BN.com Gift Guide

The Border Lords (Charlie Hood Series #4)

( 25 )

Overview

Three-time Edgar Award-winner T. Jefferson Parker, contemporary crime fiction's most critically acclaimed writer, delivers his dark masterpiece.

Year after year, T. Jefferson Parker delivers powerful novels of depth and intelligence that make it clear that Dutton is not just publishing one of the best crime writers of his generation, but perhaps one of the greatest crime writers ever. The novels in the Charlie Hood cycle are the most accomplished in Parker's long career, and The...

See more details below
Hardcover
$18.97
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$26.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (100) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $1.99   
  • Used (91) from $1.99   
The Border Lords: A Charlie Hood Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Three-time Edgar Award-winner T. Jefferson Parker, contemporary crime fiction's most critically acclaimed writer, delivers his dark masterpiece.

Year after year, T. Jefferson Parker delivers powerful novels of depth and intelligence that make it clear that Dutton is not just publishing one of the best crime writers of his generation, but perhaps one of the greatest crime writers ever. The novels in the Charlie Hood cycle are the most accomplished in Parker's long career, and The Border Lords is the pinnacle of what has become the most groundbreaking crime series in decades.

In this riveting new novel, Parker demonstrates once again why The Washington Post said he writes "the best of today's crime fiction," and why he has won the Edgar Award three times.

ATF agent Sean Ozburn is deep undercover supporting the sicarios of the Baja Cartel when he suddenly goes completely dark, his only communications being the haunting digital videos he sends to his desperately worried wife, Seliah. Charlie Hood must determine if Oz is simply chasing demons deeper undercover than anyone has ever gone, or whether his friend has suffered a permanent break with his mission and his moral compass.

A crime novel of unprecedented scope and unrivaled storytelling ambition by one of our most treasured talents, The Border Lords revisits the fevered landscape of America's southern border- and confronts the unexplored depths of humanity's dark soul.

Watch a Video

Read More Show Less
  • T. Jefferson Parker
    T. Jefferson Parker  

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
At the start of Parker's adrenaline-fueled fourth thriller featuring L.A. sheriff's deputy Charlie Hood (after Iron River), Hood, who's still on loan to the ATF, and his ATF partners are watching a house in the border town of Buenavista, Calif., occupied by four young gunmen of the North Baja Cartel--and Hood's ATF agent friend, Sean Ozburn, who's operating undercover as a meth and gun dealer. When Ozburn goes rogue and fatally shoots the four cartel members, Hood knows he has to bring Ozburn in. Parker skillfully blends Hood's pursuit of the increasingly erratic Ozburn, who approaches a powerful cartel leader about buying the latest gun sensation, the Love 32, with that of L.A. deputy Bradley Jones, a man with connections both to Hood's past and the world of the cartels. The porousness of the U.S.-Mexico border and the ease with which guns, drugs, and killers pass back and forth is nowhere better illustrated than in Parker's white-hot series. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Father Joe is up to no good with his precious vampire bats, but Sean Ozburn doesn't know that when he befriends him. Sean is a reliable agent with the ATF (Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives), and his colleague Charlie Hood trusts him totally. But working undercover takes its toll, and now Sean's gone rogue, attacking the Mexican drug cartel on his own terms. Is Sean suffering from delusions of grandeur, or is his personality change caused by something more sinister? Meanwhile, young L.A. deputy Bradley Jones exerts his power, balancing his day job while conspiring with another branch of the cartel. Bradley's arrogance (he's a descendant of the infamous bandit Joaquin Murrieta) is breathtaking, and his devious plans complicate Charlie's operations. With no time to waste, Charlie is soon scrambling from remote airstrips to resorts in a desperate attempt to save lives. The devil is very much present in this troubled landscape, and he's the ultimate shape-shifter, as Parker has so adeptly proven with his Charlie Hood titles. VERDICT Parker's dark and gritty series takes readers beyond the drug war headlines, personalizing the toll it's taken on our souls. Series fans will devour this sequel to Iron River. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 8/10.]—Teresa L. Jacobsen, Solano Cty. Lib., Fairfield, CA
Kirkus Reviews

In the fourth of his ambitious Border series (Iron River, 2010, etc.), Parker pits veteran agentCharlie Hood against errant good guys, vicious bad guys and maybe something in the paranormal guise.

Blowdown, the ATF operation aimed at coping with nonstop wickedness sourced south of the border, is not exactly overmatched, but Charlie is unsettled. He senses a day of reckoning. Entrepreneurial no-goods like the remorseless Carlos Herredia make formidable enemies. In defense of a flourishing drug trade, his well-armed, well-trained minions will murder at the drop of a sombrero, and it worries Charlie that close friend and colleague Sean Ozburn has been undercover among them longer than is feasible. And then suddenly there is tangible evidence suggesting Sean might have gone over, evidence persuasive enough to shake even Seliah, Sean's loving and endlessly loyal wife. The fact is Sean's behavior has undergone a sea change. He says and does things that to Charlie—to Seliah as well—seem wildly out of character, so much so that theidea of demonic possession occurs at least fleetingly to all three. "Maybe we're really not normal people," a panicky Sean says to his wife. Meanwhile internecine warfare between cutthroat gangs has intensified, catching Sean in the middle. The southern border becomes a killing field as barbarian chieftains struggle for ascendancy, while to Parker the war itself becomes a metaphor for a civil society struggling to survive. An excess of subplots softens the middle a bit, but this is a rich book, packed with action, violence, love, lust, flashes of wit, moments of poignancy and the occasional sharp geopolitical insight.

Despite 17 novels ranging from first-rate to extraordinary, Parker has somehow managed not to become a household name, which means enough of you aren't trying.

Marilyn Stasio
Parker is a connoisseur of the macabre, and even at their most absurd, his fantasies are always madly entertaining.
—The New York Times
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780525952008
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/11/2011
  • Series: Charlie Hood Series , #4
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 1,401,409
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

T. Jefferson Parker
T. Jefferson Parker is the bestselling author of fourteen previous novels, including Storm Runners and The Fallen. Alongside Dick Francis and James Lee Burke, Parker is one of only three writers to be awarded the Edgar Award for Best Novel more than once. Parker lives with his family in Southern California.

Biography

One of the best loved crime writers of our time, T. Jefferson Parker was born in Los Angeles and has lived all of his life in Southern California. The poster boy for Orange County, he enjoyed an almost idyllic childhood bodysurfing, playing in Little League, and enjoying family outings with his parents and siblings. He was educated in public schools in Orange County and received his bachelor's degree in English from the University of California, Irvine, in 1976. (He was honored in 1992 as the University's Distinguished Alumnus.)

His writing career began in 1978 as a cub reporter on the weekly newspaper, The Newport Ensign. After covering crime, city hall, and local culture for the Ensign, Parker moved on to the Daily Pilot newspaper, where he won three Orange County Press Club awards for his articles. During this time, he filed away information he would later use to develop characters and plot points for his novels.

Published in 1985, Parker's first book, Laguna Heat, was written in whatever spare time he could find during his stint as a reporter. The book received rave reviews and was made into an HBO movie starring Harry Hamlin, Jason Robards and Rip Torn.

Since that auspicious beginning, Parker has made a name for himself with smart, savvy bestsellers dealing with crime, life, and death in sunny Southern California. In 2001, he hit the jackpot with Silent Joe, a bittersweet thriller that won the Mystery Writers of America's coveted Edgar Award for Best Novel. In 2004, he repeated the feat with Califoria Girl, making him one of only two writers (the other is James Lee Burke) ever to have won two Best Novel Edgars. Among other honors and accolades, Parker has won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Best Mystery/Thriller and the Southern California Booksellers Award for Best Novel of the Year. His books continue to score big on the national bestseller lists.

Good To Know

The "T" in Parker's name doesn't really stand for anything. His mother once told him she thought it would look good on the presidential letterhead!

In an interview with hardluckstories.com, Parker explained how his definition of noir has altered: "It seems to me that since 9/11 our appetites for darkness have shrunk a little. Mine have. I know that as a writer I've tried to bring more breadth and humanity to my stories. I think when all is said and done, a noir attitude is fine, but it's still just an attitude, a pose.

Parker's first wife, Catherine, died of a brain tumor at a very young age. He has since remarried happily.

In an interview with Harlan Coben, Parker was asked about the state of crime writing, i.e., what's wrong and what's right with it. "I think the Achilles heel of mystery/crime writing is character," he responded. "You have to have good characters—and sometimes I think mystery writers rely to heavily on plot and velocity of plot at the expense of characters."

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Fallbrook, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 26, 1953
    2. Place of Birth:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, University of California-Irvine, 1976
    2. Website:

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 25 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(6)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 27, 2010

    vampires on the border

    Eighteen months is much longer than the average law
    enforcement offi cer stays undercover, but Sean Gravas
    was so close that to pull him now would see months of
    operational expenses go down the drain. Hood made
    the decision to leave him in. He was working with gang members,
    the North Baja Cartel, across the Mexican border to break a gunrunners
    ring suspected of smuggling in a thousand machine pistols.
    When all the gang members in the home are brutally slain, Gravas
    appears to be implicated, so Hood solicits the help of Gravas' wife
    Seliah to bring him out of his undercover role as Ozburn even if it
    means he has to face charges. Seliah notices changes in her husband's
    behavior, which the Blowdown team put down to the stress of being
    undercover for so long, until she is threatened by the same viral
    disease that is rampaging through both their bodies and is diagnosed
    as rabies. Weeks from death, Seliah is placed in a coma while she
    heals. LASD tries to convince Gravas that he too is ill.
    However, this is more than just a story about undercover agents
    on the Mexican border, drugs, guns and murder. Just who is the
    mysterious priest, Father Joe Left wich? Recognized as a local drugdealer and snitch, a.k.a. Mike Finnegan, who claims to have ridden
    with Murietta over one hundred and eighty years ago and the truth
    of the blood-transmitted disease becomes clearer.
    In this fast-paced, action thriller Parker has once again demonstrated
    the ability to keep his audience turning pages until the last drop of
    blood is accounted for, and provides just the right twist in the end.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 14, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A profound realistic look at the border problem from both sides

    Los Angeles sheriff's deputy thirtyish Charlie Hood continues to work for ATF as a loaner. Currently he and his partners are conducting surveillance of a house in the border town of Buenavista, California. Four North Baja Cartel gunmen are inside along with undercover ATF agent Sean Ozburn. A close friend of Hood, Ozburn poses as a gun dealing meth peddler.

    Abruptly Ozburn goes into rage and kills the cartel members before fleeing the massacre. Hood pursues his friend as he must bring Ozburn in. Meanwhile the rogue ATF agent offers the best gun on the market to a drug cartel leader while Hood's peer L.A. deputy Bradley Jones feels yanked by his ties to all the players.

    The key to the latest Hood police procedural (see Iron River) is the profound realistic look at the border problem from both sides; not just the illegal immigrants but a much more complicated issue. Instead, readers observe supply and demand at its purest with the sale of guns south to the Cartels and in the sale to American customers of drugs and girls. Fans will be hooked from the opening sequence when apparently undercover Agent Ozburn went rogue and never slows down until the final confrontation. Still with all this exhilarating testosterone making for a super tale, it is the economics of the Border Lords on both sides of the fence that brews bigger issues than long time staying illegals.

    Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2011

    Disappointed

    I was really looking firwatd to reading the latest book by T. Jefferson Parker. Unfortunately, it wasn't up to par. Storyline was hard to follow and just dont really care much for the Charlie Hood character.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2011

    love and action

    lots of action. undercover cop with a mission to kill the gun runners. he and wife are bitten by a bat and infected. dog is Daisy. enjoyed until the end....went flat.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 13, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Blood Lords

    There have been so many novels written about narco-trafficking and related issues that adding some mysticism could draw some readers who otherwise might think they had read it all. In Iron River, the Mike Finnegan character had some appeal, but here he is just plain creepy. I think that bats and vampires have their place in some novels, but they just demean the story here. In the end, The Border Lords has nothing of value to add.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)