Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure / Edition 2

Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure / Edition 2

by Robert Cryer
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521135818

ISBN-13: 2900521135817

Pub. Date: 07/31/2010

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

By offering both a comprehensive update and new material reflecting the continuing development of the subject, this continues to be the leading textbook on international criminal law. Its experienced author team draws on its combined expertise as teachers, scholars and practitioners to offer an authoritative survey of the field. The third edition contains new

…  See more details below

Overview

By offering both a comprehensive update and new material reflecting the continuing development of the subject, this continues to be the leading textbook on international criminal law. Its experienced author team draws on its combined expertise as teachers, scholars and practitioners to offer an authoritative survey of the field. The third edition contains new material on the theory of international criminal law, the practice of international criminal tribunals, the developing case law on principles of liability and procedures and new practice on immunities. It offers valuable supporting online materials such as case studies, worked examples and study guides. Retaining its comprehensive coverage, clarity and critical analysis, it remains essential reading for all in the field.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900521135817
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
07/31/2010
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
684

Table of Contents

Preface

Table of Cases

Table of Treaties and other International Instruments

Table of Abbreviations

Part A: Introduction 1

1 Introduction: What is International Criminal Law? 3

1.1 International criminal law 3

1.2 Other concepts of international criminal law 5

1.3 Sources of international criminal law 9

1.4 International criminal law and other areas of law 13

1.5 A body of criminal law 16

2 The Objectives of International Criminal Law 22

2.1 Introduction 22

2.2 The aims of international criminal justice 23

2.3 Broader goals 30

2.4 Other critiques of criminal accountability 36

Part B: Prosecutions In National Courts 41

3 Jurisdiction 43

3.1 Introduction 43

3.2 The forms of jurisdiction 43

3.3 Conceptual matters 45

3.4 The 'traditional' heads of jurisdiction 46

3.5 Universal jurisdiction 50

4 National Prosecutions of International Crimes 64

4.1 Introduction 64

4.2 National prosecutions 64

4.3 State obligations to prosecute or extradite 69

4.4 Domestic criminal law and criminal jurisdiction 73

4.5 Statutory limitations 77

4.6 The Non-retroactivity principle 79

4.7 Ne bis in idem or double jeopardy 80

4.8 Practical obstacles to national prosecutions 82

5 State Cooperation with Respect to National Proceedings 85

5.1 Introduction 85

5.2 International agreements 86

5.3 Some basic features 87

5.4 Extradition 93

5.5 Mutual legal assistance 102

5.6 Transfer of proceedings 104

5.7 Enforcement of penalties 105

Part C: International Prosecutions 107

6 The History of International Criminal Prosecutions: Nuremberg and Toyko 109

6.1 Introduction 109

6.2 The commission on the responsibility of the authors of the war 109

6.3 The Nuremberg International Military Tribunal 111

6.4 The Tokyo International Military Tribunal 115

6.5 Control Council Law No. 10 trials and military commissions in the Pacific sphere 119

7 The ad hoc International Criminal Tribunals 122

7.1 Introduction 122

7.2 The International Criminal Tribunal for Yugoslavia 122

7.3 The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda 135

8 The International Criminal Court 144

8.1 Introduction 144

8.2 The creation of the ICC 144

8.3 Structure and composition of the ICC 149

8.4 Crimes within the jurisdiction of the ICC 150

8.5 Applicable law 152

8.6 Complementarity and other grounds of inadmissibility 153

8.7 Initiation of proceedings (the 'trigger mechanisms') 163

8.8 Jurisdiction: personal, territorial and temporal 166

8.9 Deferral of investigation or prosecution: Article 16 169

8.10 Enforcement of the ICC's decisions 170

8.11 Opposition to the ICC 171

8.12 Appraisal 178

9 Other Courts with International Elements 181

9.1 Introduction 181

9.2 Courts established by agreement between the United States and a State 182

9.3 Courts established by the United Nations or other international administration 188

9.4 Courts established by a State with international support 194

9.5 Lockerbie: an ad hoc solution for a particular incident 196

9.6 Relationship with the ICC 197

9.7 Appraisal 197

Part D: Substantive Law Of International Crimes 201

10 Genocide 203

10.1 Introduction 203

10.2 The protected groups 208

10.3 Material elements 213

10.4 Mental elements 220

10.5 Other modes of participation 228

11 Crimes Against Humanity 230

11.1 Introduction 230

11.2 Common elements (the contextual threshold) 234

11.3 Prohibited acts 245

12 War Crimes 267

12.1 Introduction 267

12.2 Common issues 279

12.3 Specific offences 289

13 Aggression 312

13.1 Introduction 312

13.2 Material elements 318

13.3 Mental elements 327

13.4 Prosecution of aggression in the ICC 328

14 Transitional Crimes, Terrorism and Torture 334

14.1 Introduction 334

14.2 Terrorism 336

14.3 Torture 352

Part E: Principles And Procedures Of International Prosecutions 359

15 General Principles of Liability 361

15.1 Introduction 361

15.2 Perpetration/commission 362

15.3 Joint criminal enterprise 367

15.4 Aiding and abetting 374

15.5 Ordering, instigating, soliciting, inducing and inciting 377

15.6 Planning, preparation, attempt and conspiracy 382

15.7 Mental elements 384

15.8 Command/superior responsibility 387

16 Defences/Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility 402

16.1 Introduction 402

16.2 The ICC Statute and defences 404

16.3 Mental incapacity 405

16.4 Intoxication 406

16.5 Self-defence, defence of others and of property 408

16.6 Duress and necessity 410

16.7 Mistake of fact and law 414

16.8 Superior orders 415

16.9 Other 'defences' 420

17 Procedures of International Criminal Investigations and Prosecutions 425

17.1 International criminal procedures 425

17.2 International criminal proceedings and human rights 430

17.3 Actors in the proceedings and their roles 436

17.4 Jurisdiction and admissibility procedures 441

17.5 Commencement and discontinuance of a criminal investigation 443

17.6 The criminal investigation 445

17.7 Coercive measures 447

17.8 Prosecution and indictment 454

17.9 Pre-trial proceedings - preparations for trial 460

17.10 Evidentiary rules 464

17.11 Admission of guilt, guilty pleas, plea bargaining 467

17.12 Trial and judgment 469

17.13 Appeals proceedings 471

17.14 Revision 474

17.15 Offences against the administration of justice 475

17.16 Some observations 476

18 Victims in the International Criminal Process 478

18.1 Introduction 478

18.2 Definition of victims 481

18.3 Protection of victims and witnesses 481

18.4 Victim participation in ICC criminal proceedings 484

18.5 Reparations to victims 490

18.6 An assessment 491

19 Sentencing and Penalties 494

19.1 International punishment of crimes 494

19.2 Purposes of sentencing 496

19.3 Sentencing practice 498

19.4 Sentencing procedures 502

19.5 Pardon, early release and review of sentence 503

19.6 Enforcement 504

Part F: Relationship Between National And International Systems 507

20 State Cooperation with the International Courts and Tribunals 509

20.1 Characteristics of the cooperation regimes 509

20.2 Obligation to cooperate 510

20.3 Non-States Parties and international organizations 515

20.4 Non-compliance 517

20.5 Cooperation and the ICC complementarity principle 519

20.6 Authority to seek cooperation and defence rights 519

20.7 Arrest and surrender 520

20.8 Other forms of legal assistance 522

20.9 Domestic implementation 526

20.10 An assessment 528

21 Immunities 531

21.1 Introduction 531

21.2 Functional immunity and national courts 538

21.3 Functional immunity and international courts 545

21.4 Personal immunity and national courts 545

21.5 Personal immunity and international courts 549

21.6 Conclusion 558

22 Alternatives and Complements to Criminal Prosecution 561

22.1 Introduction 561

22.2 Amnesties 563

22.3 Truth commissions 571

22.4 Lustration 575

22.5 Reparations and civil claims 576

22.6 Local justice mechanisms 576

23 The Future of International Criminal Law 579

23.1 Introduction 579

23.2 International courts and tribunals 579

23.3 Developments in national prosecutions of international crimes 580

23.4 The trend towards accountability 582

23.5 The development of international criminal law 585

23.6 The path forward (or back?) 587

Index 591

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >