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A Bowl of Red
     

A Bowl of Red

4.0 1
by Frank X. Tolbert, Hallie Crawford Stillwell (Foreword by)
 

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Big Bend resident rancher Hallie Stillwell has added her voice and favorite chili recipe to her friend Frank X. Tolbert's classic book, A Bowl of Red.

Written by the late Dallas newspaper columnist and author, A Bowl of Red is an entertaining history of the peppery cowboy cuisine. This new printing of the book is based on Tolbert's 1972 revised

Overview


Big Bend resident rancher Hallie Stillwell has added her voice and favorite chili recipe to her friend Frank X. Tolbert's classic book, A Bowl of Red.

Written by the late Dallas newspaper columnist and author, A Bowl of Red is an entertaining history of the peppery cowboy cuisine. This new printing of the book is based on Tolbert's 1972 revised edition, in which he describes the founding of the World Championship Chili Cookoff, now held annually in the ghost town of Terlingua, Texas.

Hallie Stillwell was one of the three judges at the first Terlingua cookoff, held in 1967. "We were blindfolded to sample the chili," the ninety-six-year-old writer/rancher says in her foreword. She voted for one of the milder concoctions; another judge cast his vote for a hotter version. The third judge, who was mayor of Terlingua, sampled each pot but then pronounced his taste buds paralyzed and declared the contest a tie. There's been a "rematch" in Terlingua every November since then. "I have never failed to attend," Stillwell says.

Stillwell's recipe for lean venison chili is her favorite, one she prepared in large quantities for the hungry hands at the Stillwell Ranch in the Big Bend. This new printing of the classic also features an index to other recipes in the book, such as "Beto's prison chili" and chili verde con carne (green chili). The book also includes Tolbert's tales of searching out the best cooks of Southwestern specialties like rattlesnake "stew" and jalapeño corn bread.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A collection of chili essays/recipes originally published by Doubleday in 1972, with a new (2p.) foreword. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781585442096
Publisher:
Texas A&M University Press
Publication date:
12/01/1993
Pages:
200
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author


The late FRANK X. TOLBERT was a Dallas newspaper columnist, novelist, historian, and a co-founder of the World Championship Chili Cookoffs held each November in the Big Bend village of Terlingua. He also founded Tolbert’s Chili Parlor restaurant in Dallas.HALLIE STILLWELL has been a rancher and a fixture in the Big Bend region since 1918. She was a judge at the first Terlingua cookoff in 1967 and is the author of I’ll Gather My Geese.

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A Bowl of Red 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
IlRosso More than 1 year ago
I bought this book after I saw it mentioned on a TV show about chili. The author's daughter now runs a place that is famous for her chili and she wouldn't tell how she made it. The commentator said that it didn't matter because her father had given the secret recipe in this book. I found that it was, fortunately, still in print. This is NOT a cookbook but it does have a number of recipes. It starts out with the history of chili as a dish and then moves into a couple chapters about the origins of chili cook-offs. The title is a bit of a misnomer because, somewhere along the way, the author decided to also talk about other favorite southwestern dishes. In all, there are 12 chili recipes including Chili Verde as well as the red chili dishes and recipes for cornbread with jalapenos, sourdough biscuits, black eyed peas, pinto beans, a couple stews, hominy, tamales and even rattlesnake. The recipe index added by Hallie Stillwell was a great idea. I tried a couple of the chili recipes and liked the result. Note: most of the chili recipes are Texas style meaning that they have no beans. The first chili cook-offs came about because another journalist claimed Texans didn't know how to make chili because "real" chili included beans. That's how much of a "hot button" the issue of beans in chili can be! The "problem" with this book is that it's out of date in terms of restaurants. The author mentions a lot of places for great simple food like chili, sausages, and barbecue. Unfortunately, most or all of those places have closed, changed hands or moved. So, you couldn't use this book to find a good place to eat when you're in that part of Texas. But, we've got the internet to help with that kind of info so don't hold back because the author's favorite places have closed! And, if you don't want to make your own chili or you prefer using a chili powder mix to make chili, he's got you covered with chapters about canned chili and chili powders. Personally, I like to try different types of chili pods to modify flavor and heat levels so I don't normally use chili powder mixes because they generally use only ancho chili powder in the mix. I generally use the powder mixes only when cooking for a party or pot luck meal where I have to consider what people who aren't "chili heads" would like. And, I dodge the bean issue by serving, alongside the chili, pinto beans that were cooked with chili pods, onions, garlic and the same spices I used for the chili. Those that want chili with beans can mix them into their bowl. Those who prefer Texas style chili can have the beans as a side dish or skip them altogether.