The Idea of a University

The Idea of a University

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by John Henry Newman, Fred Williams
     
 

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No man was ever better qualified to write such a book as The Life of a University than Cardinal Newman was. And the subject has never been more pressing than it is today. In this classic, Newman poses a number of important questions: What is the purpose of education? What does it mean to be educated? What is the role of a university? What is the relationship between

Overview

No man was ever better qualified to write such a book as The Life of a University than Cardinal Newman was. And the subject has never been more pressing than it is today. In this classic, Newman poses a number of important questions: What is the purpose of education? What does it mean to be educated? What is the role of a university? What is the relationship between learning and the life of a society? And where does Catholicism fit in?

The issues Newman examined with incomparable insight continue to be relevant today, one hundred and fifty years after it was first published. This book has been recognized as probably the greatest of its kind, and no one interested in the relationship between religion, learning, culture and politics can afford to neglect it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786109333
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
02/28/1996
Edition description:
Unabridged, 14 Cassettes
Product dimensions:
6.79(w) x 9.57(h) x 2.36(d)

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The Idea Of A University 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am so excited about this book that I want to memorize entire sections of it! Newman's philosophy has completely changed my understanding of the function of a college education. Though a challenging read, this book illuminated my struggle between pursuing a practical college major and taking classes to satisfy my personal curiosities. Newman's comparison of a healthy body to a well-prepared mind and his recognition that better generalists make better specialists are refreshing in today's highly specialized society. I want to recommend this book to everyone who questions what I can practically do with a degree in the study of dead languages and literature. Newman proposes that only the man who learns for the sake of learning will develop his mind fully, and only then will he find satisfaction in his work.