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Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power
     

Thomas Jefferson and Executive Power

by Jeremy D. Bailey
 

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ISBN-10: 0521868319

ISBN-13: 9780521868310

Pub. Date: 07/31/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This book examines Thomas Jefferson's attempt to combine respect for a fundamental constitution with the fact that no set of laws can foresee every event. His solution to this problem offers a democratic, yet strong, alternative to the more common, Hamiltonian solution. Jefferson scholars have long written of 'two Jeffersons,' one before he became president and one

Overview

This book examines Thomas Jefferson's attempt to combine respect for a fundamental constitution with the fact that no set of laws can foresee every event. His solution to this problem offers a democratic, yet strong, alternative to the more common, Hamiltonian solution. Jefferson scholars have long written of 'two Jeffersons,' one before he became president and one after he became president. The first was opposed to a strong executive, while the second embraced one out of necessity. This book challenges this account. It presents Jefferson's understanding of executive power, which, though it developed over time, pointed to an executive that was both democratic and powerful.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521868310
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
07/31/2007
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.91(d)

Table of Contents

1. 'The execution of laws is more important than the making of them': reconciling executive energy with democracy; 2. Executive power and the Virginia executive; 3. Executive power and the constitution of 1787; 4. 'To place before mankind the common sense of the subject': declarations of principle; 5. The real revolution of 1800: Jefferson's transformation of the inaugural address; 6. To 'produce a union of the powers of the whole': Jefferson's transformation of the appointment and removal powers; 7. The Louisiana Purchase; 8. To 'complete their entire union of opinion': the twelfth amendment as amendment to end all amendments; 9. 'To bring their wills to a point of union and effect': declarations and presidential speech; 10. Development and difficulties.

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