The Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media / Edition 1

The Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media / Edition 1

4.0 1
by Carolyn Kitch
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0807849782

ISBN-13: 9780807849781

Pub. Date: 10/29/2001

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media

Overview

Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807849781
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
10/29/2001
Edition description:
1
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.67(d)

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The Girl on the Magazine Cover: The Origins of Visual Stereotypes in American Mass Media 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
America is more than familiar with the stereotypical blonde bombshells that grace the covers of magazines, television programs, movies, and advertisements. In Carolyn Kitch's book she is able to outline the origins of how stereotypical images came about. Her extensive background in the media along with the use of actual magazine illustrations allows her to present her arguments in a way that anyone with an interest in women's history in the media can understand. Kitch's book maintains the reader's interest by citing specific examples, providing information about the time period, and providing illustrations. Keeping a loosely chronological form allows the book to flow, but the ideas of the time period are more important to Kitch than keeping a pattern. She breaks at appropriate points to discuss alternate visions that challenged and reinforced stereotypes in the media. While Kitch's book is effective, it is not extensive. Its sheer size just doesn't allow Kitch to get as in depth as she could. She promises so much in the introduction, but isn't able to deliver all that she promises. The books briefness keeps it from being extensive, but it is still able to provide me with a more organized knowledge of how stereotypes of women in the media such as the ever-popular blonde bombshell came about.