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Boss Lady

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Overview

Tracy Ellison, the star of Omar Tyree's Flyy Girl and For the Love of Money, returns in this bestselling novel, Boss Lady. Everybody's favorite flyy girl is a little bit older, a whole lot wiser, and just as sassy as ever. After a series of triumphs in the world of letters and acting, Tracy takes on the dazzling world of Hollywood's A-list players to film a project close to her heart.

Told from the point of view of Tracy's cousin and personal assistant, Vanessa, Boss Lady ...

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Overview

Tracy Ellison, the star of Omar Tyree's Flyy Girl and For the Love of Money, returns in this bestselling novel, Boss Lady. Everybody's favorite flyy girl is a little bit older, a whole lot wiser, and just as sassy as ever. After a series of triumphs in the world of letters and acting, Tracy takes on the dazzling world of Hollywood's A-list players to film a project close to her heart.

Told from the point of view of Tracy's cousin and personal assistant, Vanessa, Boss Lady chronicles the trials and tribulations of adapting the story of Tracy Ellison's life. In this novel, Flyy Girl is becoming a major motion picture and Tracy is prepared to do anything and everything to tell her story and to make sure it's done right, from screenwriting to producing to designing. In the meantime, she's also juggling the highs and lows of her famously turbulent love life. Is it better to remain single and committed to her career? Or is she ready to take the plunge and embrace the married-with-children life?

Written with Omar Tyree's irresistible urban style, Boss Lady finds the author's best-loved character at the top of her game, thoroughly in charge, and taking life strictly on her own terms.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Tracy Ellison Grant is in charge again in Tyree's latest Flyy Girl novel (after For the Love of Money and Flyy Girl), this time as mentor to her go-getter younger cousin, Vanessa Tracy Smith, who narrates this glitzy urban story about the payoff of hard work. Tracy Grant rose to fame earlier with her autobiography Flyy Girl, which she parlayed into a booming career as a screenwriter, actress and producer. Now, an adoring and ambitious 16-year-old Vanessa moves from North Philly to L.A., and the novel tracks her three-year meteoric rise as Tracy's personal assistant and protegee to Hollywood powerbroker. Vanessa quickly learns the Hollywood game and takes the initiative to create a Flyy Girl franchise, including a sassy clothing line, while also pushing her older cousin to turn her autobiography into a movie. Tracy, Vanessa and friends hit the road to launch the Flyy Girl brand and conduct nationwide Flyy girl movie casting calls, a coming-of-age trip that teaches Vanessa important lessons in life and business. Snappy dialogue and the inspirational plot make this a readable story, but the plot drifts along without a climax-except for the evening a 20-year-old Vanessa loses her virginity. Devotees of the Flyy Girl trilogy will enjoy this addendum. (July) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Tracy Ellison, of Flyy Girl and For the Love of Money fame, is back-this time in a book narrated in Flyy Girl-style, but with fewer expletives, by her younger cousin and personal assistant, Vanessa. Rescued from North Philadelphia by now successful filmmaker Tracy, Vanessa, a beautiful and serious-minded college freshman, finds herself immune to Hollywood's elegant parties and smooth-talking players. She concentrates instead on persuading Tracy to return to her roots and film Flyy Girl for all of the young urban women who loved Tracy's autobiographical coming-of-age story, "written with Omar Tyree." While launching a Flyy Girl clothing line and doing preliminary movie auditions back in Philly, Vanessa discovers that, although she may not be as creative as Tracy, she has her own strengths. Frequent, self-congratulatory references to Flyy Girl as a publishing phenomenon may annoy some; however, this book should be a hit with Tyree fans and readers clamoring for more urban fiction. Recommended for popular fiction collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 3/15/05.]-Laurie A. Cavanaugh, Brockton P.L., MA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743228725
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 5/23/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 784,726
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

New York Times bestselling author Omar Tyree is the winner of the 2001 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work—Fiction, and the 2006 Phillis Wheatley Literary Award for Body of Work in Urban Fiction. He has published more than twenty books on African-American people and culture, including five New York Times bestselling novels. He is a popular national speaker, and a strong advocate of urban literacy. Born and raised in Philadelphia, he lives in Charlotte, North Carolina. Learn more at OmarTyree.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Vanessa

Hi. My name is Vanessa Tracy Smith. I'm Tracy Ellison's oldest second cousin on her mother's side. Many of you first read of me in Tracy's sequel book, For the Love of Money. But some of you are a little confused now. That's okay. I'll explain everything.

My big cousin Tracy became famous ten years ago after publishing the story of her life in a book called Flyy Girl, as told to author Omar Tyree. She finished undergraduate school at Hampton University in Virginia, and continued school to receive a master's degree in English. Mission accomplished, she moved back home to Philadelphia, passed all of her teaching certificate exams, and found a job as a junior high school English teacher. However, my cousin could never be satisfied as a schoolteacher. Not the flyy girl. So after thinking it over, she decided to quit her job as a schoolteacher and move to Hollywood, California, to chase her dreams as a poet and screenwriter. She had already written two volumes of unpublished poetry.

Out in Hollywood, Tracy took a few courses in screenwriting at UCLA, made friends in the television industry, and worked herself from an assistant writer position for a science fiction show on cable, into a proven staff writer and a freelancer for some of the major networks. But my cousin didn't stop there. In perfect flyy girl mode, she attempted to create her own sitcom, Georgia Peaches, about a southern girl trying to break into the music and entertainment industry. Failing at that, she penned her first feature-length screenplay entitled Led Astray, about an African-American woman who exacts revenge on several Hollywood players who betray her.

While continuing to make new friends in high places, my cousin not only found a producer and a studio to develop and green-light her first film, but she walked away with the starring role and an associate producer credit.

Led Astray went on to triple its budget in ticket sales at the box office, my cousin became an instant star, and she was able to sign on the dotted line for a lucrative, three-film deal worth millions of dollars.

Pretty unbelievable, isn't it? I would say. But that's when I come in.

I had been told about my big cousin Tracy ever since I was a toddler. But what I heard of her was rarely a good thing. My mother would beat me over the head with negatives about my cousin as if it was a punishment.

"Girl, you think you're so damn cute. You act just like your cousin Tracy. The world don't revolve around you!"

Granted, I barely even knew who Tracy was at the time. It wasn't as if she visited me, my mother, and my sisters while we relocated like nomads to different run-down apartments and houses in North Philadelphia, with my mother chasing her crazy ideas of love. All I knew was that Tracy was my mother's first cousin, and that she was raised in a stable home in the better parts of Germantown. However, I had seen pictures of her, and if my mother believed that naming me Tracy and berating me with how similar I was to my namesake would somehow stop me from trying to emulate my cousin, she was wrong.

All of my mother's name-dropping only made me think of Tracy night and day, whether she visited us in North Philly or not. My cousin soon became the focus point of my constant daydreams of a better life. Then her first book came out.

You would think my mother would have known about the book as much as she seemed to despise Tracy. But my mother was never much of a reader. So she didn't know about the book that had her name, my aunt Marie, my grandmother Marsha, and my great aunts Patti, Joy, and Tanya in it until I had first started to read Flyy Girl at age eleven. It had been out for a few years by this time, and it had not been published nationally yet. It was still kind of underground.

I hid the book from my mother and read it day and night for three days straight until she finally caught me with it in my room. I was all the way at the end and had gotten a little careless with it.

She asked me, "What's that you readin'?"

I didn't even notice my mother when she walked into my room. I was just so into that book. It had me hypnotized. It was that good. But I got so nervous from being busted that I fumbled the book out of my hands and dropped it on the floor.

I mumbled, "Ummm..."

I was terrified and didn't know what to say. My mother could read the surprise all over my face. I was sure she knew about the book. I tried to pick it up and hide it from her, like a fool.

"Gimme the damn book, girl," she told me.

"Mom, it's just a book," I whined.

"Vanessa, if you don't give me that damn book, I will break your damn hands!"

I was still hesitant until my mother reached out and snatched it from me.

"Gimme this damn book, girl!"

My little sisters looked at me as if I was nuts.

"All that over a book."

They didn't get books like I did. I had a lot more to dream about, I guess.

Anyway, my mother read the title out loud.

"'Flyy Girl. Inside the big city there's a mad obsession for gold, sex, and money.' " She looked at me and asked, "What are you doin' readin' this? And who gave this to you? Is this some kind of X-rated sex book?"

My two younger sisters began to eye me in alarm with hushed silence and wide eyes.

I was confused as I don't know what. Didn't my mother know about Tracy's book? I had given her the benefit of the doubt, but maybe she didn't know. Then she studied the artwork on the cover, with the gold earrings that read Tracy in script, and she just froze.

"What in the world..."

My mother was as shocked as I was. I was shocked that she didn't know about it, and she was shocked that she was just finding out.

Then I got slick and tried to downplay it.

"It's just a book about some girl growing up in Philly, Mom."

My mother ignored me and began to flip through the pages after reading the back cover summaries.

"Where did you get this book?"

I didn't want to tell. Tracy's book was quite mature for an eleven-year-old girl to read. It was detailed with graphic sex and hard language. So my friends had all been hiding it from their mothers. We all realized that it was hard-boiled and secretive material.

"You better tell me, girl," my mother warned me.

"Friends," I answered.

"What friends?"

"Just friends, Mom."

She was headed for the third degree, and it was beginning to look like a very long night.

"I want names, girl."

By that time, my sisters were no longer silent.

"Uuueww, Va-nes-sa."

"Shut up!" I screamed at them.

I was irritated by the whole thing.

My mother said, "No, you shut up, Vanessa. And you tell me what I wanna know. Right now! I want names!"

To make a long story short, my mother got me to tell on my circle of friends, who had all realized before she did that the book was about our cousin.

So my mother got to calling around to all of our family members, and they all confirmed it, which gave me an even lower level of respect for her. I mean, how could she not know?

Anyway, that drove an even bigger wedge between my cousin Tracy and I ever meeting and getting to know each other. My mother was convinced that I would run around and try to be flyy in the same fast ways that Tracy had. But I was already my own person. I could see where letting guys have their way with a girl had led my mother into having three girls from three different daddies. So I was in no way ready to allow a book to influence me to do something that real life had already shown me an ugly reflection of. My girls and I all knew better than to live how Tracy had; we all read the book as a tale of what we shouldn't do, as opposed to how many of our parents felt about it. They were not giving us much credit for our intelligence.

A few years later, Flyy Girl was picked up by a major publisher, and it was in bookstores everywhere. My mother had given up on trying to keep me away from it, along with thousands of other teenaged girls' mothers. And a powerful thing was beginning to happen; girls who wouldn't be caught dead reading a book were all of a sudden swearing by my cousin's book. I was so proud of her that I didn't know what to do with myself.

I realized that Tracy had attended Hampton University, and I wanted to go to a black college, too. Tracy wrote poetry, and I wanted to write poetry, too. Tracy had lived her life the way she wanted to, and I wanted to live and learn from her mistakes and not make them. And when I finally got a chance to hang out with my cousin after years of dreaming about her, I wanted to make sure I kept my cool. I didn't want to come off as a geek or anything. I had read what she thought about Girls High and Central being "nerd schools," and my high school, Engineering & Science, was in the same vein as those. But I was also certain that Tracy would feel differently about education as an adult, and she would be proud that I attended E&S and had maintained good grades. Even her brother Jason had graduated from E&S. I just wanted to make sure that my cousin would be nothing but proud of me when I finally met her.

We finally met and hung out in the spring of my sophomore year, and Tracy was very open with me about everything. She complained about how much her life had changed since breaking into Hollywood, but at my school, we were still sweating her for her book. I don't think she understood how much of an impact her book had had on urban American girls. Tracy was more concerned about her present and future, like most go-getters are. They don't live in the yesterday, they live in the now and the tomorrow. So I accepted my cousin's complaints and allowed her to say her piece about fame and fortune, and the ups and downs of wealth and popularity. She even had a frank discussion with me about boys, just when I had one who could have broken me. Talk about your perfect timing.

Nevertheless, my mother wasn't having it. She bitched about me hanging out with Tracy as if the world was coming to an end. She gave my cousin no respect at all, as if she was still a teenager looking for a hot boyfriend. Tracy deserved much more respect than that. She worked damned hard for hers, and no man had gotten in her way.

So when my wildest dream was realized — Tracy asking me if I wanted to spend a summer in California with her — I was blown away. I mean, like, wow! I had waited my whole life for that. Not that I would have died if it didn't happen, but I surely wasn't going to turn it down once it did. That's when the shit hit the fan. My mother went into overdrive and started nagging me about everything. She was getting on my last damn nerve!

Honestly, I saw nothing left that I could gain from my mother. She couldn't pay my way to college. She couldn't help me with my ideas and aspirations. And she didn't have anything left to teach me. I could even get better jobs than she could once I finished high school, because my mother never applied herself enough to master anything. But there she was trying to deny me the opportunity of a lifetime instead of supporting me. It wasn't as if I would just up and leave the family. It was only for a summer.

Tracy's invitation to Hollywood was the end of the end for my mother and me. The beginning of our problems had started a long time ago, and we were both ready to explode. So when I started reading up on Hollywood to prepare myself for Tracy's world, my mother went right ahead and pressed my last button.

She snatched my Entertainment Weekly magazine right out of my hands and shouted, "Do your fucking homework!"

I mean, that wasn't even called for. I was just sitting on the living room sofa, minding my own business, when she walked in from work and said that to me. It was nearly nine o'clock at night, and my homework had been finished before seven. My mother knew that. I always completed my schoolwork early. She was just trying to pick a fight with me, like a jealous hater. She wouldn't even allow me to work after school. My job was to look after my younger sisters every day. And I was just tired of it; tired of everything.

I stood up and said, "Mom, I've already finished my homework. Now can I have my magazine back, please?"

I knew she wasn't going to give it to me. I was already preparing myself to fight her. I had backed down from my mother before because I had nowhere else to go. But once Tracy offered me somewhere else to go...Well, that was it for my mother's bullshit.

She responded to my request by smacking me upside the head with the magazine and shouting, "You're not going to any damn California. So you don't even need to be reading this shit."

Isn't that pitiful of a grown woman? I couldn't believe she was acting like that. So I grabbed the magazine to stop her from hitting me with it, only for her to smack me in the face with her free hand. I used to cry when my mother treated me like that before, but not anymore. I mean, how much can a daughter take just because someone's your mother? It's not as if I was running the streets and getting into trouble like Tracy had done. I was an obedient, intelligent, and dutiful virgin like Tracy's girlfriend, Raheema, and I was being ignored and disrespected in the same way that she had been.

I had no more tears left to cry over my mother. She was wrong. So I backed away from her and let her have it with a straight right hand to her mouth. My mother's head popped back like a rag doll and it shocked both of us. I felt for sure that my life was going to end right there, but when my mother tried to attack me, I held her away from me with both hands and was actually stronger than she was. I couldn't believe it! I'm not a strong girl at all, or at least not physically, but it was just in me at that moment to fight her for my life and for my own dreams.

I'm not telling every girl to do what I did, but that's just how it went down for me. And if someone wants to blame my cousin Tracy for that...Well, I can't stop them. But I look at it as if it was fate. As crazy as it may sound, it was like my whole life had been preparing me for a meeting with my cousin, and my mother had started it all when I was a kid. It was like she knew all along that I would leave her for Tracy, and my mother was already preparing herself to hate my cousin for it.

So after my mother threw my high yellow behind out, I ended up at my great-aunt Patti's house in Germantown, where she called Tracy in California. Tracy was back out in Hollywood to shoot her next film, a thriller called Road Kill. I explained to her what happened with my mom, she listened to me, and the next thing I knew, arrangements were being made for me to join her for the summer in California. But since Tracy didn't really have time to spare while she finished filming her new movie, she planned to fly her brother Jason out to California for the summer as well, just to keep an eye out on me.

Copyright © 2005 by Omar Tyree

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Table of Contents

Contents

Vanessa

What to Do with Jason?

Personal Assistant

Let's Make It Happen!

The Game Plan

Like Lightning

The Quiet Before the Storm

Philadelphia

Wow!

The Marriott

Day 2

Sisters

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Loose Ends

Family Affairs

Focused

Smoke Screens

Locations

Withdraw

Back to Hollywood

Exhausted

New Flavor

My Turn

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(8)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 23 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2006

    Boss Lady

    This book was so amazing! I actually felt as though I was there with her from every moment of the day to every second at night. I spent every free moment I had reading, because I just couldn't get enough. Some scenes inspired me to go out there and meet more people and never to be a closed book, but to be open to new expieriences and new people.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2014

    2 stars

    Very hard to get into.

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  • Posted July 13, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Boss Lady

    A little bit on the boring side, but once i read towards the end, it had gotten better. The first 2 books about Tracy Ellison was a lot more interesting than Boss Lady.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2007

    I love this Book!

    I love omar Tyree and his novels. Reading boss lady just kept me on the end of my seat i never wanted to put the book down. I love to read so when i read the book i was happy i read it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2006

    this is a wonderful book

    i think this book is a great book for young teenagers.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2006

    This was Great!!!

    This book was great. Omar Tyree makes Tracy seem so real. I loved it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2006

    The truth

    Ok the truth about is this book is that it's a real life experience. Although it is fiction it states real life facts in the way things are ran in White America. Meaning the Hollywood scene and the way it is ran when dealing with actors of different ethnicities. To see the way that Tracy has grown into an even stronger black woman makes here a real life hero for young black females. Tracy has proven that no matter what mistakes you may have made in the past you can over come them. Your past does not have to determine your future. She shows us all that the foundations we first build are not the final product but the beginning to the smooth lay out we will live on. Not only has she proven that a dream can be achieved but she also shows us that there are some willing to lend a hand by taking in her cousin and giving her the opportunity to do the same. Vanessa is the s**t pardon my French but sister girl is real. She refuses to get caught up in the hype. She came with a plan and she sticks with it the hole way threw. She even try¿s to bring some of her girls with her on the come up, but at the same time she knows not to mix business with the pleasures of friendship. She knows that if the people holding the job's cant get it done then she is just going to have someone who can get it done. Not only is she smart but she is sexy with the right amount of class. Yet she has a silent street about her that keeps her from dealing with the BS anyone might try to put down. Well I guess to some it up both women are doing their things I mean it really doesn't get any better than that. I need to know what else is going on, I need to see more. Don¿t leave me hanging Omar please I need to know is there a movie in the making for the worlds #1 Fly Girls. Is there a wedding planed for the sexiest black couple to touch base from philli to Cali? Is love in the air for the independent but oh so fly no longer a girl but stunning woman Tracy Ellison Grant? Has Vanessa finally met a man that¿s her match? Come on Omar these are the things I¿m dying to know.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2006

    The second best in the triology in my opinion.

    I dont know about the people who didnt like it but I KNOW I did. I'm an reader who doesnt like to put down a book until it done. Reading books are like watching movies, i dont want to stop until its over. And thats what happened. Flyy Girl was the best, For the love of money was ok but Boss Lady was a lot better then For the love of money. Im doin a part of Boss Lady for my Prose forensics peace. So yes I really liked it. It made me want to do more in the business and further my career.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2005

    Let's just say I wasted over $20 on this book

    I thought this book was very boring. FLyy Girl was very good, which is the first book to the sequal For the Love of Money. But I didn't even like for the Love of Money. To come up with Boss Lady, Omar should have atleast based it on Tracy instead of her cousin who we really didn't care anything about. If you wanted to write about her cousin, who we knew nothing about from the previous novels, you should have written a whole new book. I would have rather learned more about Tracy's life and have Victor pop up somewhere. This was extremely boring and I would have to say no one should waste their money and time with this one unless you would actually like to learn about Tracy's cousin.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2005

    Let it go, dawg...

    While I thoroughly enjoyed Flyy Girl, I feel it would have been best left at that one book. Trying to keep the momentum going is commendable, but honestly, it's just not happening. For Love of Money was hard to get through, and this one I simply could not stomach.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2005

    BOSS LADY WAS THE TRUTH

    I THINK THAT BOSS LADY WAS OFF THE CHAINS, IF YOU FOLLOWED THE 2 PREVIOUS BOOKS THEN YOU WILL ENJOY IT. YOU WANT TO KNOIW WHAT HAS BEEN GOING ON IN TRACY'S LIFE SINCE THE LAST TIME SHE SHARED WITH US IN FOR THE LOVE OF MONEY. IF U R A TRUE FLYY GIRL THEN U WILL WANT TO READ IT. I READ IT IN 2 DAYS AND I THINK IT WAS GREAT.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2005

    A great book

    I think BOSS LADY was a great book! it made me think about having kids and getting my career started. The original flyy girl is back!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2005

    Oh my GOD I couldnt put it down

    The book was Hottttt if you want to know about it go to the book store or the library and pick it up you wont regret it TRUST

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2005

    Borrow this one

    I have enjoyed other books by Omar and usually go through a book in two/three days tops. However, it took me six days to read this one. I was dissappointed the way it ended...will there make a flyy girll movie? He left a lot of room for the guessing game.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2005

    Boss Lady was very very hard to get through!!!!

    I am an avid reader, and most of the time, once I start a book, I like to finish it rather I am enjoying it or not, so that I can see what happens. It took me several weeks to get through Boss Lady. I think that Omar Tyree wrote this book for some extra CASH, because it is one of the most boring books I've ever read.....As mentioned earlier by someone, the plot was very weak. The ending was abrupt, I hope that he is not planning to write another book along this story line, because it gives his readers nothing to look forward to.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 29, 2005

    DAMN I HAVEN'T EVEN READ IT AND SOUNDS OFF THE HOOK!!!!

    Well with my past experience with omar tyree i think with this book he's finally pulled it through for tracy so i give it a 5 star without even reading it yet!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2005

    I enjoyed it

    The book was very interesting. Once I started reading the novel, I couldn't put it down. Unlike Flyy Girl, the book doesn't contain all the sex. I enjoy reading Omar Tyree's book because there not all the same. In the novel, Boss Lady, you can see that Omar Tyree has made a transition. I would recommend the novel to all Flyy Girl fans.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2005

    READERS SAY BOSS LADY BY OMAR TYREE HAS WHAT IT TAKES FOR THE BIG SCREEN!

    Readers who have read Mr. Omar Tyree¿s books like, Flyy Girl and For the Love of Money which everyone knows catapulted the author to mega- national best selling status and have earned him a NAACP Image Award, and placement on the NY Times best selling list, boldly returns with his latest novel, Boss Lady, which may quite possibly be one of his best works to date for the depth of history, maturation in his writing style that die-hard fans will love and an authentic prelude of international true-to-life projects he hints at in the sequel to For the Love of Money and Flyy Girl. His latest book clearly forewarns his loyal 2 million plus audience and new fans to not take the original writer who began the wave of admiration of urban books for granted. Boss Lady is seasoned with serious high-profile names from all industries, intelligent dialogue between the characters, and witty scenarios that read like movie ready material as Tracy Ellison Grant returns with plans for finally going Hollywood and taking a series of projects to the top like the Flyy Girl movie. The story plot without giving a single clue away, is witty, intelligent and destined to bring success to Omar¿s newest novel on the market. If indeed, Tracy Ellis Grant¿s mission even slightly parallels the true-to-life mission of Omar Tyree, Boss Lady may be one of the first books of its kind to launch an author¿s plans for future projects vicariously through the main character as in Boss Lady and successfully. The author did indeed produce a Flyy Girl Soundtrack, clothing line, and is producing a Flyy Girl; the Urban Statement Magazine. I was able to witness a professional Flyy Girl video shoot, so when I read the book, it was amazing to see how close-to-life the events are to the author¿s host of projects. For now, readers get to sit back and enjoy the trials and tribulations of Tracy Ellis, who this time, holds nothing back, but leaves readers to wonder if at the risk of not finding love and having a family. Too many women of today will be able to relate. The story is told through Vanessa, her cousin and assistant, who has been admonished by her mother for years to not emulate the outgoing Tracy who quit her job as a teacher to become a screenplay writer and publish two poetry books. She hits it big with the production of a first full length motion picture film, but quickly meets several Hollywood men who do not seem to have her best intentions in mind. As she rises to the top, it seems as if her very own cousin may hold the key to helping her Flyy Girl Project launch to success. Boss Lady is crisp, fresh and timeless. Undoubtedly, the book is ready for the big screen, but of course, fans will have to decide. It would be nice to see his international base of fans and supporters at his own debut movie screening in this lifetime for BOSS LADY.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2005

    You're Kidding Right?

    In a nutshell, mediocre writers like Tyree have been touted as so-called 'best-sellers' when they're clearly not. I was extremely disappointed in this book and have become disenchanted with him as an author. True writers take risks, open new doors of thought and offer something new with each and every outing this was more of the same stuff he's been giving us for years and it's time for him to really step out there and lose the commercial-esque fiction that our book club is tired of wasting our money on. Two very big thumbs down.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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