Bowling Green Since 1950, Kentucky (Images of America Series)

Bowling Green Since 1950, Kentucky (Images of America Series)

5.0 2
by Amy Hughes Wood, Portia Beck Pennington
     
 

The last 50 years of the millennium brought changes no oracle could have foreseen. In 1950, most families did not own a television set, many did not own a car, and most women did not drive. Segregation was practiced throughout the country, while Americans lived in the shadows of the cold war and nuclear proliferation. Bowling Green in 1950 was a microcosm of

Overview


The last 50 years of the millennium brought changes no oracle could have foreseen. In 1950, most families did not own a television set, many did not own a car, and most women did not drive. Segregation was practiced throughout the country, while Americans lived in the shadows of the cold war and nuclear proliferation. Bowling Green in 1950 was a microcosm of America at large. Ladies wore hats and gloves; men wore hats and ties. Businesses prospered and failed, schools were built and students were graduated, political issues were debated, and churches were erected. Bowling Green was Our Town, U.S.A.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780738566771
Publisher:
Arcadia Publishing SC
Publication date:
03/22/2010
Series:
Images of America Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author


Photographer Tommy Hughes captured Bowling Green with the unique perspective of a citizen who dedicated over 50 years to creating images of the town and its people. Authors Amy Hughes Wood and Portia Beck Pennington have compiled a collection that showcases Hughes’s photographic skills and chronicles the developments of a small town coming of age in a postwar world, from the 1950s era of soda shops and railroad travel to the dawn of the computer age.

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Bowling Green Since 1950, Kentucky (Images of America Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This collection of well-identified photos is not just splendid collection of period snapshots but a fitting memorial to the outstanding camera man who took them. They are well-organized and the captions are appropriate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago