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When Sherman Marched North from the Sea: Resistance on the Confederate Home Front / Edition 1
     

When Sherman Marched North from the Sea: Resistance on the Confederate Home Front / Edition 1

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by Jacqueline Glass Campbell
 

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ISBN-10: 0807856592

ISBN-13: 9780807856598

Pub. Date: 08/29/2005

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

Home front and battle front merged in 1865 when General William T. Sherman occupied Savannah and then marched his armies north through the Carolinas. Although much has been written about the military aspects of Sherman's March, Jacqueline Campbell reveals a more complex story. Integrating evidence from Northern soldiers and from Southern civilians, black and white,

Overview

Home front and battle front merged in 1865 when General William T. Sherman occupied Savannah and then marched his armies north through the Carolinas. Although much has been written about the military aspects of Sherman's March, Jacqueline Campbell reveals a more complex story. Integrating evidence from Northern soldiers and from Southern civilians, black and white, male and female, Campbell demonstrates the importance of culture for determining the limits of war and how it is fought.

Sherman's March was an invasion of both geographical and psychological space. The Union army viewed the Southern landscape as military terrain. But when they brought war into Southern households, Northern soldiers were frequently astounded by the fierceness with which many white Southern women defended their homes. Campbell argues that in the household-centered South, Confederate women saw both ideological and material reasons to resist. While some Northern soldiers lauded this bravery, others regarded such behavior as inappropriate and unwomanly.

Campbell also investigates the complexities behind African Americans' decisions either to stay on the plantation or to flee with Union troops. Black Southerners' delight at the coming of the army of "emancipation" often turned to terror as Yankees plundered their homes and assaulted black women.

Ultimately, When Sherman Marched North from the Sea calls into question postwar rhetoric that represented the heroic defense of the South as a male prerogative and praised Confederate women for their "feminine" qualities of sentimentality, patience, and endurance. Campbell suggests that political considerations underlie this interpretation—that Yankee depredations seemed more outrageous when portrayed as an attack on defenseless women and children. Campbell convincingly restores these women to their role as vital players in the fight for a Confederate nation, as models of self-assertion rather than passive self-sacrifice.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807856598
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
08/29/2005
Series:
Civil War America Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.46(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1 Savannah Has Gone Up the Spout
Chapter 2 Rocking the Cradle of Secession
When the Wind Blows
When the Bough Breaks
Chapter 3 The Most Diabolical Act of All the Barbarous War
Chapter 4 God Save Us from the Retreating Friend and Advancing Foe
Chapter 5 With Grief, but Not with Shame
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Index

A map showing the route of Sherman's March appears on page 2.

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When Sherman Marched North from the Sea: Resistance on the Confederate Home Front 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Mer<_>maids that are there to help guide ships during ro<_>ugh waters filled with dan<_>ge<_>rous rocks.