Eclipse Modeling Framework / Edition 1

Eclipse Modeling Framework / Edition 1

4.0 2
by Frank Budinsky
     
 

ISBN-10: 0131425420

ISBN-13: 2900131425421

Pub. Date: 08/20/2003

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

This guide to Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF) explains how EMF unifies Java, XML, and UML, and provides an overview of the various EMF classes. Particular attention is given the EMF models, EMF generator, programming, EMF API, and EMF.edit API. The book also supplies examples of many common framework customization and programming techniques. The authors are…  See more details below

Overview

This guide to Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF) explains how EMF unifies Java, XML, and UML, and provides an overview of the various EMF classes. Particular attention is given the EMF models, EMF generator, programming, EMF API, and EMF.edit API. The book also supplies examples of many common framework customization and programming techniques. The authors are computer programmers and software developers. Annotation ©2003 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900131425421
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
08/20/2003
Series:
Eclipse Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
680

Table of Contents

Foreword
Foreword
Preface
References
Pt. IEMF Overview1
Ch. 1Eclipse3
Ch. 2Introducing EMF9
Ch. 3Model Editing with EMF.Edit39
Ch. 4Using EMF - A Simple Overview65
Pt. IIDefining EMF Models93
Ch. 5Ecore Modeling Concepts95
Ch. 6Java Source Code115
Ch. 7XML Schema129
Ch. 8UML143
Pt. IIIUsing the EMF Generator159
Ch. 9EMF Generator Patterns161
Ch. 10EMF Edit Generator Patterns213
Ch. 11Running the Generators241
Ch. 12Example - Implementing a Model and Editor265
Pt. IVProgramming with EMF291
Ch. 13EMF Client Programming293
Ch. 14EMF Edit Programming351
Pt. VEmf Api379
Ch. 15The org.eclipse.emf.common Plug-In381
Ch. 16The org.eclipse.emf.common.ui Plug-In431
Ch. 17The org.eclipse.emf.ecore Plug-In443
Ch. 18The org.eclipse.emf.ecore.xmi Plug-In525
Pt. VIEMF.Edit API539
Ch. 19The org.eclipse.emf.edit Plug-In541
Ch. 20The org.eclipse.emf.edit.ui Plug-In617
App. AUML Notation645
App. BSummary of Example Models651
Index663

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Eclipse Modeling Framework 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book served as my introduction to Eclipse, and I found it not as helpful as just playing with Eclipse itself. After play time was over, I went to the book again, and saw some improvements that I could have used.

I don¿t mean to say that the book is bad. It¿s a little overweight with Java references, true, but it still covers one of the best Java IDEs available, and the fact that it¿s better than many commercial IDEs just makes it more pleasing.

I believe I got this book when I wasn¿t ready for it, or when I wasn¿t the main target audience, and that this may skew my perception of it. In any sense, the book just wasn¿t my piece of pie, but I can see it being someone elses.

Guest More than 1 year ago
If you have used Eclipse to program Java, you might have gotten comfortable with its capabilities. Very intuitive and kindly donated by IBM to open source. So when I opened this book, I anticipated oodles of helpful tweaks and shortcuts. But not so. IBM has indeed provided these in the book. But their goals were far more ambitious. The Eclipse Modelling Framework is a serious effort to incorporate into a development environment java, XML and UML. They found, perhaps correctly, that most Java programmers, including, and maybe especially the experienced ones, don't really use UML much. Okay, as an afterthought, to document a code base upon a major release. But rarely as a starting point. So one intent is to seamlessly let java programmers incorporate UML. More strongly, they claim that EMF lets you define a model in any of java, XML or UML. Then simply clicking a button will make EMF generate the other 2 forms. The greatest payoff for this is that it lets programmers, who may not be fluent in UML, make a graphical UML model and thence have EMF make the java code stubs. Much less error prone than doing it manually. There is an analogy here with Spice, if any of you have an electrical engineering background. Until the late 80s, if you wanted to model a circuit in Spice, you typically drew it by hand on paper. Then you manually transcribed these into a text file of netlists that was input into Spice. Slow and very error prone. Then along came MicroSim, Carver Mead's Magic program and others, that let you construct a circuit diagram on a console, and from which you could press a button and a Spice input file would be made. Much more productive. The book offers a similar gain in productivity. All you are asked to risk is your time in understanding the book.