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Poet's Guide to Poetry
     

Poet's Guide to Poetry

4.3 3
by Mary Kinzie
 

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ISBN-10: 0226437396

ISBN-13: 9780226437392

Pub. Date: 04/28/1999

Publisher: University of Chicago Press


A Poet's Guide to Poetry brings Mary Kinzie's expertise as poet, critic, and director of the creative writing program at Northwestern University to bear in a comprehensive reference work for any writer wishing to better understand poetry. Detailing the formal concepts of poetry and methods of poetic analysis, she shows how the craft of writing can guide the

Overview


A Poet's Guide to Poetry brings Mary Kinzie's expertise as poet, critic, and director of the creative writing program at Northwestern University to bear in a comprehensive reference work for any writer wishing to better understand poetry. Detailing the formal concepts of poetry and methods of poetic analysis, she shows how the craft of writing can guide the art of reading poems. Using examples from the major traditions of lyric and meditative poetry in English from the medieval period to the present, Kinzie considers the sounds and rhythms of poetry along with the ideas and thought-units within poems. Kinzie shares her own successful classroom tactics—encouraging readers to approach a poem as if it were provisional.

The three parts of A Poet's Guide to Poetry lead the reader through a carefully planned introduction to the ways we understand poetry. The first section provides careful, step-by-step instruction to familiarize students with the formal elements of poems, from the most obvious feature through the most devious.

Part I presents the style, grammar, and rhetoric of poems with a wealth of examples from various literary periods.

Part II discusses the way the elements of a poem are controlled in time through a careful explanation and exploration of meter and rhythm. The "four freedoms" of free verse are also examined.

Part III closes the book with helpful practicum chapters on writing in form. Included here are writing exercises for beginning as well as advanced writers, a dictionary of poetic terms replete with poetry examples, and an annotated bibliography for further explanatory reading.

This useful handbook is an ideal reference for literature and writing students as well as practicing poets.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226437392
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
04/28/1999
Series:
Chicago Guides to Writing, Editing, and Publishing Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
572
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.30(d)

Table of Contents


Introduction: The Enchantment of the Work
Writing the Poem You Read: A View of the Artistic Process
Part I: The Elements of Relation and Resemblance
Line and Half-Meaning
Syntax and Whole Meaning
Diction and Layers in Meaning
Trope and Thought
Rhetoric and Speech
Rhythm as Combination

Part II: The Elements, Controlled in Time
Accentual-Syllabic Meter: The Role of Stress and Interval
Stanza and Rhyme: The Role of Echo
Further Rhythms in English—Counted Forms: Accentual Verse and Syllabic Verse (including Haiku)
Further Rhythms in English—Non-Counted Forms:
The Four Freedoms of Free Verse

Part III: Writing in Form
Exercises for Beginning and Advanced Writers
Poetic Terms
Annotated Bibliography of Further Reading

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Poet's Guide to Poetry 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As one who comes to poetry from an academic background in science and technology, I found this book well worth annotation and study. I would classify it as intermediate, with lots of concrete references and well-honed observations, lending itself to informal workshop as well as individual study. In fact I'm starting to reread it with a small group of local published poets. For beginners I recommend Mary Oliver's Rules for the Dance.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Well-written discussion of poetry and its elements: line, syntax, and so forth. However, its notions of prosody, specifically meter, are flawed. I will do best by recommending another text which supplements Ms. Kinzie's in this regard: Timothy Steele's _All the Fun's in How You Say a Thing_. Together, these two texts make an excellent introduction to poetry.