The Manchurian Candidate (7 Cassettes)

The Manchurian Candidate (7 Cassettes)

4.7 9
by Richard Condon, Christopher Hurt
     
 

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Buried deep within the consciousness of Sergeant Raymond Shaw is the mechanism of an assassin--a time bomb ticking toward explosion, controlled by the delicate skill of its Communist masters. Shaw returns from the Korean War to an idolizing and unsuspecting country. In a farcical, uproarious scene, he is greeted amid flashbulbs and frock coats by his power-hungry,

Overview

Buried deep within the consciousness of Sergeant Raymond Shaw is the mechanism of an assassin--a time bomb ticking toward explosion, controlled by the delicate skill of its Communist masters. Shaw returns from the Korean War to an idolizing and unsuspecting country. In a farcical, uproarious scene, he is greeted amid flashbulbs and frock coats by his power-hungry, domineering mother and her politician husband, who have decided to use Shaw's fame to further their own unscrupulous ambitions.Unabridged Audiobook read by Christopher Hurt.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786109036
Publisher:
Blackstone Audio, Inc.
Publication date:
12/28/1995
Edition description:
Unabridged, 7 Cassettes
Product dimensions:
6.54(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.26(d)

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The Manchurian Candidate 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
To sum it up: the original film was better than the novel. Condon gets the pacing all wrong by starting in the middle, then pausing for lengthy flashbacks before getting back on track. Condon also shows disdain for his own characters, like a chatty housewife gossiping about the neighbors, which is cute for a while but gets old eventually. The cold war politics are actually less dated than one would think, and the fact that the story rings so true has kept this book relevant after almost 50 years.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
¿The Manchurian Candidate' a masterpiece of political and psychological horror, inspired by the ridiculous heights of the Cold War and the terror of McCarthyism. An extraordinary film about political agitations, assassinations, and Communist fiddling, probably one of the best politically based fiction movies ever made by Hollywood. It had been out of release immediately following President John F. Kennedy¿s death in 1963, but the film's producers and United Artists decided to call it back for its subject matter resonating with the tragedy and conspiracy surrounding the death of JFK. Fallowing its release in 24th October 1962, the film faced various acquisitions, some critics said the story line was somewhat un-AMERICAN, some thought of it being pro-communist, and in certain countries protesters stigmatized it as rightist propaganda. The film deals with a Communist plot to send a brainwashed American war hero to assassinate a presidential candidate. But the most shocking aspects of the story are who truly sponsored it and who Raymond (the protagonist) is ultimately destined to assassinate. The mind reeling aspect of the film is to watch how the protagonist is relentlessly manipulated by those who use him, while those who want to save him deal with insuperable obstacles. Raymond wouldn't allow himself to enjoy any pleasure in his life. He surely found himself guilty for the crimes he had committed. He was frequently spellbound by his mother and executed every transgression operation his mother wanted him to perpetrate. What was really interesting watching was the character of Raymond's despicable and domineering mother Mrs. Iselin, whose evil amply propels the storyline, the difficulty to believe in her cobwebby evil brilliance. The acme of Momisms: What She Says and What She Really Means. Actress Angela Lansbury portrays a character of a mother who is both scathing and self-deprecating. One of the prime focuses of the story is the obsession with motherhood and the impossible standards which that obsession promotes.Watching Angela Lansbury play her character of a rugged and powerful mother will certainly make any viewer¿s blood run cold. Tone in the way she talks favors the sarcasm and black humor rather than her daunting attitude. Some scenes are too funny to be takes seriously and that is why her character is addictive.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a twisty political satire in the guise of a thriller. If you haven't read the book or seen the movie (the first one; the remake is a waste of time and money.) You're in for a treat with twists and turns you won't see coming up until the end.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have now read the book, and watched both movies, so I can truly say that this is one of the best stories ever written. Some parts are a little slow, but the story is as chilling and realistic as it was in the 50's and 60's.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Condon¿s 1959 novel is a shocking political thriller, as disturbing today as it was then. The very concept of the Far Right being manipulated as a tool of the Far Left may seem outdated in this post-Cold War world, but the reality is, the scenery never really changes, only the labels do. During the Korean War, a Chinese-Russian military intelligence operation captures a patrol of American soldiers and brainwashes the squad leader, Sergeant Raymond Shaw, to act as an assassin who forgets his orders and his bloody deeds once they are done. Neither Raymond nor his fellow soldiers have any idea what¿s happened to them, or to Raymond in particular -- none have any memory of the fact that Raymond murdered two of the men under his command, on the orders of the Chinese, during the period they were held captive. Raymond returns home a hero and recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. He is briefly reunited with his mother, for whom he nurses a vigorous hatred, and her husband, Johnny Iselin, a U.S. Senator patterned loosely after Joe McCarthy. Iselin is buffoonish, conservative, and politically savvy -- a comical character but for the fact that he has serious political ambitions, and the means to carry them out with the help of Raymond¿s supremely controlling mother. With steely determination, she advances Iselin¿s career, destroys Raymond¿s romance with the daughter of a political enemy, then rebuilds it when it suits her purposes. The book is a delightful read, disarmingly entertaining as Condon takes you deeper into the plot that has Raymond as its focal point. On the surface, Condon¿s writing is light, funny and anecdotal, but he employs casual satire to expose the reader to truly disturbing themes. A must read for anyone interested in government, spy stories, and the possibility that things are not what they appear.