Revolt of the Crash-Test Dummies: Poems

Revolt of the Crash-Test Dummies: Poems

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by Jim Daniels
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1597660248

ISBN-13: 9781597660242

Pub. Date: 01/28/2007

Publisher: Eastern Washington University

A collection of poems by Jim Daniels.

Overview

A collection of poems by Jim Daniels.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781597660242
Publisher:
Eastern Washington University
Publication date:
01/28/2007
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
88
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.40(d)

Table of Contents

You bring out the boring white guy in me
Vitamins
Poetry
Revolt of the Crash-Test Dummies
Firing the Late Person
The Land of 3000 Dreams
Capital Punishment: Lethal Injection
Hung Out to Dry
?
The ability of the corpse
These days they're wearing their halos right

Sizing the Ring

Cement Mixer
Cry Room, St. Mark's Church
Summer Strike at the Axle Plant
Ringing Doorbells
Rocking at the DQ
Charles Holmes blew up the chem lab
Outdoor Chef
Efficiency, Bowling Green, OH
Explicit
Bridal Dance, Redux
Take Your Pills
American Dream
Wonder

Todi Landscape
Mystery Seeds
Esperanza
Dim
White Crayon
Waiting Room, Children's Hospital, Pittsburgh
Illuminating the Saints
Imperfectly
Nocturne in Blue
Sledding in America
They
Big Bang
Mending Fences
Engraving
Flags

Acknowledgments
About the Author

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Revolt of the Crash-Test Dummies: Poems 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
ShawnSorensen43 More than 1 year ago
Ahh, the vulnerability. If you've ever been a novelist or poet with writers block (or a reader with readers block), Daniels can be that author that shows you what ironic, humorous, sad and wonderful things can come out of the smallest of memories, the most quotidian of moments. For my psyche, "Revolt of the Crash Test Dummies" is an 80-page reminder that I don't need to be a struggling artist to have lots to write about and that it's possible to connect and commune with the pain and struggles of others through the windows in my house. Some of the well-known poems from start of the book - "You Bring Out the Boring White Guy In Me," "Firing the Late Person," "Capital Punishment: Lethal Injection" and "Poetry," have certainly made the rounds in swirling Portland literary event and open mic circles. I levitated toward the growing up, I'm-in-my-20s pieces in the middle of the book. One of my favorites was this one: "Efficiency, Bowling Green, OH" I lived in an ancient motel turned into efficiencies barely big enough for the double bed. Two electric burners and a sink. Four friends from Michigan came to visit. So happy to see them, I poured beer over their heads, up their sleeves. They in turn did not hurt me. I'd started smoking again. I blamed the whole state of Ohio. In that small town you could walk everywhere and nowhere and in between. Three bars-two with the word "Dead" in their names. The wind smacked us upside our drunken little heads. One friend, a woman, shared the bed with Marc. The rest of us lay on indoor-outdoor carpet in a U-shape around them. We listened to each other breath in that stinky room.... ....I slept at the foot of the bed and was almost never happier. Four friends. If I was a dog, I'd have licked their feet. The U can be a beautiful letter, softly catching falling things... My friends convinced me to use my porch light for its radiant yellow, its optimistic glow. In case somebody might come home, even if it was only me. The pendulum swings so quickly between happy and sad moments, it adds depth to both extremes. A lot of dark stories try to redeem them selves with somewhat of a happy ending. Some of these poems do the opposite, connecting you to what's more actual in everyday life. Daniels can be humble and edgy at the same time and never writes poetry that can lose its authenticity through poetic niceties or grandiose metaphor. There's a ton of skill here. Just nothing that closes the door to what's real and right in front.