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Death March (YOURDON Press Series) / Edition 2
     

Death March (YOURDON Press Series) / Edition 2

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by Edward Yourdon
 

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ISBN-10: 013143635X

ISBN-13: 2900131436359

Pub. Date: 12/06/2003

Publisher: Prentice Hall

The complete software developer's guide to surviving projects that are "doomed to fail."


In the course of a career, practically every software developer and manager will encounter projects with outrageous staffing, scheduling, budgeting, or feature constraints: projects that seem destined to fail. In the wake of re-engineering, such "Death

Overview

The complete software developer's guide to surviving projects that are "doomed to fail."


In the course of a career, practically every software developer and manager will encounter projects with outrageous staffing, scheduling, budgeting, or feature constraints: projects that seem destined to fail. In the wake of re-engineering, such "Death March" projects have become a way of life in many organizations.



  • Surviving projects that are "doomed to fail"!

  • Negotiating the best deal up-front.

  • Managing people and setting priorities.

  • Choosing tools and technologies.

  • When it's time to walk away.


Now, best-selling author Edward Yourdon brings his unique technology and management insights to the worst IS projects, showing how to maximize your chances of success--and, if nothing else, how to make sure your career survives them.


Yourdon walks step-by-step through the entire project life cycle, showing both managers and developers how to deal with the politics of "Death March" projects--and how to make the most of the available resources, including people, tools, processes, and technology.


Learn how to negotiate for the flexibility you need, how to set priorities that make sense--and when to simply walk away. Discover how to recognize the tell-tale signs of a "Death March" project--or an organization that breeds them.


If you've ever been asked to do the impossible, Death March is the book you've been waiting for.


Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900131436359
Publisher:
Prentice Hall
Publication date:
12/06/2003
Series:
Yourdon Press Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
230

Table of Contents

1. Introduction.
Death March Defined. Categories of Death March Projects. Why Do Death March Projects Happen? Why Do People Participate in Death March Projects? Summary.

2. Politics.
Identifying the Political “Players” Involved in the Project. Determining the Basic Nature of the Project. Identifying the Levels of Commitment of Project Participants. Summary.

3. Negotiations.
Rational Negotiations. Identifying Acceptable Trade-offs. Negotiating Games. Negotiating Strategies. What to Do When Negotiating Fails.

4. People in Death March Projects.
Hiring and Staffing Issues. Loyalty, Commitment, Motivation, and Rewards. The Importance of Communication. Team-Building Issues. Workplace Conditions for Death March Projects. Summary.

5. Processes.
The Concept of “Triage” . The Importance of Requirements Management. SEI, ISO-9000, and Formal vs Informal Processes. “Good Enough” Software. Best Practices and Worst Practices. The “Daily Build” Concept. Risk Management. Summary.

6. Tools and Technology.
The Minimal Toolset. Tools and Process. The Risks of Choosing New Tools. Summary.

7. Death March as a Way of Life.
Why Would Death March Projects Become the Norm? Establishing a Death March “Culture” . Death March Training. The Concept of “WarGames” . Summary.

Index.

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Death March 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The story of my life
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is going to be as influential as 'The Mythical Man-Month'. Yourdon tackles some issues that need to be addressed in the modern software development industry. He does offer some insightful analysis as to why things get as bad as they do, and his strategies and recommendations are useful. However, this book is typical of 'guru' books in that there's enough useful information in it for few brilliant articles, but not enough to fill a whole book. The book is 230 pages long but a good quarter of it is verbatim copy of E-mails Mr. Yourdon received from other contributors. It is right and appropriate for him to cite his sources, but there has to be a better way of doing it. There's also a fair bit of filler material: white space, bulleted lists, diagrams, and unnecessary repetition. The writing is cumbersome, such that if there's a choice between a simple word and a complex word ('use' and 'utilize', for example) Yourdon picks the bigger word every time as if he's getting paid by the letter. The personal anecdotes and stories are interesting, but I buy technical books for useful content, not to 'chew the fat' with the author.