Books That Build Character: A Guide to Teaching Your Child Moral Values Through Stories

Overview

Here is a family guide to classic novels, contemporary fiction, myths and legends, science fiction and fantasy, folktales, Bible stories, picture books, biographies, holiday stories, and many other books that celebrate virtues and values.
There are more than 300 titles to choose from, each featuring a dramatic story and memorable characters who explore moral ground and the difference between what is right and what is wrong. These books will capture your child's imagination, and ...

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Overview

Here is a family guide to classic novels, contemporary fiction, myths and legends, science fiction and fantasy, folktales, Bible stories, picture books, biographies, holiday stories, and many other books that celebrate virtues and values.
There are more than 300 titles to choose from, each featuring a dramatic story and memorable characters who explore moral ground and the difference between what is right and what is wrong. These books will capture your child's imagination, and conscience as well-whether it is Beauty pondering her promise to Beast, mischievous Max in Where the Wild Things Are, the troubled boys of Lord of the Flies, generous Mr. Badger in The Wind in the Willows, or the courageous struggles of such real-life characters as Frederick Douglass and Anne Frank.
With entries arranged by category and reading level, there is something here for all readers-from preschoolers to teenagers-whatever their tastes may be. Each entry features a complete plot summary and publisher information so that you can find the book with ease in your local library or bookstore. It's not always easy to teach a child the difference between right and wrong, but stories-whether they are based on fantasy or rooted in real life-can speak to children more eloquently than any list of dos or don'ts and can impart moral values as they nurture a child's imagination.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671884239
  • Publisher: Touchstone
  • Publication date: 11/1/1994
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 793,769
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

WILLIAM KILPATRICK, Professor of Education at Boston College, is the author of four previous books, including Why Johnny Can't Tell Right from Wrong, and is a frequent lecturer to university and parent audiences. Gregory and Suzanne M. Wolfe created The Golden Key, an award-winning children's book catalogue. Gregory Wolfe is editor and publisher of Image: A Journal of the Arts & Religion. Suzanne M. Wolfe is at work on her first novel.

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Read an Excerpt


Reading to Children

Just as a child learns from real experiences, he can also learn from vicarious ones-and far more safely. Through books he can experience revelations that might not come to him until much later in the normal course of events: revelations of fear, of failure, of love, of understanding. What's more, reading provides a sort of mental rehearsal for the time when he encounters these experiences firsthand.

Here are some practical suggestions for sharing books with children:

  • Try to set aside some time each day for storytelling.
  • Recommended reading levels are only a rough guide. Parents need to develop a feel for what will work with their own children. Since there are so many good books available there's no reason to try to force a particular book on a child. This is doubly true for classics. They can be introduced too early or in the wrong way, spoiling a child's taste for them later on. Beverly Cleary, author of the Ramona series, relates, "When I was a child, a relative gave me Ivanhoe to grow into. I was so disappointed that I still have not grown into it."
  • Keep in mind that children can understand and enjoy listening to stories that are above their actual reading level.
  • For very small children the main thing is to hear stories that are rhythmic and repetitive. It's the sound of the language that counts most at this stage.
  • Be aware that myths, fairy tales, and folktales come in many versions-versions that range from the sublime to the abysmal. For example, you wouldn't think that "Rumpelstiltskin" could be rolled out flat as a pancake, but it has been done. Another factor in choosing a version of a book is the quality of the illustrations. While illustrations are not all important, they do make a difference; look fo editions with illustrations that do justice to the text rather than trivialize it.
  • When reading aloud choose stories that you, yourself, like. Reading should be enjoyable for everyone involved.
  • Practice when possible. Good stories deserve a good reading. Read the story yourself before reading it to your children. That way you'll have a better idea of it's plot and rhythm and bumpy spots.
  • Be expressive. Learn when to slow down, when to speed up, when to pause. Create suspense by lowering your voice, create a dramatic effect by raising it. You might try changing your voice to fit each character. Don't be concerned that you lack the vocalization skills of a professional actor; children constitute a forgiving and enthusiastic audience.
  • It is important to set the right mood when reading aloud. Allow time for your children to settle down. If you're reading from a picture book you might spend some time talking about the book's cover. Ask your children what they think the story will be about. If it's a chapter in a novel, you might want to follow Jim Trelease's advice and ask, "Let's see-where did we leave off yesterday?" or 'What's happened so far?"
  • Don't be tempted to explain the "moral" of the story. Let the book speak for itself. Family reading time should not be confused with a class in interpretation. On the other hand, it's fine if a story leads to conversation. Occasionally it might be appropriate to ask a question or two about a character's actions or motivations. But don't overdo it. It's better if questions come spontaneously from your child.
  • Read-aloud time shoud be balanced with silent reading time. Even prereaders should have time alone with picture books. Try instituting a practice of silent reading time for the whole family. Instead of gathering around the television at night make the bookcase the focus of attention.

Copyright © 1994 by William Kilpatrick, Gregory Wolfe, and Suzanne M. Wolfe.

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