Borders of Socialism: Private Spheres of Soviet Russia

Overview

Offering an innovative and challenging lens to understand Soviet socialism, this fascinating book argues that in Russia the relations between culture and nation, art and life, commodity and trash, often diverged from familiar Western European or American versions of modernity. The essays show how public and private overlapped and shaped each other, creating new perspectives on individuals and society in the Soviet Union.

Read More Show Less
...
See more details below
Hardcover (First Edition)
$87.02
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$105.00 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (4) from $53.70   
  • New (1) from $97.72   
  • Used (3) from $53.70   
Sending request ...

Overview

Offering an innovative and challenging lens to understand Soviet socialism, this fascinating book argues that in Russia the relations between culture and nation, art and life, commodity and trash, often diverged from familiar Western European or American versions of modernity. The essays show how public and private overlapped and shaped each other, creating new perspectives on individuals and society in the Soviet Union.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
""In this unique and fascinating collection of essays, Lewis Siegelbaum and his kollektiv of authors explore the private spaces in socialist society. From cars and pets to apartments and peasant gardens, friendship circles to hooligans, they sketch a canvas that locates where the Soviet heart was and who Soviet man's best friend was. Soviet people found their own outlets for expression of what was most meaningful to them, and privacy survived in a world where the state, often ineffectively, hovered above the individual."
—Ronald Grigor Suny, Professor of History, The University of Michigan

"This is a wonderfully conceived, extraordinarily cohesive, and highly accessible volume. Each of the authors rejects a rigid distinction between public and private, and argues that under Soviet socialism, the distinction is especially fluid. A fascinating reassessment of the 'lived experience' of socialism, in which the Soviet Union's particular characteristics are understood as part of the much broader modern experience of public and private life."— Diane P. Koenker, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

"This lively and innovative volume, offering a fascinating selection of the newest scholarship on Soviet society in the Stalin and Khrushchev periods, will appeal to anyone who has ever wondered about the private lives of Soviet citizens and how they negotiated the boundaries between the private and the public."
—Sheila Fitzpatrick, University of Chicago

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781403969842
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 5/13/2006
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Lewis Siegelbaum is Professor of History at Michigan State University. He is the author of Stakhanovism and the Politics of Productivity in the USSR, 1935-1941 (1988), and co-author of Stalinism as a Way of Life: A Narrative in Documents (2000). He currently is working on a history of automobiles in the Soviet Union.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction: Mapping Private Spheres in the Soviet Context —Lewis H. Siegelbaum
Part One: Private Enterprise and Private Property* Claiming Property: The Soviet-Era Private Plots as "Women's Turf"—Esther Kingston-Mann
• The Art Market and the Construction of Soviet Russian Culture—Andrew Jenks
• Separate Yet Governed: The Representation of Soviet Property Relations in Civil Law and Public Discourse—Charles Hachten
• Cars, Cars, and More Cars: The Faustian Bargain of the Brezhnev Era —Lewis H. Siegelbaum
Part Two: Domesticity and Domestic Space
• Domestic Life and the Activist Wife in the 1930s Soviet Union—Rebecca Neary
• A Hearth for a Dog: The Paradoxes of Soviet Pet Keeping—Amy Nelson
• The Meaning of Home: "The Only Bit of the World You Can Have to Yourself"—Susan E. Reid
• "I Know All the Secrets of My Neighbors": The Quest for Privacy in the Era of the Separate Apartment—Steven E. Harris
• Private Matters or Public Crimes: The Emergence of Domestic Hooliganism in the Soviet Union, 1939-1966—Brian LaPierre
Part Three: Behavior and Private Life
• A Symbiosis of Errors: The Personal, Professional, and Political in the Kirov Region, 1931-1941—Larry E. Holmes
• Friends in Private, Friends in Public: The Phenomenon of the Kompaniia Among Soviet Youth in the 1950s and 60s —Juliane Fürst
• The 1959 Liriki-Fiziki Debate: Going Public with the Private?—Susan Costanzo

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)