The Culture of Contentment

The Culture of Contentment

by John Kenneth Galbraith
     
 

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This book traces the course of America's current sense of contentment, stemming from the economic comfort achieved by the fortunate, politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s. Galbraith focuses on the results of this stasis, including short-term thinking and investment, government as a burden, and corporate sclerosis. The author also…  See more details below

Overview

This book traces the course of America's current sense of contentment, stemming from the economic comfort achieved by the fortunate, politically dominant community during the Reagan-Bush era of the 1980s. Galbraith focuses on the results of this stasis, including short-term thinking and investment, government as a burden, and corporate sclerosis. The author also explores international issues, such as the parallels between the denial of trouble in Eastern Europe and problems unrecognized in America. This book is a groundbreaking assessment of the future of America.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This is Galbraith's analysis of the bind we Americans have put ourselves in since Reagan-Bush. His thesis is that we have become a ``culture of contentment'' wherein the majority of those who vote are socially and economically advantaged and will fight like tigers to maintain that advantage by voting against increased taxation that would reduce the federal deficit and respond to aching social problems. ``The result is government that is accommodated not to reality or common need but to the beliefs of the contented.'' ``Having enough, many wish for more.'' Greed has thus given us reduced income taxes for the rich, Michael Milken, the S&L scandal, a bloated military, etc. What is needed is a return to strong governmental regulation, reduced military spending, and a stringent progressive income tax. Nothing ``would so contribute to social tranquility as some screams of anguish from the very affluent'' that would provide more money to public education, welfare services, employment training, public housing, and libraries. ``The question . . . is not what can be done but what will be paid.'' Essential for all academic and public libraries. Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 12/91 . -- Jeffrey R. Herold, Bucyrus P.L., Ohio
Booknews
A concise, contumacious critique of the complacent class that rules America in the interest of its own comfort, by distinguished economist Galbraith (emeritus, Harvard U.). Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395669198
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/08/1993
Pages:
195
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.76(d)

Meet the Author

John Kenneth Galbraith who was born in 1908, is the Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics Emeritus at Harvard University and a past president of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is the distinguished author of thirty-one books spanning three decades, including The Affluent Society, The Good Society, and The Great Crash. He has been awarded honorary degrees from Harvard, Oxford, the University of Paris, and Moscow University, and in 1997 he was inducted into the Order of Canada and received the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 2000, at a White House ceremony, he was given the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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