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Boot: An L.A.P.D. Officer's Rookie Year
     

Boot: An L.A.P.D. Officer's Rookie Year

4.8 5
by William Dunn, William Dunn
 
The Rodney King beating and the OJ Simpson trial brought the L.A.P.D. national notoriety as a corrupt force out of synch with the city it polices. But is this force of 8,600 men and women really made up of mavericks, racists and rogues? In this revised edition of a timeless classic, rookie police officer William Dunn takes you inside that other L.A.P.D., where

Overview

The Rodney King beating and the OJ Simpson trial brought the L.A.P.D. national notoriety as a corrupt force out of synch with the city it polices. But is this force of 8,600 men and women really made up of mavericks, racists and rogues? In this revised edition of a timeless classic, rookie police officer William Dunn takes you inside that other L.A.P.D., where hard-working cops struggle to understand citizens’ concerns and dodge criminal’s bullets.

Set during one of the it’s most violent years in one of it’s most violent South Central neighborhoods, Los Angeles--and the L.A.P.D.--as seen through the eyes of a rookie officer is a potentially volatile, constantly changing landscape. To be a good cop, and survive the experience, Dunn quickly learns from some unforgettable teachers how to lay down the law on the streets. Dunn’s dispatches from the frontlines of L.A. are dramatic. Every day there’s another drive-by shooting, high-speed chase, drug-related execution, or unexplained attack on police officers. He offers some of the most compelling insights into the trials and tribulations of the young officer--and the way that we keep the peace in our most dangerous policing districts.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In the post-Rodney King era, the LAPD is still cleaning up its image, and this account of a cop's first year in the City of Angels could contribute to achieving that goal. Dunn joined the force in 1990 and was assigned to the Southwest division, one of the city's hot spots, with 25 identified gangs, whose membership numbered in the thousands, and double the city's felony-arrest average. In the course of the book, it becomes clear that the average L.A. cop is not a sadist or a racist but a conscientious worker mindful that, even in a high-crime area, the majority of residents are poor people trying to live within the law and avoid being killed by the warfare in their streets. Not that Dunn doesn't encounter oddball and embittered colleagues, but he also finds many who want to protect and serve. Among the cases he deals with are petty crimes committed by teen boys and girls without hopes and dreams, plenty of not-overly-bright burglars and muggers and some very hard types. Dunn ends on a high note with an account of an unusually vicious murderer put away for life. An effective, forceful report. (Nov.)
Library Journal
This is a refreshingly unpretentious first-person account of a rookie cop's experiences on the mean streets of L.A. Dunn tells of his first days: learning the ropes from more experienced officers, feeling the rush of adrenaline when confronting dangerous situations, learning the codes and behaviors of street gangs, confronting the fact of death, and developing the uniquely strong bonds that exist among individuals working under hazardous conditions. What sets this apart from many other cop narratives is Dunn's avoidance of self-aggrandizement and his ability to portray incidents realistically and dramatically. This fast-paced book is recommended for popular collections. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 8/96.]Ben R. Harrison, East Orange P.L., N.J.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688147136
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/01/1996
Pages:
273
Product dimensions:
6.42(w) x 9.55(h) x 0.99(d)

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