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Art of Interactive Design / Edition 1
     

Art of Interactive Design / Edition 1

3.6 3
by Chris Crawford
 

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ISBN-10: 1886411840

ISBN-13: 2901886411844

Pub. Date: 12/15/2002

Publisher: No Starch Press San Francisco, CA

About the Author

Chris Crawford, a former game developer, is the author of the classic The Art of Computer Game Design (Osborne/McGraw-Hill), and the founder of the Game Developers Conference. Crawford lectures at conferences and universities around the world. He is currently at work on Erasmatron, an interactive storytelling project.

Overview

About the Author

Chris Crawford, a former game developer, is the author of the classic The Art of Computer Game Design (Osborne/McGraw-Hill), and the founder of the Game Developers Conference. Crawford lectures at conferences and universities around the world. He is currently at work on Erasmatron, an interactive storytelling project.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901886411844
Publisher:
No Starch Press San Francisco, CA
Publication date:
12/15/2002
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
408

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Art of Interactive Design 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
An amusing book. Perhaps Crawford's most striking suggestion is that a project should be headed by a designer who has an arts background and who is also able to program. To him, this is an ideal, which may take the field decades to achieve. I am dubious as to how necessary this is, in the first place. He claims that it is easier to find someone from the arts and have her learn the rudiments of programming, than vice versa. But in a specialised environment, like engineering, science or education, it may be better for her to hail from that field, so that she can better know what users might want. Granted, though, for a mass market audience, a more general background might be better. When it comes to specific suggestions regarding the design of a program, he has good ideas. Like using progress bars if a task takes longer than ten seconds. Or using first or second person active voice, rather than a third person passive. These do increase the interactivity. The book is somewhat verbose. He writes at length to illustrate his points. But a little brevity may have been possible, without losing any clarity.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are lots of book on how to program or use this bit of software or another, but this book teaches fundemental problems that most authors do not even think about. Some of it seems common sense, until you notice how many websites and programs violate his points and suffer for it. Many of his arguments reason thru problems I have never seen considered in other books. He talks about language and procol design, metaphors for algorithms, adaptable anthopormorphization, ui design in programs, webpages and interactive fiction. However if you already own his 'Understanding Interactivity', (the earlier version of this book) I do not feel that there is enough difference to make buying this one worthwhile.