Border Music by Robert James Waller, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Border Music

Border Music

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by Robert James Waller
     
 

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Texas Jack Carmine is a free soul, a rider of roads, and a man with secrets that stretch back to Vietnam and hungers that keep him from settling down. Linda Lobo is ready to ride with him, but they're not just headed back to his Texas ranch. They're headed for a passion that only happens once--and breaks your heart when it ends. HC: Warner.

Overview

Texas Jack Carmine is a free soul, a rider of roads, and a man with secrets that stretch back to Vietnam and hungers that keep him from settling down. Linda Lobo is ready to ride with him, but they're not just headed back to his Texas ranch. They're headed for a passion that only happens once--and breaks your heart when it ends. HC: Warner.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The lead sentence of Waller's potential bestseller is a first line that may turn up in quizzes, though not of the literary variety. ``When this nameless piece a' shit tore off Linda Lobo's G-string instead of sticking money in it... Texas Jack Carmine went crazy-over-the-edge....'' But make no mistake about it: while Texas Jack Carmine is neither as well-educated nor as well-spoken as Robert Kincaid or Michael Tillman, the protagonists of Waller's previous novels, he is equally intelligent, sensitive and romantic under the facade of his raunchy, beer-guzzling persona. With a twang in his voice matched by the low-down grit of Waller's prose, Jack is a restless man who lives ``sweet and free... a rider of summer roads, traveler of far places.'' After he impulsively rescues long-legged, ``high-assed'' Linda from her job in a Minnesota bar, he discovers that she is the woman of his dreams. Jack takes Linda home to his one-horse ranch in Texas where they enjoy an idyllic year, doomed to end, however, as readers realize immediately, since Waller applies foreshadowing with a sledgehammer touch. Jack's ``spells,'' flashbacks to the killing he did in Vietnam, are the reason that the lovers eventually part. But Jack assumes legendary proportions in the lives of everyone whose path he crosses; all eventually realize that "`he set us free... he loved us in a special way and in doin' so taught us to think better of ourselves.'' A silly subplot concerns Jack's disillusioned uncle Vaughn Rhomer, a produce manager in a Iowa supermarket, who secretly nurtures his own romantic dreams and adventures, and finally realizes that Jack has ``shown him the way.'' Waller is dangerously self-indulgent here; his style has become a shtick, and this story is all atmosphere and rugged sentiment and no action. His fans will probably buy it, but there's no magic in this tale. Major ad/promo; Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selection. (Feb.)
Library Journal
Although Waller's popularity may be on the wane-his Slow Waltz in Cedar Bend has sold "only" two million copies, compared with five million for The Bridges of Madison County-don't dismiss the metaphor-mangling romance writer as a flash in the pan. His latest tells of two star-crossed lovers who dare to confront their dark pasts.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780446602730
Publisher:
Grand Central Publishing
Publication date:
02/01/1996
Pages:
304
Product dimensions:
4.25(w) x 6.75(h) x 1.00(d)

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