Black Death

Black Death

4.0 1
by Philip Ziegler
     
 

ISBN-10: 0061315508

ISBN-13: 9780061315503

Pub. Date: 05/28/1971

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

A series of natural disasters in the Orient during the fourteenth century brought about the most devastating period of death and destruction in European history. The epidemic killed one-third of Europe's people over a period of three years, and the resulting social and economic upheaval was on a scale unparalleled in all of recorded history. Synthesizing the

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Overview

A series of natural disasters in the Orient during the fourteenth century brought about the most devastating period of death and destruction in European history. The epidemic killed one-third of Europe's people over a period of three years, and the resulting social and economic upheaval was on a scale unparalleled in all of recorded history. Synthesizing the records of contemporary chroniclers and the work of later historians, Philip Ziegler offers a critically acclaimed overview of this crucial epoch in a single masterly volume. The Black Death vividly and comprehensively brings to light the full horror of this uniquely catastrophic event that hastened the disintegration of an age.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061315503
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/28/1971
Series:
Harper Perennial
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
5.31(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.72(d)

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Black Death 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Philip Ziegler's history of the plague that struck Europe in the fourteenth century is a great academic piece. He examins many aspects of the era, always prodding for the cause and effect results. His use of the fictional town in the book does not retract from his overall success, but rather enhances the readers enjoyment of it. His conclusions of the effects the plague had on the Church are generally well thought out and correct, but I do take issue with one of his assertions. He states, possibly off the cuff, that the plague in some way made man question transbustantiation of the eurcharist. I'm not 100% sure of this assertion or his ability to prove it. The arguement over transubstantiation seems to really come out of the sixteenth century, when a large body of religiously minded clerics and priests began to question the doctrine. He uses many statistics which give weight to his arguement, but also makes it dry at times. This book is quite useful for academic purposes, but I do not believe everyday history buffs will like the work entirely. Ziegler's greatest accomplishment is how he presents the plague's effect on people, culture, class, and order. The medieval mind was much more complicated, as he points out, and was subject to the terrors of the plague. It was a turning point in history, not because it made revolutions, but because it planted the seeds of questioning and discord. The plague did not lead to the problems which faced Europeans after 1349, but played an instrumental role in those challenges. Overall this is a good book and one that serves well the historical discussion on the plague.