Bouquet [NOOK Book]

Overview

G.B. Stern (1890-1973) was an author, playwright, and a critic whose literary circle included Noel Coward and Rebecca West. Her prose is brilliant, irresistible, hilarious and triumphal as she recounts her 1926 tour of the vineyards of France with her husband Johnny, and her friends Rosemary and Humphrey. Together they journey from Provence to the Rhône, across the Massif Central to Bordeaux, then up to the Loire Valley and across to Burgundy, finally completing a full circle in Avignon. They drink lavishly, eat ...
See more details below
Bouquet

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

G.B. Stern (1890-1973) was an author, playwright, and a critic whose literary circle included Noel Coward and Rebecca West. Her prose is brilliant, irresistible, hilarious and triumphal as she recounts her 1926 tour of the vineyards of France with her husband Johnny, and her friends Rosemary and Humphrey. Together they journey from Provence to the Rhône, across the Massif Central to Bordeaux, then up to the Loire Valley and across to Burgundy, finally completing a full circle in Avignon. They drink lavishly, eat voraciously, and with the requisite courteousness but an utterly addicting eye for the quirks and foibles of their hosts, they visit several of the greatest wineries of France (Chapoutier, Lafite-Rothschild, Margaux, Yquem, Romanée-Conti). Stern does not shy away from the occasional rant, and the one in which she addresses men’s sexism in regards to women and wine, is magnificent.

Bouquet is “a triumphal tour,” read the New York Times book review of July 10, 1927, “and Mrs. Stern has set it down with that happy sense of humor, that perfect eye for the ridiculous and that instinctive understanding of French character that lifts ‘Bouquet’ very far from the usual dry book about wine...”
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Tasting Table - Willy Blackmore
Originally published in 1927, British author G.B. Stern's account of an enviable tour of France's greatest vineyards is still wonderfully fresh. Both breezily conversational and well informed, her unpretentious voice will pull you quickly through the 300-page journey from Hermitage to Médoc to Beaune.
Daily Candy Los Angeles - Steven Casale
Bouquet, by G.B. Stern, an entertaining travelogue of boozy proportions, set in France and unpublished since 1933.
Bottlenotes - Jessica Yadegaran
Stern is sassy and poetic. Think a Flapper-era "Sideways" with a dose of "Thelma & Louise." As they visit awe-inspiring chateaux in Provence, the Rhône, Bordeaux, and Burgundy, Stern and her posse ruminate on everything from sexism and the foibles of the French to the timeless debate over which is the more profound wine, Bordeaux or Burgundy. Stern’s thought-provoking prose is as relevant today as it was 85 years ago.
The Feiring Line - Alice Feiring
In Bouquet, there's little bumbling, but so much discovery and insight into the world of wine as it was and as it always will be. We have here, history and human nature. The Burgundy palate vs. Bordeaux palate, New World vs. Old World remains the same. And so does the thrill of that thing called wine. The weak in the knees feel at the sight of Cote d'Or. It's all there, still.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016286570
  • Publisher: Good Dirt
  • Publication date: 2/19/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Gladys Bronwyn Stern or GB Stern, 1890–1973, born Gladys Bertha Stern in London, England, wrote many novels, short stories, plays, memoirs, biographies and literary criticism.

She wrote her first novel at the age of 20, and then continued to write a novel every year. Her "Rakonitz" novels, e.g. The Rakonitz Chronicles (1932), were based on her cosmopolitan, non-practicing Jewish family. She married New Zealander Geoffrey Lisle Holdsworth in 1919, and sometimes collaborated with him. After World War II she became a Catholic. Her 1938 novel The Ugly Dachshund was made into a film.

With Sheila Kaye-Smith she wrote the dialogues Talking of Jane Austen and More Talk of Jane Austen. She also wrote a biography of Robert Louis Stevenson.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2013

    I was given the beautifully printed hard copy version of this a

    I was given the beautifully printed hard copy version of this a couple months ago (I mean it's really printed with care, heavy paper, silks screened cover, etc...).  As it turns out it was also a brilliant read. G.B. Stern is funny, really funny. It was written in the twenties but it still feels fresh. The wineries they visit are still around. The classics of French cuisine are still around. And the way the French treat tourists is still the way she describes it with such humor. Loved it.   

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)