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History of the Arab Peoples
     

History of the Arab Peoples

4.3 3
by Albert Hourani, Harvard Univ Press (Other)
 

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Encyclopedic and panoramic in its scope, this fascinating work chronicles the rich spiritual, political, and cultural institutions of Arab history through 13 centuries.

Overview

Encyclopedic and panoramic in its scope, this fascinating work chronicles the rich spiritual, political, and cultural institutions of Arab history through 13 centuries.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446393928
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
04/28/1992
Series:
Belknap Series
Pages:
551
Product dimensions:
5.06(w) x 7.92(h) x 1.27(d)

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A History of the Arab Peoples 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
very thoughtfull analysis of the history of the region. It covers complicated ground in a very readible manner. Buy it
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a concise introduction to the history of the Arab people. It is fairly easy to read, yet comprehensive; interesting, yet dispassionate. Albert Hourani does an excellent job presenting an overall picture of Arab history and society. I particularly enjoyed how this book considers history as more than a mere collection of events and dates or the conquests of kings. Rather, for every historical period, it attempts to paint a picture of the lives of ordinary people. Thus we learn about education, religion, law, marriage, and other aspects of society. This is a major strength of the book. Naturally, in a book about Arab history, a great deal of emphasis is put on Islamic religion, which is perhaps the most potent force shaping Arab history and culture. In a way therefore this book also offers an excellent introduction to Islam and Islamic history. Nevertheless, I would have liked to see more material about pre-Islamic times. Furthermore, while the title ¿Arab peoples¿ acknowledges the fact that most of the modern-day ¿Arabs¿ are descended from non-Arabs who at some point adopted Arab language and culture, this point is not made explicit in the text, and the pre-Arab history of these peoples is ignored. Having said that, I admit that it is impossible to include any more information about Arab history in the same number of pages (500), making this book a definite accomplishment. It is an excellent and readable introduction to Arab history, and a lead to other more specialized books (listed in the 27-page bibliography). The index alone reads like a who¿s who in Arab history.