Borderland: Origins of the American Suburb, 1820-1939 by John R. Stilgoe, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Borderland: Origins of the American Suburb, 1820-1939

Borderland: Origins of the American Suburb, 1820-1939

by John R. Stilgoe
     
 

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This fascinating 'prehistory' of the American suburb traces its evolution from the mid-1800s to the onset of World War II. Using a rich array of contemporary written and pictorial sources, prize-winning historian John R. Stilgoe guides us through the early suburbs of Manhattan, Boston, Chicago, and other cities, showing us not only how they looked but what life was

Overview

This fascinating 'prehistory' of the American suburb traces its evolution from the mid-1800s to the onset of World War II. Using a rich array of contemporary written and pictorial sources, prize-winning historian John R. Stilgoe guides us through the early suburbs of Manhattan, Boston, Chicago, and other cities, showing us not only how they looked but what life was like for the men and women who lived there.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Suburbia, claims Stilgoe, is a catch-all term that misleadingly lumps together all sorts of regionsscruffy frontier settlements, villages that sprang up along well-traveled roads, planned communities, towns built on their accessibility via horsecar and, later, streetcar. This leisurely foray into the history of U.S. suburbs shows that 19th and early 20th century Americans fled the cities for a wide variety of reasons. For the genteel, Shaker Heights, eight miles east of Cleveland, offered nostalgic appeal combined with natural beauty and urban conve nience. But the railroad and steamboat opened up the hinterlands around New York, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia and elsewhere to the lower and middle classes. Harvard professor Stilgoe concentrates here on visual topographyEnglish-style cottages, commuter platforms, porches, woodlands, antiquing. By combing rural journals, local newspapers, diaries, real estate ads and period drawings, his pleasantly illustrated ramble fills in the historical backdrop of the post-WW II mass exodus from urban decay. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Stilgoe deals with one American ideal, that of living in a carefully arranged natural setting, in the appearance of simple country lifean ideal that only the rich can afford. Winding roads, lots of trees, privacy, and safe homogeneity define these suburbs. Women busy themselves with horticulture, shopping, and village improvement. Men commute to work and play at being gentleman farmers. Stilgoe describes ``commuter country'' with abundant illustrations. While his book makes pleasant reading, it fails to consider the implications for American society: the effect of such suburbs on cities; and on women and children who don't fit the stereotype. Mary Drake McFeely, Univ. of Georgia Libs., Athens

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780300042573
Publisher:
Yale University Press
Publication date:
12/28/1988
Pages:
368

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