The Borgias and Their Enemies

The Borgias and Their Enemies

3.7 27
by Christopher Hibbert
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

The first major biography of the Borgias in thirty years, Christopher Hibbert's latest history brings the family and the world they lived in?the glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissance?to life.

The name  See more details below

Overview

The first major biography of the Borgias in thirty years, Christopher Hibbert's latest history brings the family and the world they lived in?the glittering Rome of the Italian Renaissance?to life.

The name

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547415918
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/06/2008
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
503 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Borgias and Their Enemies 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
GriffsPal More than 1 year ago
Hibbert's familial biography of the Borgias was surprisingly interesting; but I've realized, thinking back to past books of history I've relished, that I love the breezy style with which British authors often approach such large subjects: you are swept away by the force of the writing; and, if you are like me, are willing to let go the notion you would remember the name of every personage mentioned, let alone know who they were. I was captivated by page fifteen, if I recall. What Hibbert subtly manages to bring into focus is the pageantry of the times, and how it clashed with the ugly actions (see below) of Rodrigo and Cesare Borgia, in particular. Hibbert refuses to let the reader believe that anything written during Lucrezia's youth was indeed true of her. Again, he does this with delicacy, pointing to the difference in propaganda and sensationalism (yes, they existed in the 15th century) and the actual record. In fact, the book's main "characters," so to speak, are the Borgia pere and fils, Cesare and Juan, those men who wielded power and misused it. We are left with no doubt as to how they achieved their status and rank (in the sons' case, by the mandates or bullying of the father.) Much of what they did is reprehensible and vile. My only connection to this time period is reading about the authors of the period, in light connection to studies of 16th century English and French literature. That was a long time ago, but I did summon it up, as I did about 5 months ago when, stuck home with a stomach bug, I watched the first season of a European television series entitled simply "Borgia." The first season covers the first year or two of Rodrigo Borgia (the father of Cesare and Lucrezia)'s accession to the papacy. (He became pope Alexander VI, known for dividing the Western world between Portugal and Spain, and for continuing to allow the selling of indulgences, cardinalships, etc., that led to the Reformation.) I don't recommend the television show to anyone put off by violence, nudity, lewd sexual conduct or references to and scenes of homicide, incest, torture, and rape. But the creators sum up the spirit of the times quite well. One truth that the television show does convey, that Hibbert only has time to hint, is that the Borgias simply were perhaps more openly ruthless than their ruthless contemporaries, not more so, and never sui generis. Hibbert has quotes some contemporaries who mention the fearlessness with which they acted, and their willingness to barter and bribe at will, for what they desired. I'm sure, friends, that you will see me occasionally read books about this period; and for any history, you bet that I will know be looking for the shorter books by English authors who write as if they have been doing it since they were old enough to pick up a pen.
sunnhauntr More than 1 year ago
An engrossing tale of Roderigo Borgia paying his way to the head of the papacy as Alexander VI, arranging political marriages for his children (then annuling them when it suits his aspirations), and backing his murderous son as a holy terror for anyone who tries to stand in their way of power. Hibbert engages his readers in such a way that they almost feel sorry for the bad guys.
ArAndrews More than 1 year ago
wonderfully written book
anonymously More than 1 year ago
retellling the Borgis story better than many have done
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a provocative read about the Borgia family and their powerful connections to the papacy in the 1500 - 1600s. Political and religious rulers of the former Roman empire set the stage for this family of merciless, power hungry individuals and gives the reader a glimpse of life in Italy from the perspective of the ruling class. If one thinks the Church elders of today are bereft of morals and compassion, have a look at what their predecessors took part in from centuries ago and wonder if much has changed.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He walks in, holding his bag
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I walk up next to Blythe. "So whats wrong with Micheal?" I say worried.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
* drops off his things and sits in a bed*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
More fun than showtimes the borgias
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Thank you!" She yells sacrastically. "Hades...childeren....pact...thinking......Percy..." She mutters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
He almost laughs but he keeps his face emotionless "why are you still in here though" he asks her
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slept
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sits on his bed