Engineering in History / Edition 1

Engineering in History / Edition 1

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by Richard Shelton Kirby
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0486264122

ISBN-13: 2900486264126

Pub. Date: 08/01/1990

Publisher: Dover Publications

Broad, nontechnical survey offers fascinating coverage of history's major technological advances: food-producing revolution, appearance of urban society, birth of Greek science, revolution in power, steam and the industrial revolution, electricity and the beginnings of applied science, and the age of automatic control. 181 illustrations. Bibliography. Index.

Overview

Broad, nontechnical survey offers fascinating coverage of history's major technological advances: food-producing revolution, appearance of urban society, birth of Greek science, revolution in power, steam and the industrial revolution, electricity and the beginnings of applied science, and the age of automatic control. 181 illustrations. Bibliography. Index.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2900486264126
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
08/01/1990
Series:
Dover Civil and Mechanical Engineering Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
544

Table of Contents

PREFACE
CHAPTER ONE
  Origins
CHAPTER TWO
  Urban Society
CHAPTER THREE
  Greek Engineering
CHAPTER FOUR
  Imperial Civilization
CHAPTER FIVE
  The Revolution in Power
CHAPTER SIX
  Foundations for Industry
CHAPTER SEVEN
  The Industrial Revolution
CHAPTER EIGHT
  "Roads, Canals, Bridges"
CHAPTER NINE
  Steam Vessels and Locomotives
CHAPTER TEN
  Iron and Steel
CHAPTER ELEVEN
  Electrical Engineering
CHAPTER TWELVE
  Modern Transportation
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
  Sanitary and Hydraulic Engineering
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
  Construction
CHAPTER FIFTEEEN
  Reflections
INDEX

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Engineering in History 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Flexpicker More than 1 year ago
There are two engineers listed as authors, and yet there contribution must have been minimal. For example, while the use of the arch was a major achievement, the authors state merely that it allowed the builders to span greater distances. There is no mention of the limitations of beams (stress=Mc/I), or lines of thrust nor any engineering. When discussing automatic control, there is no mention of Bode, Nichols, Bellman, or other great contributors to the concept. The discussion ends at the flyball governor, which is where most texts start! Also, facts are listed without any connection other than they are discussing the same technology. For instance, in one paragraph the authors mention the water system in Augsberg, Germany as being fantastic (that is all), but then, in the same paragraph, the authors start discussing a pipeline by Le Roy in France. The thoughts are disconnected and make for difficult, if not tedious, reading. While the reproductions of illustrations are very nice, and the authors did condense a large and varied body of material, the overall feel of the book is that the authors combined a multitude of facts into sections of the different technologies without trying to expound any idea or thesis, or even try to explain why the innovations were important.