's dwelling in heaven, the tabernacle served to bring heaven to earth. Such a condescension on God's part to live among an unholy people necessitated stringent measures to protect his holiness (see Leviticus).

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Table of Contents

Contents Introduction How to Use This Book Acknowledgments Christian Life Issues Authenticity Being Salt and Light The Bible Christian Character Compassion Contentment Courage Honesty Purity Self-Control Christian Life, General The Church Evangelism Gossip/Slander Hypocrisy Joy of the Christian Life Servanthood Serving God Tithing Holidays/Special Services Baptism Christmas Communion Easter Father’s Day Good Friday Mother’s Day Thanksgiving Identity of God God as a Refuge God as Creator/Creation God as Father God’s Character, General God’s Faithfulness God’s Forgiveness of Us God’s Goodness God’s Holiness God’s Love God’s Majesty God’s Mercy God’s Power God’s Presence God’s Tenderness God’s Wisdom Jesus Life Issues Death Decision Making Emotional Issues Anger Bondage to the Past Disappointment Disillusionment Failure Fear Grief Guilt Hardship Healing Loneliness Self-Esteem Worry Endurance Heroes Leadership Materialism/Greed Men’s Issues Money Management Moral Issues Pace of Life/Balance Power Regret Risk Taking Selfishness/Pride Values Women’s Issues Work Issues Marketplace Pressures Success Work/Marketplace Issues Workaholism Relationship with God Anger Toward God Changed Life Commitment to Christ Confession Discipleship Doubting Faith Freedom in Christ Glorifying God God’s Acceptance of Us God’s Laws Heaven Lordship of Christ Obeying God Praise and Worship Prayer Relationship With God, General Sanctification/Growing in Christ Sin Relationships Comforting Others Communication Community Control Issues Draining Relationships Family Relationships Decay of the Family Destructive Parenting Family Conflict Family Relationships, General Generation Gap Parent–Child Relationships Parenting Friendship Love Marriage and Dating Adultery Dating Divorce Intimacy Male–Female Differences Marriage, General Romance Sex Personality Differences Relational Conflict Small Groups Truth Telling Seeker Issues Apologetics Basics of Christianity Grace Grace vs. Works/Legalism Our Need for Christ Our Value to God Salvation Fulfillment Life Foundation Misconceptions of Christianity New Christians Other Religions Spiritual Seeking Social Issues Abortion Caring for the Poor Homosexuality The Power of the Media Racism The State of the World Song Index Drama Index
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First Chapter

Genesis
The book of Genesis is the introduction to the Torah and the rest of the
Bible. It introduces and develops the central characters and themes of the Bible story. The main characters are God, humankind, and the chosen people, Israel;
the main themes are human failure, divine grace, and hope.
The narrative begins with God's creation of the world, including his special creation of human beings and his preparation of the land that he wished to give to his people, Israel (Gen. 1). This was a good land, and those whom he created to dwell in and enjoy this land were put there to worship and obey him
(ch. 2). Foolishly, the first man and his wife turned away from God, their Creator,
and sought to find another way to life and prosperity (ch. 3). That way ended in divine judgment and death: the first couple was expelled from the garden God had made for them (ch. 3); their first child was a murderer (ch. 4); the first civilization was destroyed by a flood (chs. 6--9); and the first great city, Babylon,
humankind's only hope apart from God, was abandoned in ruins (ch. 11).
In the midst of that divine judgment, however, came the promise of grace and redemption. God's promise of a redeemer who would crush the head of the serpent (Gen. 3:15) strikes an early note of hope. This hope reverberates throughout the subsequent chapters of Genesis and finds its full exposition in the last words of Jacob: a mighty conqueror would arise from the house of Judah and establish God's rule over all the nations (49:8--12). The lineage of that promised redeemer is traced from Eve to the family of Noah (ch. 5), to Shem
(ch. 10), to Abraham (chs. 11--25), to Isaac (ch. 26), and to Jacob (chs. 27--
50), finding its ultimate fulfillment in that mighty king from the house of Judah.
When the nations were dispersed from the city of Babylon (Gen. 11),
God chose Abraham and brought him back to the land prepared in creation and gave it to him and his descendants. From among those descendants, God promised to provide blessing for all humanity. Abraham would become a great nation, God would bless that nation, and through it all the nations of the earth would be blessed (12:2--3).
The Genesis narratives go to great lengths to show that God alone would ultimately fulfill his promise. God's people continually fell short of his call.
Looking to their own strength, like Adam and Eve they often sought to find a way apart from God. However, God was patient. He continually watched over their weaknesses and provided the right help at just the right time. Isaac was born in his mother's old age when there was no longer hope for a son.
Jacob obtained his older brother's birthright and blessing by God's grace---
even before his birth and in spite of his many later attempts to rob and steal them from his brother. Through God's providential care, during a time of severe famine, Judah and his brothers were brought safely to Egypt---in spite of their attempts to kill their brother and savior, Joseph.
Exodus
The book of Exodus opens four hundred years after the close of Gene-sis
(cf. Gen. 15:13), with the people of Israel, heirs of God's promise of redemption, suffering under cruel oppression in Egypt (Ex. 1). Their anguished cries, however, did not go unheeded. The Lord remembered his promise to their ancestors and raised up a deliverer, Moses, to bring them back to the land he had prepared for them (chs. 2--4). In keeping with God's plan, Israel's deliverance became an occasion to make himself known to the nations. God thus displayed his power before the Egyptians through ten 'signs' performed through his servant Moses (chs. 5--11). Their rivers were turned to blood, their land was infested with swarms and pestilence---not to afflict divine wrath on this nation, but to reveal God's glory (7:5). This was the same God who desired the salvation and blessing of all the nations (Gen. 12:3). The sacrifice of the Passover lamb, with its blood applied to the doorpost (Ex. 12--
13), and the Israelites' baptism in the Red Sea (chs. 14--15; cf. 1 Cor. 10:2)
pointed to how God would one day accomplish that salvation in Christ.
God had further plans for his people. He wanted to restore to them the fellowship he desired with all human beings, created in his image. He thus entered into a covenant with Israel at Mount Sinai (Ex. 16--19). That covenant called for obedience to God's will and personal holiness. God desired that his people come to him as persons, willing to have personal fellowship with him. Thus all forms of idolatry were strictly forbidden. Instructions, sometimes extending to minute detail, were given so that there be no misunderstanding what God's will was (chs. 20--24). Most of all, the covenant entailed the worship of the one and only true God.
Though the Israelites agreed to follow God's will and obey the covenant,
they quickly forsook the Lord and made for themselves an idol, a golden calf
(Ex. 32). This meant a total departure from the kind of relationship God had intended for them. The covenant thus came to an abrupt halt. Moses shattered the stone tablets of the covenant, and the people were severely punished.
Only the grace of God (34:6--7) ensured a renewed covenant and continued fellowship between God and his people.
Because of Israel's disobedience, God gave them even more laws and became more specific in the kinds of obedience he required. But God continued to live among his people, even instructing them in detail on the kind of 'house' he was to have among them. That house, or tent, was called the tabernacle. This structure they built in the desert, following the plan God laid out (chs. 25--40). Since the plan was a copy of God's dwelling in heaven,
the tabernacle served to bring heaven to earth. Such a condescension on God's part to live among an unholy people necessitated stringent measures to protect his holiness (see Leviticus).
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