Sickness and Wealth: The Corporate Assault on Global Health

Sickness and Wealth: The Corporate Assault on Global Health

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by Meredith Fort, Mary Ann Mercer, Oscar Gish, Steve Gloyd
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0896087166

ISBN-13: 9780896087163

Pub. Date: 06/01/2004

Publisher: South End Press

In this powerful and accessible collection of new essays, international scholars and activists examine how official and corporate actors of globalization-including multinationals, the IMF and World Bank, the World Trade Organization, and "first world" governments-have enacted policies that limit medical access and promote disease and death for many in the poor

Overview

In this powerful and accessible collection of new essays, international scholars and activists examine how official and corporate actors of globalization-including multinationals, the IMF and World Bank, the World Trade Organization, and "first world" governments-have enacted policies that limit medical access and promote disease and death for many in the poor world. The contributors to Sickness and Wealth provide a history of health and "development" strategies; reveal the grim health consequences of these policies throughout the world; and highlight the work of activists and organizations currently working for improved global health.

Edited by affiliates of Health Alliance International, which is based at the University of Washington in Seattle, Sickness and Wealth features lucid explanations on this pressing topic, as well as instructive graphics and strong photography.

Sickness and Wealth provides a history and context for health and development strategies; shows how profit-driven "development" policies are being exported to countries throughout the world; and reveals the actual health consequences of profit-driven policies, and highlights the work of several social movements currently confronting globalization and working toward improved health.

Authors include Vandana Shiva, revealing the effects of industrial agriculture on poor people’s health; Patrick Bond, exposing the political roots of South Africa’s cholera epidemic; Evelyne Hong, exploring the role of international agencies and corporations in health care; Seiji Yamada, documenting how militarism and war produce disease; and several writers describing how the struggle for people’s health is, itself, becoming globalized.

Contributors include: Stephen Bezruchka, Joseph Brenner, Patrick Bond, Alejandro Ceron, Abhijit Das, Paul Davis, Meredith Fort, Oscar Gish, Steve Gloyd, Tim Holtz, Evelyne Hong, Celia Iriart, Patrick Kachur, Mary Anne Mercer, Emerson Merhy, Ellen Shaffer, Vandana Shiva, Juan Carlos Verdugo, Howard Waitzkin, Seiji Yamada.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780896087163
Publisher:
South End Press
Publication date:
06/01/2004
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxi
Preface: Diagnosing Global Injusticexiii
Introduction: Globalization and Health1
Section 1Brief History of Health and Development Strategies9
Chapter 1The Lethal Divide: How Economic Inequality Affects Health11
Chapter 2The Legacy of Colonial Medicine19
Chapter 3The Primary Health Care Movement Meets the Free Market27
Chapter 4Sapping the Poor: The Impact of Structural Adjustment Programs43
Section 2Expansion of the Neoliberal Model55
Chapter 5The Failures of Neoliberalism: Health Sector Reform in Guatemala57
Chapter 6HMO's Abroad: Managed Care in Latin America69
Chapter 7Trade and Health Care: Corporatizing Vital Human Services79
Chapter 8Militarism and the Social Production of Disease95
Section 3How Economic Globalization Policies Affect Health105
Chapter 9Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply107
Chapter 10The Political Roots of South Africa's Cholera Epidemic119
Chapter 11The Reglobalization of Malaria131
Chapter 12The Battle Against Global AIDS145
Section 4Mobilizing for Health159
Chapter 13The Struggle for People's Health161
Conclusion: Shall We Leave It to the Experts?167
Glossary: Terms and Organizations173
Resource Guide177
Contributors193
Endnotes199
Index223
About South End Press238

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Sickness and Wealth: The Corporate Assault on Global Health 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Even the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) now admit that divisions within and between nations are growing. Recent US studies show that greater inequality is linked to increased mortality rates, violent crime, poor educational outcomes, teenage pregnancies and obesity. The facts are familiar. But what to do? The editors of this collection of essays claim that we need ¿the establishment of people-centred solidarity networks across the world ¿ a global movement for health and social justice. ¿ By globalizing the struggle, we can all create a different world ¿¿ This is Trotsky¿s `permanent revolution¿, that you can¿t have a revolution unless everyone has one ¿ which equals, you can¿t have a revolution. Workers need to oppose these promoters of globalisation just as much as we need to oppose its more obvious agents like the IMF, the World Trade Organization and the European Union. The authors deplore `the extraction of human capital from Africa during the slave trade¿, but accept today¿s similar extraction of skilled labour. The Blair government, in true colonial fashion, strips developing countries of their skilled people, their most precious asset, robbing Zimbabwe for example of more than half its trained nurses. Countries should follow Cuba¿s example, where those trained in Cuba have to work either there or in a less developed country, and they take from no country which is short of doctors and nurses. Of the 21 contributors to this collection, 15 are American academics ¿ not one of whom identifies herself as a member of a trade union. These latter-day missionaries and do-gooders are telling the health workers of all nations not to make revolution in their own country but to become `global health activists¿. Health workers don¿t need `the establishment of people-centred solidarity networks across the world¿ or `a global movement for health and social justice¿. We need strong trade unions rooted in their working classes. Workers need to defend and develop national heath services, defend public planned health care, defend jobs and industries, and strengthen our trade unions. The Cuban people have vastly improved their health, not by `globalizing the struggle¿, but by making revolution in their own country.