Introduction to Computer Security / Edition 1

Introduction to Computer Security / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Matt Bishop
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321247442

ISBN-13: 9780321247445

Pub. Date: 10/29/2004

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

In this authoritative book, widely respected practitioner and teacher Matt Bishop presents a clear and useful introduction to the art and science of information security. Bishop's insights and realistic examples will help any practitioner or student understand the crucial links between security theory and the day-to-day security challenges of IT environments.…  See more details below

Overview

In this authoritative book, widely respected practitioner and teacher Matt Bishop presents a clear and useful introduction to the art and science of information security. Bishop's insights and realistic examples will help any practitioner or student understand the crucial links between security theory and the day-to-day security challenges of IT environments.

Bishop explains the fundamentals of security: the different types of widely used policies, the mechanisms that implement these policies, the principles underlying both policies and mechanisms, and how attackers can subvert these tools--as well as how to defend against attackers. A practicum demonstrates how to apply these ideas and mechanisms to a realistic company.

Coverage includes

  • Confidentiality, integrity, and availability
  • Operational issues, cost-benefit and risk analyses, legal and human factors
  • Planning and implementing effective access control
  • Defining security, confidentiality, and integrity policies
  • Using cryptography and public-key systems, and recognizing their limits
  • Understanding and using authentication: from passwords to biometrics
  • Security design principles: least-privilege, fail-safe defaults, open design, economy of mechanism, and more
  • Controlling information flow through systems and networks
  • Assuring security throughout the system lifecycle
  • Malicious logic: Trojan horses, viruses, boot sector and executable infectors, rabbits, bacteria, logic bombs--and defenses against them
  • Vulnerability analysis, penetration studies, auditing, and intrusion detection and prevention
  • Applying security principles to networks, systems, users, and programs

Introduction to Computer Security is adapted from Bishop's comprehensive and widely praised book, Computer Security: Art and Science. This shorter version of the original work omits much mathematical formalism, making it more accessible for professionals and students who have a less formal mathematical background, or for readers with a more practical than theoretical interest.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321247445
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
10/29/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
784
Product dimensions:
7.75(w) x 9.62(h) x 1.19(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Preface.

Goals.

Philosophy.

Organization.

Differences Between this Book and Computer Security: Art and Science.

Special Acknowledgment.

Acknowledgments.

1. An Overview of Computer Security.

The Basic Components.

Threats.

Policy and Mechanism.

Assumptions and Trust.

Assurance.

Operational Issues.

Human Issues.

Tying It All Together.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

2. Access Control Matrix.

Protection State.

Access Control Matrix Model.

Protection State Transitions.

Conditional Commands.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

3. Foundational Results.

The General Question.

Basic Results.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

4. Security Policies.

Security Policies.

Types of Security Policies.

The Role of Trust.

Types of Access Control.

Example: Academic Computer Security Policy.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

5. Confidentiality Policies.

Goals of Confidentiality Policies.

The Bell-LaPadula Model.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

6. Integrity Policies.

Goals.

Biba Integrity Model.

Clark-Wilson Integrity Model.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

7. Hybrid Policies.

Chinese Wall Model.

Bell-LaPadula and Chinese Wall Models.

Clinical Information Systems Security Policy.

Originator Controlled Access Control.

Role-Based Access Control.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

8. Basic Cryptography.

What Is Cryptography?

Classical Cryptosystems.

Public Key Cryptography.

Cryptographic Checksums.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

9. Key Management.

Session and Interchange Keys.

Key Exchange.

Cryptographic Key Infrastructures.

Storing and Revoking Keys.

Digital Signatures.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

10. Cipher Techniques.

Problems.

Stream and Block Ciphers.

Networks and Cryptography.

Example Protocols.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

11. Authentication.

Authentication Basics.

Passwords.

Challenge-Response.

Biometrics.

Location.

Multiple Methods.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

12. Design Principles.

Overview.

Design Principles.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

13. Representing Identity.

What Is Identity?

Files and Objects.

Users.

Groups and Roles.

Naming and Certificates.

Identity on the Web.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

14. Access Control Mechanisms.

Access Control Lists.

Capabilities.

Locks and Keys.

Ring-Based Access Control.

Propagated Access Control Lists.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

15. Information Flow.

Basics and Background.

Compiler-Based Mechanisms.

Execution-Based Mechanisms.

Example Information Flow Controls.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

16. Confinement Problem.

The Confinement Problem.

Isolation.

Covert Channels.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

17. Introduction to Assurance.

Assurance and Trust.

Building Secure and Trusted Systems.

Building Security In or Adding Security Later.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

18. Evaluating Systems.

Goals of Formal Evaluation.

TCSEC: 19831999.

FIPS 140: 1994Present.

The Common Criteria: 1998Present.

SSE-CMM: 1997Present.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

19. Malicious Logic.

Introduction.

Trojan Horses.

Computer Viruses.

Computer Worms.

Other Forms of Malicious Logic.

Defenses.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

20. Vulnerability Analysis.

Introduction.

Penetration Studies.

Vulnerability Classification.

Frameworks.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

21. Auditing.

Definitions.

Anatomy of an Auditing System.

Designing an Auditing System.

A Posteriori Design.

Auditing Mechanisms.

Examples: Auditing File Systems.

Audit Browsing.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

22. Intrusion Detection.

Principles.

Basic Intrusion Detection.

Models.

Architecture.

Organization of Intrusion Detection Systems.

Intrusion Response.

Summary.

Further reading.

Exercises.

23. Network Security.

Introduction.

Policy Development.

Network Organization.

Availability and Network Flooding.

Anticipating Attacks.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

24. System Security.

Introduction.

Policy.

Networks.

Users.

Authentication.

Processes.

Files.

Retrospective.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

25. User Security.

Policy.

Access.

Files and Devices.

Processes.

Electronic Communications.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

26. Program Security.

Introduction.

Requirements and Policy.

Design.

Refinement and Implementation.

Common Security-Related Programming Problems.

Testing, Maintenance, and Operation.

Distribution.

Conclusion.

Summary.

Further Reading.

Exercises.

27. Lattices.

Basics.

Lattices.

Exercises.

28. The Extended Euclidean Algorithm.

The Euclidean Algorithm.

The Extended Euclidean Algorithm.

Solving ax mod n = 1.

Solving ax mod n = b.

Exercises.

29. Virtual Machines.

Virtual Machine Structure.

Virtual Machine Monitor.

Exercises.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Introduction to Computer Security 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Most books on computer security describe and show how to use cryptography. But often due to lack of space and audience expertise, they often do not give any detailed theory of cryptosystems. There is relatively little maths in such books. In turn, cryptography books fall into roughly two piles. One is highly mathematical and abstract; deliberately independent of any operating system or implementation. The other uses those theorems from the previous type of book, and is more tied to some software package that implements them. Bishop's book stands differently. The level of the maths and the notation and the rigour with which he describes the cryptosystems would not be out of place in an algorithms book. But it is not all maths. There are chapters on Identity and on Access Control Mechanisms that are traditional sysadmin-type discussions. Veterans of running DEC's VMS machines will see much familiar material. But these discussions are also characterised by a level of analysis uncommonly seen in most sysadmin books. Bishop tries to show how behind such things like Access Control Lists, there is a systematic logic. Other books that might be tied to a given operating system or package might bury you in details, and obscure a general model. If you have wanted to dig deeper into the subject and have good background in discrete maths, Bishop is worth reading.