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Never Pure: Historical Studies of Science as if It Was Produced by People with Bodies, Situated in Time, Space, Culture, and Society, and Struggling for Credibility and Authority
     

Never Pure: Historical Studies of Science as if It Was Produced by People with Bodies, Situated in Time, Space, Culture, and Society, and Struggling for Credibility and Authority

by Steven Shapin
 

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ISBN-10: 0801894212

ISBN-13: 2900801894212

Pub. Date: 04/21/2010

Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press

Steven Shapin Argues that science, for all its immense authority and power, is and always has been a human endeavor, subject to human capacities and limits. Put simply, science has never been pure. To be human is to err, and we understand science better when we recognize it as the laborious achievement of fallible, imperfect, and historically situated human beings.

Overview

Steven Shapin Argues that science, for all its immense authority and power, is and always has been a human endeavor, subject to human capacities and limits. Put simply, science has never been pure. To be human is to err, and we understand science better when we recognize it as the laborious achievement of fallible, imperfect, and historically situated human beings.

Shapin's essays collected here include reflections on the historical relationships between science and common sense, between science and modernity, and between science and the moral order. They explore the relevance of physical and social settings in the making of scientific knowledge, the methods appropriate to understanding science historically, dietetics as a compelling site for historical inquiry, the identity of those who have made scientific knowledge, and the means by which science has acquired credibility and authority.

This wide-ranging and intensely interdisciplinary collection by one of the most distinguished historians and sociologists of science represents some of the leading edges of change in the scholarly understanding of science over the past several decades.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900801894212
Publisher:
Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication date:
04/21/2010
Edition description:
NE
Pages:
568

Table of Contents

Preface vii

1 Lowering the Tone in the History of Science: A Noble Calling 1

Part I Methods and Maxims 15

2 Cordelia's Love: Credibility and the Social, Studies of Science 17

3 How to Be Antiscientific 32

4 Science and Prejudice in Historical Perspective 47

Part II Places and Practices 57

5 The House of Experiment in Seventeenth-century England 59

6 Pump and Circumstance: Robert Boyle's Literary Technology 89

Part III The Scientific Person 117

7 "The Mind Is Its Own Place": Science and Solitude in Seventeenth-century England 119

8 "A Scholar and a Gentleman": The Problematic Identity of the Scientific Practitioner in Seventeenth-century England 142

9 Who Was Robert Hooke? 182

10 Who Is the Industrial Scientist? Commentary from Academic Sociology and from the Shop Floor in the United States, ca. 1900-ca. 1970 212

Part IV The Body of Knowledge and the Knowledge of Body 235

11 The Philosopher and the Chicken: On the Dietetics of Disembodied Knowledge 237

12 How to Eat Like a Gentleman: Dietetics and Ethics in Early Modern England 259

Part V The World of Science and the World of Common Sense 287

13 Trusting George Cheyne: Scientific Expertise, Common Sense, and Moral Authority in Early Eighteenth-century Dietetic Medicine 289

14 Proverbial Economies: How an Understanding of Some Linguistic and Social Features of Common Sense Can Throw Light on More Prestigious Bodies of Knowledge, Science for Example 315

15 Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and Its Therapies 351

Part VI Science and Modernity 375

1 Science and the Modern World 377

Notes 393

Index 541

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