The Purposeful Argument: A Practical Guide, Brief Edition

The Purposeful Argument: A Practical Guide, Brief Edition

by Harry Phillips, Patricia Bostian
     
 

ISBN-10: 1428264000

ISBN-13: 9781428264007

Pub. Date: 01/01/2011

Publisher: Cengage Learning

THE PURPOSEFUL ARGUMENT: A PRACTICAL GUIDE, BRIEF 1st Edition, encourages students to recognize where argument fits into their lives and how it can be a practical response to the issues in a variety of communities—School, Workplace, Family, Neighborhood, Social-Cultural, Consumer, and Concerned Citizen. When students are encouraged to honor and respond to

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Overview

THE PURPOSEFUL ARGUMENT: A PRACTICAL GUIDE, BRIEF 1st Edition, encourages students to recognize where argument fits into their lives and how it can be a practical response to the issues in a variety of communities—School, Workplace, Family, Neighborhood, Social-Cultural, Consumer, and Concerned Citizen. When students are encouraged to honor and respond to issues that matter to them, their investment becomes evident and their writing purposeful. Students learn how argument can become an essential negotiating skill in their lives—both in school and beyond. With a focus on accessibility, THE PURPOSEFUL ARGUMENT relies on clear explanations, explicit examples, and practical step-by-step exercises that guide students through the process of building an argument.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781428264007
Publisher:
Cengage Learning
Publication date:
01/01/2011
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

Part I: HOW GOOD ARGUMENTS WORK. 1. Argue In Real Life. What Argument Is and What Argument Is Not. Recognize Where Argument is Appropriate in Real Life. Argue About Issues that Matter to You. Establish Local Context for an Issue Using the Research Process. Find Your Place Among Others: Negotiate Opposition. Stake and Defend Your Claim. Vary the Support You Bring to an Argument. Structure Your Argument. Recognize Why Arguments Break Down. Take Ownership of Your Argument. 2. Choose an Issue. Determine What Matters to You and Why. Choose an Issue within a Topic. Define Your Audience. Argue at the Right Moment. Getting Started. 3. Develop a Research Plan. Collect a basic reference desk and use encyclopedias profitably. Gather Search Terms. Use search engines to find Internet sources on the Surface Web and on the Deep Web. Perform keyword queries. Find news sites and use RSS feeds to receive updates. Find and use databases in libraries. Find and use primary, government, and multimedia sources. Find books. 4. Evaluate, Read, and Use Resources in Your Writing. Take Notes, Read Critically, and Evaluate Internet Sites. Take Notes, Read Critically, and Evaluate Articles. Take Notes and Read Books Critically. Take Notes and Evaluate Primary Sources. Introduce and Comment on Sources. Quote and Cite Quotations. Summarize and Cite Summaries. Paraphrase and Cite Paraphrases. Avoid Plagiarism. Documentation: Works Cited Page. 5. Read Critically and Avoid Fallacies. Avoid Fallacies of Choice. Avoid Fallacies of Support. Avoid Fallacies of Emotion. Avoid Fallacies of Inconsistency. Part II: HOW TO PLAN, STRUCTURE AND DELIVER AN ARGUMENT. 6. Negotiate Opposition. Why the Opposition Matters. Resist Easy Generalizations. Listen to Local Voices. Summarize Other Voices Fairly. Value Expertise Over Advocacy. Avoid Bias When You Summarize. Find Points of Overlap. Respond to Other Views. 7. Explore an Issue. Prewrite on Your Issue. Develop an Argument Strategy. Use Definitions. Discover Causes or Consequences. Present Comparisons. Propose a Solution. Evaluate Your Claim. Write an Exploratory Essay. 8. Kinds of Argument. Structure an Argument to Fit Your Purpose. Toulmin-Based Argument. Middle Ground Argument. Rogerian Argument. Argument Based on a Microhistory. 9. Build Arguments. How a Claim Functions. Five Kinds of Claims. Use Reasons to Support Your Claim.. Build Body Paragraphs Around Reasons. Use Qualifiers to Make Your Argument Believable. Justify Your Claim with a Warrant. Use Your Audience to Construct a Warrant. Use Backing to Support a Warrant. Respond to Audience Reservations to Make a Warrant Believable. 10. Support an Argument with Fact (Logos), Credibility (Ethos), and Emotion (Pathos). Field Specific Support. Use All Three General Kinds of Support. Use Support Based on Facts and Research (Logos). Use Support to Establish Your Credibility (Ethos). Use Support to Create Emotion (Pathos). Part III: HOW TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF YOUR ARGUMENT: A STYLE GUIDE. 11. Enhance Your Argument with Visuals and Humor. What Are Visual Arguments? Read Visual Arguments. Use Humor in Your Argument. When Is Humor Appropriate? 12. Develop and Edit Argument Structure and Style. Consider Your Argument's Claim. Introduce Your Opposition. Create Strong Introductions. Write Memorable Conclusions. Edit and Organize Your Argument's Support. Supply a Strong Title. \

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