Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives

Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives

4.0 14
by Robert Draper
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 1451642083

ISBN-13: 2901451642086

Pub. Date: 04/24/2012

Publisher: Free Press

The U.S. House of Representatives—a large, often unruly body of men and women elected every other year from 435 distinct microcosms of America—has achieved renown as “the people’s House,” the world’s most democratic institution, and an acute Rorschach of biennial public passions. In the midterm election year 2010,

Overview

The U.S. House of Representatives—a large, often unruly body of men and women elected every other year from 435 distinct microcosms of America—has achieved renown as “the people’s House,” the world’s most democratic institution, and an acute Rorschach of biennial public passions. In the midterm election year 2010, recession-battered Americans expressed their discontent with a simultaneously overreaching and underperforming government by turning the formerly Democratically controlled House over to the Republicans. Among the new GOP majority were eighty-seven freshmen, many of them political novices with Tea Party backing who pledged a more open, responsive, and fiscally thrifty House. What the 112th Congress instead achieved was a public standing so low—a ghastly 9 percent approval rating— that, as its longest-serving member, John Dingell, would dryly remark, “I think pedophiles would do better.” What happened?

Robert Draper explores this question just as he examined the Bush White House in his 2007 New York Times bestselling book Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush—by burrowing deeply inside the subject, gaining cooperation of the major players, and producing a colorful, unsparingly detailed, but evenhanded narrative of how the House of Representatives became a house of ill repute. Draper’s cast of characters spans the full spectrum of political experience and ideologies—from the Democrat Dingell, a congressman since 1955 (though elbowed out of power by the party’s House leader, Nancy Pelosi), to Allen West, a black Republican Tea Party sensation, former Army lieutenant colonel, and political neophyte with a talent for equal opportunity offending. While unspooling the boisterous, at times tragic, and ultimately infuriating story of the 112th Congress, Draper provides unforgettable portraits of Gabrielle Giffords, the earnest young Arizona congresswoman who was gunned down by a madman at the beginning of the legislative session; Anthony Weiner, the Democrats’ clown prince and self-made media star until the New Yorker self-immolated in a sex scandal; the strong-willed Pelosi and her beleaguered if phlegmatic Republican counterpart, House Speaker John Boehner; the affable majority whip, Kevin McCarthy, tasked with instilling team spirit in the iconoclastic freshmen; and most of all, the previously unknown new members who succeeded in shoving Boehner’s Republican Conference to the far right and thereby bringing the nation, more than once, to the brink of governmental shutdown or economic default.

In this lively work of political narrative, Draper synthesizes some of the most talked-about breaking news of the day with the real story of what happened behind the scenes. This book is a timely and masterfully told parable of dysfunction that may well serve as Exhibit A of how Americans lost faith in their democratic institutions.

***

“Congress will rise June 1st, as most of us expect. Rejoice when that event is ascertained. If we should finish and leave the world right side up, it will be happy. Do not ask what good we do: that is not a fair question, in these days of faction.” —Congressman Fisher Ames, May 30, 1796

In Do Not Ask What Good We Do, Robert Draper captures the prophetic sentiment uttered by Fisher Ames over two centuries ago. As he did in writing about President George W. Bush in Dead Certain, Draper provides an insider’s book like no one else can—this time, inside the U.S. House of Representatives. Because of the bitterly divided political atmosphere we live in, because of the combative nature of this Congress, this literary window on the backstage machinations of the House is both captivating and timely—revealing the House in full, from the process of how laws are made (and in this case, not made) to the most eye-popping cast of lawmakers Washington has ever seen.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2901451642086
Publisher:
Free Press
Publication date:
04/24/2012
Pages:
352

Table of Contents

Cast of Characters xiii

Prologue: Evening, January 20, 2009 xv

Part 1 Reinforcements

1 Tea Party Freshman 3

2 The Dean 11

3 Bayonets 16

Part 2 Shut'er Down

4 Citizens in the Devil's City 27

5 Gabby 35

6 The Institutionalist 40

7 State of the Weiner 51

8 Madam Minority Leader 58

9 Continuing Resolution 69

10 Moment of Silence 98

11 Black Republican Out of Florida 105

12 Radicalization 112

13 Woman of a Certain Rage 117

14 "You Hard Head" 126

Part 3 "You Don't Know Where I'm Coming From!"

15 Draft Horse 155

16 The Winning Message 164

17 Side Pockets on a Cow 171

18 "Here is Your Shield" 186

19 "Dropping Out of Things is What I Do" 193

20 "You Are Wronf 203

Part 4 Rascality

21 Coffee with Your Congressman 215

22 The Hostage 222

23 Lower, Ever Lower 266

Epilogue: Evening, January 24, 2012 283

Notes 289

Acknowledgments 303

Index 307

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Do Not Ask What Good We Do: Inside the U.S. House of Representatives 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
ARTIFEXICIS More than 1 year ago
This book confirms my worst fears about the decay of our government through Congress. Listened to a detailed review and interview about Do Not Ask What Good We Do. As a proud non-partisan Independent, I fear greatly for our nation. Moreover, Robert Draper's book underscores how the Republican Party, which started out as the best asset for our young and divided republic, is now secretly trying to diminish it for short-term election year gains. I hope many will read Do Not Ask What Good We Do before election day.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great description of the dysfunctional House of Representatives and the ignorance of the Freshman class. Particularly revealing are the insights which expose the motivations of the Freshmen who put their ideology ahead of the country.
The_Book_Wheel_Blog More than 1 year ago
I first heard about this book after an interview with the author on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. I was intrigued by Stewart’s comment about politicians being “real people” and decided that I should read the book. I must admit, it was really good. Given, it was good in a, “now I am frightened about the state of our country” way, but it was still good. The book mostly follows the Republican/Tea Party freshman that were voted into office during the 2010 midterm elections. I enjoyed it because it offered some insight about a select few individuals that helped me to understand why they do and vote the way that they do. Granted, what they do isn’t effective nor efficient (as illustrated by the book), but it offers insight nonetheless. The book has a liberal slant at times, but for the most part it stays pretty middle of the road and keeps the reader interested. This book had the potential to be very dry, but the author has a way of telling the stories that keeps the reader engaged from start to finish.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago