Border Crossings: Christian Trespasses on Popular Culture and Public Affairs

Overview

The usual modern assumption is that Christians are supposed to leave explicitly Christian convictions and practices behind when they engage public affairs and popular culture. In this fascinating book, Rodney Clapp rejects that assumption and trespasses onto secular territory--from global corporations to Winnie-the-Pooh, from family values to The X-Files, from consumerism to Hank Williams and John Coltrane.
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Overview

The usual modern assumption is that Christians are supposed to leave explicitly Christian convictions and practices behind when they engage public affairs and popular culture. In this fascinating book, Rodney Clapp rejects that assumption and trespasses onto secular territory--from global corporations to Winnie-the-Pooh, from family values to The X-Files, from consumerism to Hank Williams and John Coltrane.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Clapp's latest book is another prophetic offering from an anomalous Christian evangelical. The author of Families at the Crossroads and The Consuming Passion, Clapp knows the subculture well, having worked at Christianity Today, InterVarsity Press, and now Baker Books. But he has cast his lot liturgically with the Episcopalians, and he runs with the radicals from ESA (Evangelicals for Social Action). He also enjoys jazz and country music, films and TV, children's literature and epistemology. All these interests and more merge in this collection of essays. What unifies them is Clapp's contention that Christians have "disembodied the faith and dismembered (that is, individualized) the Church." Postmodernist, postfoundationalist and ecclesiocentric, he argues that the language of the church ought to be the most basic language Christians speak, and that their forays into other areas of public culture (across "borders") should be undertaken first and foremost as Christians. With these essays, he not only argues that this is so, but shows how it can be done. Clapp writes with wit and verve--and with a little nerve, too. He's not given to academic "flank-guarding," though he writes for an educated audience. His style is winsome and accessible, generously citing other authors, pointing to good thinking and writing when he sees it. Others will point to this book in the same way. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781587430039
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/1/2000
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Rodney Clapp is the Editorial Director of Brazos Press. His previous books include A Peculiar People: The Church as Culture in a Post-Christian Society and Families at the Crossroads: Beyond Traditional & Modern Options.
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Table of Contents

Nonlinear Reading Guide to this Book

Linear Reading Guide to this Book

Part 1: The Inevitability of Borders
1. How Firm a Foundation: Can Evangelicals Be Nonfoundationalists?
2. Tom T. Hall and the Necessity of Narrative
3. The Truth Is Out There: Why The X-Files Is Really about Epistemology
4. Nothin' But Us Liberals Here: Why Christianity Is Not Free in America

Part 2: Inside Christian Borders
5. The Ivory Tower Comes to the Windy City: In Defense of Theology
6. Tacit Holiness: The Importance of Bodies and Habits in Doing Church
7. The Grammar of Thanksgiving
8. Let the Pagans Have the Holiday
9. Shame Crucifies
10. At the Intersection of Eucharist and Capital: On the Future of Liturgical Worship

Part 3: Trespassing Secular Borders: Politics and Economics
11. Calling the Religious Right to Its Better Self
12. From Family Values to Family Virtues
13. The Theology of Consumption and the Consumption of Theology: Toward a Christian Response to Consumerism
14. The Transnational Corporation: More Church than the Church
15. The Not-So-Naked New Public Square

Part 4: Trespassing Secular Borders: Popular Culture
16. The Sin of Winnie-the-Pooh
17. The Saxophonist Who Would Be a Saint
18. That Glorious Mongrel: How Jazz Can Correct the Heresy of White Christianity
19. From Holiness to Honky-Tonks: Race and Religion in Country Music

Endnotes Acknowledgments

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