The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre & Every Business a Stage

The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre & Every Business a Stage

4.7 3
by James H. Gilmore, B. Joseph Pine II
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0875848192

ISBN-13: 9780875848198

Pub. Date: 05/01/1999

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press


Future economic growth lies in the value of experiences and transformations--good and services are no longer enough. We are on the threshold, say authors Pine and Gilmore, of the Experience Economy, a new economic era in which all businesses must orchestrate memorable events for their customers. The Experience Economy offers a creative, highly original, and yet

Overview


Future economic growth lies in the value of experiences and transformations--good and services are no longer enough. We are on the threshold, say authors Pine and Gilmore, of the Experience Economy, a new economic era in which all businesses must orchestrate memorable events for their customers. The Experience Economy offers a creative, highly original, and yet eminently practical strategy for companies to script and stage the experiences that will transform the value of what they produce. From America Online to Walt Disney, the authors draw from a rich and varied mix of examples that showcase businesses in the midst of creating personal experiences for both consumers and businesses. The authors urge managers to look beyond traditional pricing factors like time and cost, and consider charging for the value of the transformation that an experience offers. Goods and services, say Pine and Gilmore, are no longer enough. Experiences and transformations are the basis for future economic growth, and The Experience Economy is the script from which managers can begin to direct their own transformations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780875848198
Publisher:
Harvard Business Review Press
Publication date:
05/01/1999
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.38(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

PREVIEW Step Right Upix
1 Welcome to the Experience Economy1
2 Setting the Stage27
3 The Show Must Go On45
4 Get Your Act Together69
5 Experiencing Less Sacrifice81
INTERMISSION A Refreshing Experience95
6 Work Is Theatre101
7 Performing to Form119
8 Now Act Your Part139
9 The Customer Is the Product163
10 Finding Your Role in the World185
ENCORE Exit, Stage Right205
Notes207
Index231
Credits249
About the Authors253

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The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre & Every Business a Stage 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
savvyshows More than 1 year ago
Many have noticed that America is importing more and more goods from places where it is more economical to manufacture them than here in the U.S., .Mexico and China come immediately to mind.and have commented that America's economy has turned into a service-based economy. Yet, even our services are now being sent to foreign countries so that corporations can save money; think "technical support" for computer applications, for example. In their book, The Experience Economy: Work is Theatre & Every Business a Stage, Joseph Pine and Jim Gilmore (1999) introduce their readers to a new era of consumer-focused marketing.an era that goes beyond the delivery of goods and services, and into delivering consumer experiences. The authors present clear evidence and case studies that business owners who compete on the basis of price are commoditizing their value offerings; and that those who deliver compelling, memorable, and transformational experiences to their customers are pioneering and leading this economy revolution known as The Experience Economy. The Experience Economy provides insights into how successful businesses have moved into the new age of experience marketing, and Pine and Gilmore present a logical blueprint for marketers to follow. True experiences, say Gilmore and Pine, provide a value that "lingers in the memory of any individual who was engaged by the event" (1999). In order to create those memories, an experience must deliver on guest participation and connection and even transformation. The Experience Economy has become more than a best-selling book since its publication ten years ago; it has transformed the way not only Americans, but also people the world over, are conducting business. In this book, it is almost as though Pine and Gilmore have discovered the secret recipe, not for Coca Cola or Kentucky Fried Chicken, but for Disney World. They have captured the essence and substance of what creates success for companies marketing directly to consumers, and have spelled it out in a language that is understandable to anyone. In reading the book, the reader finds him or herself constantly nodding his or her head, agreeing with the examples provided and finally "getting it" .how they work they way they do or why they fail to work the way they were originally intended. The book provides insights not only into pop culture, but business on a much higher level.and how success will be measured, not only in the past decade but in future decades to come, by how well the business experience has integrated itself into pop culture of today. Pine and Gilmore take the current success stories: Disney, The Geek Squad, Rainforest Café, Starbucks, Cabella's, and the like, and teach their readers how to create tomorrow's experience culture. Applicable to both historians and marketers alike, it is not so much a book on the history of pop culture, as it is a visionary book on the future of marketing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Authors B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore look at the ways that corporations create engaging experiences for their customers to boost sales. They amass examples that confirm the developing trend toward an 'Experience Economy.' Their premise is that the post-industrial economy has evolved beyond delivering commodities and services, and is now poised to deliver 'experiences.' These experiences can include everything from a meal at a theme restaurant to a Disneyland vacation. The premise is interesting, but before you hit the trend button, realize that this is not the first time marketers have courted customers with powerful retail experiences. However, it may be the first time sellers have used virtual reality and Hollywood-style animated props. This intellectually interesting book dares to be far out and to pursue the concept of engaging customers to its extremes. We recommend this book to business owners or marketers more as a theoretical introduction to the 'Experience Economy' than as a marketing manual. If you feel intrigued and engaged, that¿s the point. For more information, please refer to Disney World.