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Breastfeeding And Human Lactation / Edition 4
     

Breastfeeding And Human Lactation / Edition 4

4.5 2
by Jan Riordan
 

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ISBN-10: 0763754323

ISBN-13: 9780763754327

Pub. Date: 06/09/2009

Publisher: Jones & Bartlett Learning

This is THE reference text for lactation consultants. In its Fourth Edition, the text has been completely revised and updated. It includes key concepts, internet resources, evidence-based tables and boxes and is accompanied by a CD-ROM and color insert, both of which accurately depict positioning, the normal breast, and breastfeeding problems.

Overview

This is THE reference text for lactation consultants. In its Fourth Edition, the text has been completely revised and updated. It includes key concepts, internet resources, evidence-based tables and boxes and is accompanied by a CD-ROM and color insert, both of which accurately depict positioning, the normal breast, and breastfeeding problems.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780763754327
Publisher:
Jones & Bartlett Learning
Publication date:
06/09/2009
Edition description:
4E
Pages:
936
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 10.30(h) x 1.50(d)

Table of Contents

Prefacexxi
Acknowledgementsxxiii
Chapter Authorsxxiv
Section 1Historical and Work Perspectives
Chapter 1Tides in Breastfeeding Practice3
Evidence About Breastfeeding Practices3
The Biological Norm in Infant Feeding5
The Replacement of Maternal Breastfeeding5
Technological Innovations in Infant Feeding8
The Prevalence of Breastfeeding12
The Cost of Not Breastfeeding15
The Promotion of Breastfeeding18
Summary24
Key Concepts25
Internet Resources26
References27
Chapter 2Work Strategies and the Lactation Consultant31
History31
Do Lactation Consultants Make a Difference?32
Certification32
Getting a Job as a Lactation Consultant35
LC Education37
Lactation Programs38
Developing a Lactation Program41
The Unique Characteristics of Counseling Breastfeeding Women44
Roles and Responsibilities45
Legal and Ethical Considerations51
Reimbursement53
Private Practice57
Summary60
Key Concepts61
Internet Resources62
References62
Section 2Anatomical and Biological Imperatives
Chapter 3Anatomy and Physiology of Lactation67
Mammogenesis67
Breast Structure69
Variations72
Pregnancy72
Lactogenesis73
Hormonal Influences74
Milk Production79
Autocrine Versus Endocrine79
Galactopoiesis80
Galactorrhea80
Clinical Implications: Mother80
Newborn Oral Development83
Suckling85
Breathing and Suckling87
Frequency of Feedings89
Summary90
Key Concepts90
References92
Chapter 4The Biological Specificity of Breastmilk97
Milk Synthesis and Maturational Changes98
Energy, Volume, and Growth98
Nutritional Values103
Anti-infective Properties111
Chronic Disease Protection115
The Immune System117
Bioactive Components122
Implications for Clinical Practice124
Summary126
Key Concepts126
Internet Resources127
References128
Appendix 4-AComposition of Human Colostrum and Mature Breastmilk136
Chapter 5Drug Therapy and Breastfeeding137
The Alveolar Subunit138
Drug Transfer into Human Milk139
Calculating Infant Exposure143
Minimizing the Risk146
Effect of Medications on Milk Production146
Review of Selected Drug Classes149
Drugs of Abuse158
Radioisotopes159
Radiocontrast Agents159
Summary161
Key Concepts162
Internet Resources162
References162
Chapter 6Viruses and Breastfeeding167
HIV and Infant Feeding167
Exclusive Breastfeeding168
What We Know168
Health-Care Practitioners171
Herpes Simplex Virus172
Chickenpox/Varicella173
Cytomegalovirus175
Rubella176
Hepatitis B176
Hepatitis C176
Human Lymphotropic Virus177
West Nile Virus177
Implications for Practice178
Summary179
Key Concepts179
Internet Resources180
References181
Section 3Prenatal, Perinatal, and Postnatal Periods
Chapter 7Perinatal and Intrapartum Care185
Breastfeeding Preparation185
Early Feedings186
Feeding Positions191
The Infant Who Has Not Latched-On192
The 34 to 38 "Weeker"197
Feeding Methods198
Nipple Shields200
Hypoglycemia201
Cesarean Births204
Breast Engorgement205
Breast Edema206
Hand Expression207
Clinical Implications209
Summary212
Key Concepts212
Internet Resources214
References214
Chapter 8Postpartum Care217
Hydration and Nutrition in the Neonate217
Nipple Pain221
Engorgement + Milk Stasis = Involution228
Breast Massage228
Clothing, Leaking, Bras, and Breast Pads228
Infant Concerns230
Multiple Infants236
Breastfeeding During Pregnancy240
Clinical Implications241
Summary242
Key Concepts242
Internet Resources242
References243
Chapter 9Breast-Related Problems247
Nipple Variations247
Plugged Ducts248
Mastitis250
Breast Abscess254
Breast and Nipple Rashes, Lesions, and Eczema254
Candidiasis (Thrush)255
Breast Pain260
Vasospasm260
Milk Blister261
Mammoplasty261
Breast Lumps and Surgery265
Bleeding from the Breast267
Breast Cancer268
Clinical Implications270
Summary271
Key Concepts271
Internet Resources273
References273
Chapter 10Low Intake in the Breastfed Infant: Maternal and Infant Considerations277
Factors That Influence Maternal Milk Production277
Normal Milk Intake and Rate of Gain279
US Growth Curves280
Low Intake and Low Milk Supply: Definitions and Incidence of Occurrence282
Abnormal Patterns of Growth: The Baby Who Appears Healthy286
Abnormal Patterns of Growth: The Baby with Obvious Illness292
Maternal Considerations: The Mother Who Appears Healthy293
Maternal Considerations: Obvious Illness296
History, Physical Exam, and Differential Diagnosis296
Clinical Management297
Intervention297
Special Techniques for Management of Low Intake or Low Supply300
Summary305
Key Concept306
Internet Resources307
References307
Chapter 11Jaundice and the Breastfed Baby311
Neonatal Jaundice312
Assessment of Jaundice313
Postnatal Pattern of Jaundice314
Breastmilk Jaundice314
Breast-Nonfeeding Jaundice314
Bilirubin Encephalopathy316
Evaluation of Jaundice316
Management of Jaundice318
Key Concepts319
Internet Resources320
References320
Chapter 12Breast Pumps and Other Technologies323
Concerns of Mothers323
Stimulating the Milk-Ejection Reflex324
Hormonal Considerations328
Pumps330
A Comparison of Pumps332
Simultaneous and/or Sequential Pumping338
Flanges338
Miscellaneous Pumps342
Clinical Implications Regarding Breast Pumps342
When Pumps Cause Problems345
Sample Guidelines for Pumping345
Common Pumping Problems347
Nipple Shields349
Breast Shells354
Feeding-Tube Devices355
Summary357
Key Concepts358
Internet Resources361
References361
Appendix 12-AManufacturers/Distributors of Breast Pumps365
Chapter 13Breastfeeding the Preterm Infant367
Suitability of Human Milk for Preterm Infants367
Mothers of Preterm Infants368
Rates of Breastfeeding Initiation and Duration370
Research-Based Lactation Support Services370
Models for Hospital-Based Lactation Support Services371
Initiation of Mechanical Milk Expression372
Maintaining Maternal Milk Volume376
Evidence-Based Guidelines for Milk Collection, Storage, and Feeding378
Special Issues Regarding the Feeding of EMM380
Feeding at Breast in the NICU384
Discharge Planning for Postdischarge Breastfeeding396
Postdischarge Breastfeeding Management398
Summary399
Key Concepts399
Internet Resources400
References401
Appendix 13-AThe Preterm Infant Breastfeeding Behavior Scale (PIBBS)407
Chapter 14Donor Human Milk Banking409
Defining Donor Milk Banking409
A Brief History of Human Milk Banking409
Donor Human Milk Banking Beyond North America412
The Benefits of Banked Donor Human Milk413
Clinical Uses414
Current Practice420
Policy Statements Supporting the Use of Banked Donor Human Milk425
Summary426
Key Concepts427
Internet Resources427
References427
Appendix 14-AStorage and Handling of Expressed Human Milk432
Section 4Beyond Postpartum
Chapter 15Maternal Nutrition During Lactation437
Maternal Caloric Needs438
Maternal Fluid Needs439
Weight Loss439
Exercise440
Calcium Needs and Bone Loss441
Vegetarian Diets442
Dietary Supplements442
Foods That Pass Into Milk443
Allergens in Breastmilk443
The Goal of the Maternal Diet During Lactation444
Nutrition Basics446
Macronutrients447
Micronutrients448
Clinical Implications449
Summary453
Key Concepts453
Internet Resources454
References454
Chapter 16Women's Health and Breastfeeding459
Alterations in Endocrine and Metabolic Functioning459
Acute Illness and Infections463
Maternal Immunizations465
Surgery465
Donating Blood466
Relactation467
Induced Lactation467
Autoimmune Diseases470
Physically Challenged Mothers472
Headaches475
Postpartum Depression476
Asthma480
Smoking480
Poison Ivy Dermatitis481
Diagnostic Studies Using Radioisotopes481
The Impact of Maternal Illness and Hospitalization482
Summary482
Key Concepts483
Internet Resources484
References484
Chapter 17Maternal Employment and Breastfeeding487
Why Women Work487
Historical Perspective488
The Effect of Work on Breastfeeding488
Strategies to Manage Breastfeeding and Work489
Community Strategies501

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Breastfeeding and Human Lactation 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
PerfectRose More than 1 year ago
This book is an excellent resource for the lactation consultant or someone wishing to gain more information on the subject of lactation. It seems to be geared towards nurses, is not oververly technical, yet is very comprehensive. I have the previous edition and was able to see many of the updates in this new edition. However, with some subjects, revisions seem to have been overlooked. A person new to lactation would probably not even notice. Overall, this is still my favorite resource for lactation.