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Letters Written in France, in the Summer 1790, to a Friend in England / Edition 1
     

Letters Written in France, in the Summer 1790, to a Friend in England / Edition 1

by Helen Maria Williams
 

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ISBN-10: 1551112558

ISBN-13: 2901551112557

Pub. Date: 08/21/2001

Publisher: Broadview Press

An ardent supporter of the French Revolution, the English poet Williams moved to France and eventually wrote an 8-volume history of the Revolution. In this volume Williams's earliest observations on the Revolution are presented in English translation with extensive introductory material both to the volume and to each letter. Fraistat and Lanser (both of the U. of

Overview

An ardent supporter of the French Revolution, the English poet Williams moved to France and eventually wrote an 8-volume history of the Revolution. In this volume Williams's earliest observations on the Revolution are presented in English translation with extensive introductory material both to the volume and to each letter. Fraistat and Lanser (both of the U. of Maryland) also include brief excerpts of other British writers on the Revolution, making this a well-rounded reader for the undergraduate classroom. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901551112557
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
08/21/2001
Series:
Broadview Literary Texts Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
295

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
Helen Maria Williams: A Brief Chronology
Contemporary Historical Events
A Note on the Text

Letters Written in France, in the Summer 1790

Appendix A: Excerpts From Later Volumes of Williams’s Letters from France

  1. Letters from France: Containing Many New Anecdotes (1792)
  2. Letters from France: Containing … Interesting and Original Information, vol. I (1793)
  3. Letters from France: Containing … Interesting and Original Information, vol. II (1793)
  4. Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France [May 1793-July 1794], vol. I (1795)
  5. Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France [May 1793-July 1794], vol. II (1795)
  6. Letters Containing a Sketch of the Scenes … during the Tyranny of Robespierre (1795)
  7. Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France [July 1794-95] (1796)

Appendix B: Selected Poetry by Williams

  1. “To Sensibility”
  2. A Poem on the Bill Lately Passed for Regulating the Slave Trade
  3. “The Bastille, A Vision” (from Julia, a Novel; Interspersed with Some Poetical Pieces)
  4. A Farewell, for Two Years, to England. A Poem

Appendix C: Critical Reviews of Letters Written in France

  1. The Analytical Review
  2. The General Magazine
  3. The Monthly Review
  4. The Universal Magazine
  5. The Critical Review
  6. The Gentleman’s Magazine
  7. The English Review

Appendix D: Other Contemporary Responses to Letters Written in France

  1. Edward Jerningham, “On Reading ‘Letters Written from France’”
  2. Hester Thrale Piozzi, from Thraliana
  3. Two Letters by Anna Seward
  4. Society of Friends of the Constitution at Rouen
  5. Laetitia Matilda Hawkins, from Letters on the Female Mind
  6. William Wordsworth, from The Prelude (1805), Book IX

Appendix E: Contemporary Responses to Williams

  1. William Wordsworth
  2. James Boswell
  3. The Anti-Jacobin Review
  4. Mary Pilkington
  5. Henry Crabb Robinson
  6. Williams’s Obituary in the Gentleman’s Magazine

Appendix F: The French Revolution: Selected Primary Documents

  1. Declaration of The Rights of Man and Citizen
  2. Olympe de Gouges, “Declaration of the Rights of Woman and Female Citizen”
  3. From Address to the National Assembly Supporting Abolition of the Slave Trade
  4. The Fete de la Federation as described by the London Times
  5. Beneficial Effects of the French Revolution

Appendix G: The French Revolution: Selected Early British Responses

  1. Richard Price, from A Discourse on the Love of Our Country
  2. Edmund Burke, from Reflections on the Revolution in France
  3. Mary Wbllstonecraft, from A Vindication of the Rights of Men
  4. Thomas Paine, from The Rights of Man
  5. Hannah More, from Village Politics
  6. Anna Barbauld, “To a Great Nation”
  7. Mary Alcock,“Instructions … for the Mob in England”

Selected Bibliography

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