Bottom Line

( 4 )

Overview

Two strong businessmen who run a colossal management consulting and accounting firm find themselves battling one another to save it. One is the founder and a ruthless CEO, the other an idealistic senior executive. They were once as close as father and son, the older man mentor to the younger, but their relationship collapses along with the economy. When the CEO instigates a series of financial crimes, using fraudulent accounting to deceive clients and insider trading to reap millions for himself. When he ...

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Bottom Line

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Overview

Two strong businessmen who run a colossal management consulting and accounting firm find themselves battling one another to save it. One is the founder and a ruthless CEO, the other an idealistic senior executive. They were once as close as father and son, the older man mentor to the younger, but their relationship collapses along with the economy. When the CEO instigates a series of financial crimes, using fraudulent accounting to deceive clients and insider trading to reap millions for himself. When he absconds with millions more from a partners' bonus pool, the younger man hires a private eye to hunt him down.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Nick Blake, a senior managing partner at Martell and Company, a Chicago business consulting firm, is used to giving client execs bad news about their businesses during the recession of 2001. He’s unprepared, however, when founder and megalomaniac CEO Adrian Martell announces drastic cutbacks and retrenchments for Martell. Blake’s job may be in jeopardy after a news leak about the company’s troubles is blamed on his romantic relationship with business reporter Rita Fitzpatrick. The situation turns chaotic when Martell is indicted for insider trader and resigns, and Blake becomes CEO of the troubled company. Martell absconds after cleaning out the partners’ special fund, including million of Blake’s money. This prompts Blake not only to hire a detective but to become one himself. Davis (Dirty Money) provides easy explanations of complex business dealings, while Blake’s persistent pursuit of his one-time mentor leads to foreign adventures before reaching an exciting conclusion in this smartly executed financial thriller. (June)
Kirkus Reviews
Ripped from the business pages, a tale of corporate malfeasance, greed, and, you guessed it, love and forgiveness. Davis has a diverse background. A former commodities broker at the Chicago Board of Trade, a reporter, a former columnist for the Chicago Tribune, an award-winning painter and art teacher, he is the author of children's books and a novel, Dirty Money (1992). Nick Blake is a partner in a prominent consultant and accountancy firm, the fictitious Martell and Company, LLP. He is close to his boss, the egomaniac Adrian Martell, and envied by the other partners, especially Martell's son Billy, who runs the accounting business. Blake has a lover, Rita Fitzpatrick, "ace business reporter and columnist...for the Examiner." When Fitzpatrick's column reports trouble at Martell and Co., suspicion falls, naturally, on Blake. Has he given away the company secrets, whispering sweet nothings in the sack, a fool for lust, or has he been hacked? Then, captain of the industry Martell runs afoul of the SEC and flees with the partners' funds. While the company takes cautious steps, Blake, with the help of PI Ben Cutler, decides to track Martell on his own. As the book begins in March 2001, the reader can expect the events of September of that year to make an appearance; and a needless, gratuitous appearance it is. This sort of story appears with alarming frequency in major newspapers, reported meticulously, discussed dispassionately and without the casual misogyny.
Publishers Weekly
"Davis provides easy explanations of complex business dealings to foreign adventures before reaching an exciting conclusion in this smartly executed financial thriller."
Best-selling author of the Harry Bosch series - Michael Connelly
"Marc Davis has waded into the corporate cosmos and made it understandable, intriguing and fast-paced. I loved this story -- half corporate insider story, half private eye yarn, full on entertainment. I read it start to finish in one sitting."
Gather.com - Shiela Deeth
"By the end of this novel I've realized that, just maybe, some people really are in business for something real, not just fortune or fame. The story's practical depiction of life in the corporate world has flowed into a fast-action drama of humanity too. The mystery's intriguing. The road to its solution is clever. The surprises stick in the memory. And a falling character in a falling world finds his anchor after all."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781579623166
  • Publisher: Permanent Press, The
  • Publication date: 6/28/2013
  • Pages: 248
  • Sales rank: 837,567
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.70 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Marc Davis is a published novelist, former newspaper reporter, an award winning painter and art teacher, former commodity broker at the Chicago Board of Trade, the author of several children's books, and a freelance journalist whose articles have been published in national print and online periodicals and on the Harvard Medical School and Johns Hopkins University consumer websites. His local history column, "Yesterday", ran for more than five years in The Chicago Tribune. His novel, "Dirty Money" was nominated for an award as best novel in its category by the Prvate Eye Writers of America.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2013

    By the end of this novel I¿ve realized that, just maybe, some pe

    By the end of this novel I’ve realized that, just maybe, some people really are in business for something real, not just fortune or fame. The story’s practical depiction of life in the corporate world has flowed into a fast-action drama of humanity too. The mystery’s intriguing. The road to its solution is clever. The surprises stick in the memory. And a falling character in a falling world finds his anchor after all.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 21, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Part corporate drama, part action adventure and private eye inve

    Part corporate drama, part action adventure and private eye investigation, Marc Davis’ Bottom Line is set in the economic downturn of the nineties as businesses collapse and those employed to protect them spend more time determining who should be fired than asking for new hirings. Big boss Adrian has no qualms about sending eight men to do four men’s work, and charging the customer more, but the younger narrator still has some principals, or still thinks he has. Whether those principals will serve to keep Nick in his job or get him fired remains to be seen as the story begins, but soon Nick’s star is rising even as the business splutters and begins its fall. Then everything changes.

    Halfway through the book the story changes gear and an ex-high-flyer wants what’s right. Nick’s lost his girl, his friends, his substitute father, and rather a lot of money. But he’s plenty to spare and when he sets out, almost alone, in search of the thief, it’s clear he can finance his own investigation. Of course, the FBI and SEC are investigating too. And former colleagues have hired a big-league agency to follow the clues. They’re just not quite so good at it.

    Meanwhile, after causing so many business owners to see their own bottom lines, Nick finds himself looking for a measure of his life. Does he want revenge on the one who betrayed him? Is he still searching for a father figure? Is he in the business of making ends meet, of making the flawed meet their ends, or of bringing a meet and just ending to a broken situation? Is money or fame his “bottom line” or is he driven by something else?

    By the end of this novel I’ve realized that, just maybe, some people really are in business for something real, not just fortune or fame. The story’s practical depiction of life in the corporate world has flowed into a fast-action drama of humanity too. The mystery’s intriguing. The road to its solution is clever. The surprises stick in the memory. And a falling character in a falling world finds his anchor after all.

    Disclosure: I was given a free bound galley of this novel by the publisher.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 2, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    In wake of the Bernie Madoff massive fraud upon the world, a nov

    In wake of the Bernie Madoff massive fraud upon the world, a novel (or novels) on questionable business practices could be expected. “Bottom Line” tells a slightly different story of a similar large-scale fraud on a different level: Fraudulent accounting, a violation of securities laws. It is the story of Martell & Co., a top consulting/auditing firm based in Chicago with some of the country’s top companies as clients. With the downturn in the economy, with lower earnings in prospect, the numbers are “massaged” so the stocks of the public companies wouldn’t suffer.

    The plot involves the study of the principal behind the firm, Adrian Martell, and his son, who perpetrate the shenanigans, and Nick Blake, the number two behind them, who plays a vital role in uncovering the scheme. It is an interesting idea, and, for the most part, well executed, except for some minor points about which the author or editor should have known better. Several times, SEC forms are misnamed (K-8 instead of 8K, or K-10 for 10K), and a statement that corporate information would not be released for several months, despite the legal requirement for immediate disclosure of significant news, raising the question as to how expert the author is on the subject. All in all, it is an interesting and fairly good read, despite these misgivings.


    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 21, 2013

    Corporate story line, title gives a strong clue, Nick Blake is w

    Corporate story line, title gives a strong clue, Nick Blake is working for a business consulting firm, led by a self made successful business man with an ego to match his wealth. The relentless pursuit of riches, it's consequences and how it can affect the lives of others is the main theme. Nick ends up playing detective in pursuit of his mentor. It sets off at a good pace, however the steam is running out by the time the book concludes, but still holds my attention to the end. More could have been done by adding some twists and turns making an excellent story rather than just a good one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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