Boots on the Ground: The Fight to Liberate Afghanistan from Al-Qaeda and the Taliban, 2001-2002
  • Boots on the Ground: The Fight to Liberate Afghanistan from Al-Qaeda and the Taliban, 2001-2002
  • Boots on the Ground: The Fight to Liberate Afghanistan from Al-Qaeda and the Taliban, 2001-2002

Boots on the Ground: The Fight to Liberate Afghanistan from Al-Qaeda and the Taliban, 2001-2002

by Dick Camp
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Immediately following 9/11, the United States needed to strike back . . . but against whom? In the eyes of the intelligence community, the aerial attack on the World Trade Center and Washington, D.C., bore all the signs of an al-Qaeda operation. This was soon verified by al-Qaeda itself, as Osama bin Laden claimed credit.
 
America quickly targeted

See more details below

Overview

Immediately following 9/11, the United States needed to strike back . . . but against whom? In the eyes of the intelligence community, the aerial attack on the World Trade Center and Washington, D.C., bore all the signs of an al-Qaeda operation. This was soon verified by al-Qaeda itself, as Osama bin Laden claimed credit.
 
America quickly targeted al-Qaeda and the Taliban regime in Afghanistan that was providing them sanctuary. Central Command, responsible for the Middle East, including Afghanistan, outlined three options: strike back with cruise missiles, strike back with cruise missiles and manned bombers, or complement aerial attacks with American ground forces: “boots on the ground.” President George W. Bush wanted direct action, so American ground forces, supported by American airpower and cruise missiles, became the order of the day.
 
Initially, the boots were worn by CIA covert operatives and U.S. Army Special Forces teams, the famed Green Berets. Bush authorized the CIA an additional $1 billion to drive al-Qaeda and the Taliban from power. On 17 September 2001, Bush authorized the CIA to engage al-Qaeda and other terrorist organizations anywhere in the world and assassinate individuals designated as terrorists. It was the broadest and most lethal authority in the agency’s history. The CIA deployed teams across Afghanistan to work with the Northern Alliance and U.S. Army Special Forces.
 
The results were immediate and positive. The Northern Alliance had the Taliban and al-Qaeda on the run with a remarkable combination of “horse soldiers” and high-tech U.S. airpower called in by American special operations forces. Late in November, U.S. Marine Corps Task Force 58 seized an airstrip southwest of the Taliban stronghold of Kandahar in the longest amphibious raid in history, 450 miles from the sea. In early December, Kandahar fell to forces loyal to Hamid Karzai, who would later become president of Afghanistan. It was the last remaining Taliban stronghold in the country. Al-Qaeda and Taliban leadership fled.
 
Acclaimed military historian Dick Camp details this remarkable campaign for Afghanistan. He also provides a comprehensive history of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the Red Army’s unsuccessful occupation of the country, which led to the rise of the Afghani mujahideen and anti-Soviet foreign fighters under al-Qaeda, as well as the subsequent rise of the Taliban.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Camp is a superb military historian and author. His writing style sweeps the reader along with vivid descriptions of unusual battles. One can almost taste the swirling dust as the bullets whiz past the rider. Dick Camp has combined his flowing narrative and supporting photos with the first-person oral testimony of its participants to create this historical masterwork. Ever seeking to go the extra mile, Camp includes a first-rate set of supporting maps. To this illustrious purpose, Camp teamed with artist, now mapmaker, Lieutenant Colonel Richard “Wild Bill” Cody, USMC (Ret) with masterful effect. With much more of the Afghan story left to be told, we can imagine that Dick Camp is toiling away to bring us the next segment of his complex, and often baffling, war.” - Leatherneck

“It’s difficult to write an accurate history of a war as it unfolds, but historian and former combat veteran Marine Dick Camp succeeds brilliantly with his latest book “Boots on the Ground.” While “Boots on the Ground” details the remarkable campaign that initially drove the Taliban and Al-Qaeda from Afghanistan, its real value goes beyond; “Boots on the Ground” is a comprehensive study of recent Afghanistan history, the courage and ingenuity of the American fighting men, and the continued importance of “small wars” styled personal relationships in an otherwise hi-tech world.” – The Gazette

Kirkus Reviews

"A specific, technical study of the U.S. military’s special operations against al-Qaeda in Afghanistan in the weeks after 9/11. Sticking to the record, retired Marine Corps veteran Camp (Battle for the City of the Dead: In the Shadow of the Golden Dome, Najaf, August 2004, 2011, etc.) does not impart judgment to this extraordinary story of the U.S. expulsion of Taliban forces in the space of several weeks after 9/11. Maps, chronology and photos all relay the historian’s sense of meticulous research without heeding stylistic embellishments. Camp paints the grim background by depicting the brutal Soviet invasion of the country in 1979 and the disastrous 10-year occupation, resulting in many dead, billions spent and little gained. Emerging from the squalid refugee camps and supported by Pakistan intelligence, the mujahideen were proud, fearless guerrilla fighters who formed small, mobile units that roamed the countryside laying ambush. They were highly effective over the rugged terrain against the lumbering Soviet juggernaut, and would be again when enlisted by the U.S. against the Taliban. The attacks on 9/11 underscored what the Americans should have seen coming: The Taliban (still supported by Pakistan), militarized by Osama bin Laden, had issued jihad against America, as evidenced by the suicide bomb on the USS Cole in 2000 and other attacks. Camp delves into the Bush Administration’s war machinations led by Donald Rumsfeld, and though the military detail can occasionally become overwhelming, the big events unfurl methodically, climaxing in U.S.-backed Hamid Karzai’s taking of Kandahar, and the pursuit of al-Qaeda troops to the border of Pakistan. Operation Anaconda officially closed in March 2002, before the U.S. turned its attention to Iraq. A workmanlike, nuts-and-bolt account of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan.

Kirkus Reviews
A specific, technical study of the U.S. military's special operations against al-Qaeda in Afghanistan in the weeks after 9/11. Sticking to the record, retired Marine Corps veteran Camp (Battle for the City of the Dead: In the Shadow of the Golden Dome, Najaf, August 2004, 2011, etc.) does not impart judgment to this extraordinary story of the U.S. expulsion of Taliban forces in the space of several weeks after 9/11. Maps, chronology and photos all relay the historian's sense of meticulous research without heeding stylistic embellishments. Camp paints the grim background by depicting the brutal Soviet invasion of the country in 1979 and the disastrous 10-year occupation, resulting in many dead, billions spent and little gained. Emerging from the squalid refugee camps and supported by Pakistan intelligence, the mujahideen were proud, fearless guerrilla fighters who formed small, mobile units that roamed the countryside laying ambush. They were highly effective over the rugged terrain against the lumbering Soviet juggernaut, and would be again when enlisted by the U.S. against the Taliban. The attacks on 9/11 underscored what the Americans should have seen coming: The Taliban (still supported by Pakistan), militarized by Osama bin Laden, had issued jihad against America, as evidenced by the suicide bomb on the USS Cole in 2000 and other attacks. Camp delves into the Bush Administration's war machinations led by Donald Rumsfeld, and though the military detail can occasionally become overwhelming, the big events unfurl methodically, climaxing in U.S.-backed Hamid Karzai's taking of Kandahar, and the pursuit of al-Qaeda troops to the border of Pakistan. Operation Anaconda officially closed in March 2002, before the U.S. turned its attention to Iraq. A workmanlike, nuts-and-bolt account of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760341117
Publisher:
Zenith Press
Publication date:
01/14/2012
Pages:
312
Sales rank:
1,400,839
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.30(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
 

 

 

 

Kirkus Reviews

"A specific, technical study of the U.S. military’s special operations against al-Qaeda in Afghanistan in the weeks after 9/11. Sticking to the record, retired Marine Corps veteran Camp (Battle for the City of the Dead: In the Shadow of the Golden Dome, Najaf, August 2004, 2011, etc.) does not impart judgment to this extraordinary story of the U.S. expulsion of Taliban forces in the space of several weeks after 9/11. Maps, chronology and photos all relay the historian’s sense of meticulous research without heeding stylistic embellishments. Camp paints the grim background by depicting the brutal Soviet invasion of the country in 1979 and the disastrous 10-year occupation, resulting in many dead, billions spent and little gained. Emerging from the squalid refugee camps and supported by Pakistan intelligence, the mujahideen were proud, fearless guerrilla fighters who formed small, mobile units that roamed the countryside laying ambush. They were highly effective over the rugged terrain against the lumbering Soviet juggernaut, and would be again when enlisted by the U.S. against the Taliban. The attacks on 9/11 underscored what the Americans should have seen coming: The Taliban (still supported by Pakistan), militarized by Osama bin Laden, had issued jihad against America, as evidenced by the suicide bomb on the USS Cole in 2000 and other attacks. Camp delves into the Bush Administration’s war machinations led by Donald Rumsfeld, and though the military detail can occasionally become overwhelming, the big events unfurl methodically, climaxing in U.S.-backed Hamid Karzai’s taking of Kandahar, and the pursuit of al-Qaeda troops to the border of Pakistan. Operation Anaconda officially closed in March 2002, before the U.S. turned its attention to Iraq. A workmanlike, nuts-and-bolt account of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan.

 

“Camp is a superb military historian and author. His writing style sweeps the reader along with vivid descriptions of unusual battles. One can almost taste the swirling dust as the bullets whiz past the rider. Dick Camp has combined his flowing narrative and supporting photos with the first-person oral testimony of its participants to create this historical masterwork. Ever seeking to go the extra mile, Camp includes a first-rate set of supporting maps. To this illustrious purpose, Camp teamed with artist, now mapmaker, Lieutenant Colonel Richard “Wild Bill” Cody, USMC (Ret) with masterful effect. With much more of the Afghan story left to be told, we can imagine that Dick Camp is toiling away to bring us the next segment of his complex, and often baffling, war.” - Leatherneck

 “It’s difficult to write an accurate history of a war as it unfolds, but historian and former combat veteran Marine Dick Camp succeeds brilliantly with his latest book “Boots on the Ground.” While “Boots on the Ground” details the remarkable campaign that initially drove the Taliban and Al-Qaeda from Afghanistan, its real value goes beyond; “Boots on the Ground” is a comprehensive study of recent Afghanistan history, the courage and ingenuity of the American fighting men, and the continued importance of “small wars” styled personal relationships in an otherwise hi-tech world.” – The Gazette

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >