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Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, the Unnamable / Edition 1
     

Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, the Unnamable / Edition 1

4.8 4
by Samuel Beckett
 

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ISBN-10: 0802150918

ISBN-13: 2900802150911

Pub. Date: 01/28/1994

Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.

Few works of contemporary literature are so universally acclaimed as central to our understanding of the human experience as Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett's famous trilogy. Molloy, the first of these masterpieces, appeared in French in 1951. It was followed seven months later by Malone Dies and two years later by The Unnamable. All three

Overview

Few works of contemporary literature are so universally acclaimed as central to our understanding of the human experience as Nobel Prize winner Samuel Beckett's famous trilogy. Molloy, the first of these masterpieces, appeared in French in 1951. It was followed seven months later by Malone Dies and two years later by The Unnamable. All three have been rendered into English by the author.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900802150911
Publisher:
Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1994
Series:
Beckett, Samuel
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
414

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Three Novels: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Beckett is a unique voice , and in these novels he shows an area of experience which so far as I know is not before so extensively ' covered' in literature. Old age, sickness, deterioration, dying the bleak landscape of the human body and being falling apart. Mailer said of Becket critically ' that we are not all impotent' but apparently in the greying world we live in there is more and more of the truth Beckett has so painfully and beautifully written here.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have just finished the first novel in the trilogy and found it exciting, different. There are no paragraphs, just one long one, little punctuation and the main character Molloy does all the talking except when he quotes in remembrance or otherwise other characters. It answers the question; how little can you put in and still have an enjoyable story? no frills, the primitive story, novel, reflecting the alienation of capitalism and the degeneration of ourselves that are our goals, = $.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The tragi-comist at his best. Beckett renders the meaninglessness of the human experience in beautiful ways. Words fail us. Not so for Beckett. Amidst the bleakness presented here, hope. If Beckett's style is overly skeletal,as is often cliamed, it is because our experience as men is--we choose the flesh. And so with the Trilogy, or arguably with all of Beckett's corpus of work. Nevertheless, Beckett's admonition in Molly: 'you would do better, at least no worse, to obliterate texts than to blacken margins, to fill in the holes of words till all is blank and flat and the whole ghastly business looks like what it is, senseless, speechless, issueless misery.' Highly existentialist, Highly recommended.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago