Borrowed Heaven

Borrowed Heaven

4.7 9
by The Corrs
     
 

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Sibling act the Corrs have attained international superstardom by melding well-crafted contemporary pop with the immutable strains of their Irish heritage. Borrowed Heaven -- the group's first studio album since 2000's breakthrough In Blue -- once again colors the radio-friendly productions, rife with subtle dance beats and loops

Overview

Sibling act the Corrs have attained international superstardom by melding well-crafted contemporary pop with the immutable strains of their Irish heritage. Borrowed Heaven -- the group's first studio album since 2000's breakthrough In Blue -- once again colors the radio-friendly productions, rife with subtle dance beats and loops, with the Celtic flourishes intrinsic to the Corrs' sound. "Angel," an homage to the foursome's mother, intertwines a penny whistle with an infectious hook, and the ethereal, album-closing instrumental, "Silver Strand," is accented by sparse piano and fiddle. Like the band's previous discs, Borrowed Heaven is marked by the group's trademark harmonies and acute songwriting, as displayed on impressive original numbers like the Andrea Corr–penned "Confidence," with its rich vocal arrangements and dance beat–layered message of self-reliance. But as always, the Corrs do equally well tackling songs by others, such as "Time Enough for Tears," a gorgeous lullaby co-written by Bono and featured in the Jim Sheridan film In America. This confluence of traditional and modern sounds comes together splendidly in the uplifting title cut, featuring a mix of William Orbit–flavored beats, a dollop of fiddle, and a spine-tingling choral outro by special guests Ladysmith Black Mambazo. Despite having attained a degree of success that's found them playing command performances for the likes of Nelson Mandela and President Bill Clinton, the Corrs forge ahead with their homey blend of pop colored by glints of the Emerald Isle.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - David Jeffries
Their detractors still whine about how the Corrs used to be so Celtic (they were somewhat, but not to the degree the bellyaching infers) and now they're so light in the substance department (so was ABBA; so what?). They'll hate this one because Borrowed Heaven is light as a feather, but what harmonies, what presentation. While it's lighter in singles than their better albums, Borrowed Heaven benefits plenty from the bright, slightly electronica, and crystal-clear production courtesy of Olle Romo. While former producers -- bombastateers Robert John "Mutt" Lange and Glen Ballard -- brought the band big productions with big possibilities, Romo offers a more intimate Corrs, better for sitting in your room than spinning in the sunlight. With no hip-hop or punk angst on Borrowed Heaven, the band is out of touch with 2004 radio, so creating a fan's album ends up both a smart and comfortable move. Minus the bubbly good and pretty vacant kickoff single, "Summer Sunshine," plus a couple mundane fluff fillers, Borrowed Heaven is the most personal Corrs album since their debut, and you can't help but feel that it's due to Romo's light touch. He's out of the picture when need be, but always there with an interesting studio trick when the album starts spinning its wheels. The best example is the exchange between his synth fills and the band's boisterous reel on "Angel," but you can also choose the way he makes the band actually sound funky on "Humdrum" or the way he tones down the Bono and Gavin Friday-penned "Time Enough for Tears" to a believable and touching level. Andrea Corr's performance here is serene and more sincere than the one she did for the In America soundtrack, and it anchors the album. Ladysmith Black Mambazo guest on the title track, a dreamy, Peter Gabriel-styled number with another great performance from Andrea. Lyrically, the more intimate Corrs are fine and forgettable most of the time, but occasionally clichés are delivered in such an earnest manner they're hard to ignore (the death-of-a-loved-one song "Goodbye" opens with the good old "I never thought you would leave"). Borrowed Heaven's lyric sheet is filled with high-school diary hackneyed favorites, but if you like your pop -- unadulterated pop -- presented and played extremely well, you're cheating yourself if you don't check it out.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/08/2004
Label:
Atlantic
UPC:
0075678367021
catalogNumber:
83670

Tracks

  1. Summer Sunshine
  2. Angel
  3. Hideaway
  4. Long Night
  5. Goodbye
  6. Time Enough for Tears
  7. Humdrum
  8. Even If
  9. Borrowed Heaven
  10. Confidence
  11. Baby Be Brave
  12. Silver Strand

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Corrs   Primary Artist
Ladysmith Black Mambazo   Background Vocals,Musician
Anto Drennan   Guitar
Bob O'Brien   Musician
John O'Brien   Musician
Tim Pierce   Guitar,Musician
Jeff Babko   Piano,Musician
Caroline Corr   Percussion,Drums,Background Vocals,Bodhran
Andrea Corr   Vocals,Background Vocals,tin whistle
Sharon Corr   Violin,Background Vocals
Jim McGorman   Piano,Musician
Jim Corr   Acoustic Guitar,Piano,Electric Guitar,Keyboards
Jon Button   Double Bass,Upright Bass,Musician
Pecko Erkesjo   Bass,Bass Guitar,Musician
Anto Orennsn   Guitar,Musician
Max Surla   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Ladysmith Black Mambazo   Engineer
Gavin Friday   Composer
Bono   Composer
Steve MacMillan   Engineer
Tim Martin   Engineer
Bob O'Brien   Band Technician
John O'Brien   Programming
Olle Romo   Programming,Producer,Engineer,Audio Production
Maurice Seezer   Composer
Bill Farrell   Pre-programming
Corrs   Composer
J.B. Arthur   Engineer
Andrea Corr   Whistle
Henry McGroggan   Tour Manager
Max Surla   Orchestration,Orchestral Arrangements
John O'Brien   Programming

Customer Reviews

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Borrowed Heaven 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
They're finally back! The Corrs have returned with an impressive new album that makes up for the time they've spent away from the spotlight. Every song on the CD is undeniably entertaining and is worth your money! The first single "Summer Sunshine" is the new anthem for summer '04, and having heard previews of all the other songs on the album, I assure you, you will not be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Couldn't wait for it to finally come out. I found the group to be stronger this time around. Every song with it's Celtic vibes coming through is like reading a good book.....you don't want it to end. Thanks for Borrowing Heaven and lending it to us. I loved it!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Corrs have evolved their Celtic kissed pop sound into an astonishing mix of modern and traditional elements. "Borrowed Heaven" recalls the days when people bought albums for their full content and not random singles. The quality of the album is unwavering. It delivers both musically and lyrically. It's also a wonderfully diverse album exploring everything from soul to jazz to trance music, all the while never neglecting the signature harmonies and Celtic influences that brought The Corrs international acclaim. It's hard to pick out highlights on an album where all the songs are strong, but the ethnic rhythm of the title track provides great power on a song that serves as a meditation on existence, with a spellbinding outro from Ladysmith Black Mambazo. There is much to like on "Borrowed Heaven" not the least of which is the maturity and depth of the music for which the Corrs are rarely given credit. So buy it--you won't be sorry.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Nearly ten years have passed since their debut album Forgiven not Forgotten, and the siblings from Dundalk reflect that maturity on Borrowed Heaven. I have to agree with the reviewer from All Music Guide, the Corrs never were that Celtic to begin with (one almost thinks the sound of their first album was enforced by confused record execs, Runaway which was a song they performed before their record deal is not Celtic at all and their parents raised them on American pop music). 2000’s In Blue has been criticized as being too commercial (and does indeed have a Europop sound to it), however, the Corrs are a pop band and if you’re looking for pure listening pop with beautiful lyrics and a singer with a beautiful voice, this CD is for you. Summer Sunshine is a bittersweet song about a secret love. The rocking Angel is a fitting tribute to the foursome’s mother who passed away during the recording of In Blue. Long Night brings to mind a 80s hair band ballad (although the violin gives it a way). Time Enough for Tears seems almost misplaced on this album despite its beauty, it is very minimalist in presentation, completely unCorr like with Andrea’s voice accompanied mostly by brother Jim on piano. Humdrum is by far the best piece on the album, it’s funky sound and witty lyrics echoing current Liz Phair. Even If is traditional Corrs pop, even if the intro sounds a bit like Summer Sunshine. The title track recorded in South Africa will bring chills to your spine and the lyrics in your head. Baby Be Brave is another classic Corrs song a fitting ending of the vocal tracks. It wouldn’t be a Corrs album without an instrumental and while not uplifting as Rebel Dream or as party inspiring as Toss the Feathers, Silver Strand is a haunting Celtic melody written for their first album. In a way, it’s a fitting conclusion to a this album and the long trip from their first album when lead singer Andrea Corr was still in her teens to the maturity shown on this new album. Sadly, this album will probably not bring them radio play on most commercial stations in the US, but this is definitely an album to pick up and savor.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although, it has been years since a release of a new albulm, this new one has been worth the wait. Great Irish background music, combinded with greap pop motion, makes this cd one to talk about.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lead singer Andrea Corr's pure, rich voice has never sounded better. The Celtic influences are back after being sadly abandoned on their last album, the hopelessly bland "In Blue." Musically they've broadened their scope to include a variety of musical styles which all work to surprising, yet totally satisfying, effect. Lyrically they've matured, most notably Andrea, who penned the lyrics to 7 of the 12 tracks--including the album's best songs: the astonishing spiritual title track "Borrowed Heaven" and the moody, trance inspired "Baby Be Brave." Overall, this diverse collection of songs is the perfect album for those looking for a quality album from start to finish.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This album is okay, but to me they lack some of the pizzazz that they've had in the past. Also, some of the songs have lyrics that don't make sence, so the songs are harder to get into.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have loved the Corrs since they first came onto the radio here in Michigan. I have pretty much every cd they've done. I love how they've learned to blend the traditional Irish music with the pop music. I think that this is easily one of my more favorite cd's they've done. I am particularily fond of the song "Angel." I love the up beat nature of the song and how much fun it is to sing along to. I think that they've really grown on this cd. And I think that the song "Barrowed Heaven" really reflects that. I would recomend this cd to a friend!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago