Boy Genius

Overview


[Put this wording in a box, along with the series logo – on zip] The latest installment in the Akashic Urban Surreal series.

Boy Genius is a powerful identity satire, the picaresque odyssey of a child seeking to avenge the wrongs perpetrated on his parents. Park’s genius, born into the turmoil of post-war Korea, is used as a puppet by the South Korean government—before being banished to America. From a remote New York city ghetto, the boy wages a clandestine guerilla war against all symbols of authority. Park ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $51.43   
  • New (2) from $431.19   
  • Used (3) from $51.43   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$431.19
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(5876)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new book. We Pack Carefully and Ship Daily!

Ships from: Miamisburg, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


[Put this wording in a box, along with the series logo – on zip] The latest installment in the Akashic Urban Surreal series.

Boy Genius is a powerful identity satire, the picaresque odyssey of a child seeking to avenge the wrongs perpetrated on his parents. Park’s genius, born into the turmoil of post-war Korea, is used as a puppet by the South Korean government—before being banished to America. From a remote New York city ghetto, the boy wages a clandestine guerilla war against all symbols of authority. Park renders his vision of late-20th-century global culture with the bold, surreal strokes of Pynchon and the wild political sensibilities of Godard; the painful, largely unmapped narrative territory of Boy Genius creates a gripping, harrowing read.

Yongsoo Park is a Korean-American writer and independent film-maker living in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Filmmaker Yonsoo Park's debut, Boy Genius, follows the life of its eponymous protagonist through a surreal stew of politics, betrayal, race and identity. BG falls from grace as a state-sponsored child TV star in Korea and heads to America with his parents. He spends his adolescence rebelling against his teachers in a teeming East Coast slum; when his parents are killed, he heads to California, where surgery transforms him into a Caucasian. Fraught with bizarre plot twists and impossible coincidences, Park's unique characters inhabit a dark, violent and paranoid world in which nothing and no one is as it appears. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A Korean-born filmmaker's often surreal debut features a search for revenge by a character who, as a boy in South Korea, was raised from obscurity to national prominence with his own TV show-only to be thrown, along with his family, back into poverty. Known as Boy Genius while his show is on, the lad sings the praises of all-powerful President Park, lending his intelligence to the rooting out of the Communist menace by fair means or foul, until Park's wife is assassinated. Then, swiftly thrust from the limelight and denied the perks of celebrity, Boy Genius and his parents end up in squalor. With no explanation forthcoming and a fresh face taking his place on the show, he decides to emigrate and take his parents with him. The relocation brings them to a Third World-like slum in New York City, where Boy Genius first joins a pack of wild dogs on the streets, then goes to school-where his bitter refusal to spout melting-pot rhetoric puts him in solitary confinement until his spirit is broken. He signs an accord signaling his compliance, whereupon his parents are butchered at home by persons unknown. Boy Genius finishes school and gets a job in LA; but, realizing that he'll never find success looking like a Korean, he locates a doctor in Hiroshima who turns him into a Caucasian. Following this miracle, he makes great strides up the ladder of success, marrying another transformed Asian and buying a house in a white neighborhood. But then he learns that President Park and his goons were responsible for his parents'death. His drive for vengeance takes him into dangerous territory, leading him to his own death-but Boy Genius doesn't stop even there. Park is clever and caustic in depictingAmerica's treatment of its minority underclass, but his story's heavy reliance on caricature and the bizarre taps its strength.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781888451245
  • Publisher: Akashic Books
  • Publication date: 2/1/2002
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 300
  • Product dimensions: 4.60 (w) x 7.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author


Yongsoo Park is a novelist, filmmaker and playwright. His debut novel BOY GENIUS was recognized as a Notable Title for the 2002 Kiriyama Book Prize and as a finalist for the 2003 Asian American Literary Awards. A former Van Lier Fellowship winner at the Asian American Writers? Workshop, Park was born in South Korea and now lives in Harlem with his wife.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 20, 2010

    Quirky, fun, and kept me on my toes!

    I friend borrowed this book to me, but I loved it so much that I bought my own copy and just gifted another to a family member. Weird, crisp, bizarre, and occasional random, but it all comes together by the end of the book. It's hard to describe, so I won't try, but if you like The Simpsons, Garrison Keillor, and Charles Dickens (I know, I know...), then you might find this a terrific read. Truly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2004

    Two thumbs up

    Although I probably read more than the average person, I've never written a review before and in fact I avoid reading them in general, particularly before picking up the book or seeing the movie upon which a review is based. I just finished 2 of this author's books, 'Las Cucarachas' and 'Boy Genius,' and out of curiosity I decided to read what others had to say. Interestingly, many of the reviewers take time comparing this book to other books. I'm going to frankly describe what I myself thought rather than make these comparisons. First of all, both of this author's books are worth reading, and they should be read as a pair. I would recommend reading 'Las Cucarachas' and then 'Boy Genius,' in that order. I was born and raised in New York City, and I'm from approximately the same generation as the main character in 'Las Cucarachas;' to me it's incredible how well the author brings to life what my own childhood was like, growing up and hanging out in the streets of New York- not desperately poor, but poor enough so that the kids from what was called the 'middle class' seemed rich by comparison, and were luckier than any of them ever seemed able to see. It's as though the author lived this NYC childhood, with all its obstacles, frustrations and pains, freeze dried it, moved on in his own life, and then went back to it and set it down exactly, precisely, missing nothing, not a single thought, feeling, experience or idea. You read 'Las Cucarachas' and you experience the raw, real life of a tough, smart street kid in a big city where money is everything- absolutely, totally everything- and where the kid knows that it's not that society wants him to fail; rather, society is so completely and profoundly indifferent that it can't even be bothered to have an interest in his success or failure either way. Nobody from any middle or upper class background can ever truly know the alienation this situation creates, but by reading 'Las Cucarachas' they can sure get a good goddamn taste of it. 'Las Cucarachas' is the story of a boy that's forced to gear everything around slickness and toughness, and who's trying to make something happen against impossible odds and what seems like an endless stream of jerks and idiots holding him back and getting in his way. When I finished reading 'Las Cucarachas' I felt a strange urge to contact the author, congratulate him for making it through, and thank him for creating such an honest, vivid, and truly touching testimonial to youth. 'Boy Genius' should be read after 'Las Cucarachas;' in fact it's remarkable to me that 'Boy Genius' was actually written by the same author. 'Boy Genius' is so completely different, and not just the subject matter, but the whole style of the book as well. 'Las Cucarachas' is raw and gritty; 'Boy Genius' begins right off the bat with fantastic events that continue unfolding throughout. The narrator in 'Boy Genius' gets you to suspend your disbelief so completely that I myself often looked up from the book while reading and felt an embarrassed smile on my face, as though realizing once again that I was the victim of this author's ongoing, intelligent, playful mischief. Bringing this together- the surreal storyline, the narrator's ever present, eccentric, hilarious and intelligent take on things- and you've got a book, 'Boy Genius,' that once again is not only wonderful, honest and real, but that's also simply enjoyable to read... and that's something that's important to me for any book that I pick up! I'm still a New Yorker, and I know I've got a book I love when I can take that book onto a crowded train during rush hour on my way to work- and lose myself in it totally and completely, in spite of the fact that I'm being jostled and crushed by stressed and impatient New Yorkers who'd prefer I put the book away, hold onto the handra

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2002

    run on Boy Genius!

    Reading the jacket of the book, i was like, "what the hell is this about?" But Yongsoo Park totally blurs the lines between reality and myth. While the tale of Boy Genius is written with such fantastic fairy tale imagination, Park fills the story with references and truths of our society. The tale of Boy Genius takes you on his full journey from child to adulthood, and his quest for revenge. I'm a slow reader, but I blazed through this book in a few days, such an enjoyable read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)