Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream by Juan Felipe Herrera, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream

Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream

by Juan Felipe Herrera
     
 
From one of the prominent Chicano poets writing today comes a collection of poems to take your breath away. With dazzling speed and energy, Juan Felipe Herrera sends readers rocketing through verbal space in a celebration of the rhythms and textures of words that will make you want to shout, dance, and read out loud.

Lika a wild ride in a fast car, Border-Crosser

Overview

From one of the prominent Chicano poets writing today comes a collection of poems to take your breath away. With dazzling speed and energy, Juan Felipe Herrera sends readers rocketing through verbal space in a celebration of the rhythms and textures of words that will make you want to shout, dance, and read out loud.

Lika a wild ride in a fast car, Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream moves at breakneck speed, a post-Lorca journey across the new millennium terrain. Words careen through space and time, through blighted urban landscapes, past banjos and bees, past AIDS faces and mad friars, past severed heads and steel-toed border-crosser boots. To the rhythm of "The Blue Eyed Mambo that Unveils My Lover's Belly" and the sounds of the Last Mayan Acid rock band, Herrera races through the hallucinations of a nation that remains just outside of paradise.

With dazzling poems that roar from the darkest corners of our minds toward an ecstatic celebration of the lushness of language, Border-Crosser with a Lamborghini Dream is a celebration of a world that is both sacred and cruel, a world of "Poesy mad/& Chicano style undone wild" by one of the most daring poets of our time.

Poet and performance artist Juan Felipe Herrera is the author of many books of poetry and prose, including Love After the Riots and Mayan Drifter: Chicano Poet in the Lowlands of America, as well as two bilingual books for children. He lives in Fresno, California.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Anyone who thinks high art and performance poetry don't mix should re-read "Howl" and then pick up Herrera's latest, following 1994's Night Train to Tuxtla. Wryly drawing on our expectations of "ethnic" poetry ("my Neo-American uzzi mutations, my upgraded/ 2Pac thresholds"), Herrera performs the rare trick of simultaneously speaking from a self-aware, culturally marginalized perspective, while refusing to limit his poetic horizons--as in the tour-de-force opener "punk half panther": "Meet my barriohood, meet me/ with the froth i pick up everyday & everyday/ i wipe away with ablution & apologia & a smirk, then/ a smile on my Cholo-Millennium liberation jacket." As comfortable surfing the info-glut ("digital in its global suture ticktock of our existence") as in "the Kaliwey prayer house of the forgotten hope-shoe makers," Herrera's political salvos and satires can be surprisingly lyrical, as if not quite able to give up the idea of beauty: "You the King: you the tiger speaks the long grain hump, hear/ it sing to you, with a crooked guitar, wine colored string." This collection puts most academic poetry to shame, and, along with the work of poets like Luis Rodriguez, evidences an opening in the impasse between partisans of street-wise staccato and page-wise pleasure. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Herrera's writing has continually drawn attention to aspects of his people's heritage, whether it be the Barrio or the Maya. In Love After the Riots (LJ 4/1/96), Herrera proved himself capable of deep lyricism despite adverse circumstances, reminiscent perhaps of Neruda's The Captain's Verses (LJ 9/15/72). True to its title, Border-Crosser tackles legal and illegal immigration, America as the diaspora, and conflicting cultures, highlighted in the comic image of the immigrant "digging deep" in a boat filled with bananas, mangoes, plantains, and jalapenos. The poems in this volume are technically diverse, from the performance aspects of Herrera's readings and plays to long lines, incantations, and surrealism borrowed from the 1960s Beat poets. But diversity is not necessarily better. Despite certain reservations, there are enough gems in this collection--"lord jim" and "we are all saying the same thing" to name two--to make it well worth reading. Recommended especially for urban libraries.--Rochelle Ratner, formerly with "Soho Weekly News," New York
From the Publisher
"Herrera's political salvos can be surprisingly lyrical. . . . This collection puts most academic poetry to shame."—Publishers Weekly

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780816519316
Publisher:
University of Arizona Press
Publication date:
03/28/1999
Series:
Camino Del Sol

What People are saying about this

Benjamin Saenz
Using the cacophonous rhythms of urban life, Herrera indulges in a search for spiritual and political centers.... These poems are nothing short of miraculous.

Meet the Author

Poet and performance artist Juan Felipe Herrera is the author of many books of poetry and prose, as well as two bilingual books for children. He is the twenty-first Poet Laureate of the United States.

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