Boy Proof

( 26 )

Overview

"This novel's funny first-person narrative will grab teens (and not just sci-fi fans) with its romance and the screwball special effects." — BOOKLIST

An AMERICAN BOOKSELLER "Pick of the Lists" Selection

A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age

A PUBLISHERS WEEKLY "Flying Start" Selection

"Egg's journey to shed her trappings and to confidently inhabit her own character is one readers won't want to miss."...

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Overview

"This novel's funny first-person narrative will grab teens (and not just sci-fi fans) with its romance and the screwball special effects." — BOOKLIST

An AMERICAN BOOKSELLER "Pick of the Lists" Selection

A New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age

A PUBLISHERS WEEKLY "Flying Start" Selection

"Egg's journey to shed her trappings and to confidently inhabit her own character is one readers won't want to miss." — PUBLISHERS WEEKLY (starred review)

"Castellucci's brooding, smart, self-confident narrator gives a . . . warts-and-all glimpse into Hollywood." — THE HORN BOOK

"A fresh voice that will be immediately appealing to readers."
— Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Victoria — aka Egg — may be boy proof, but readers will find Cecil Castellucci's fully-inhabited narrator irresistible. A prayer for the wayward, Boy Proof is witty, tender-hearted and compulsively readable." — Ron Koertge, author of STONER & SPAZ — Ron Koertge
Publishers Weekly
A smart and happily "boy proof" teen changes her outlook after meeting new classmate Max Carter. PW wrote in a starred review, "The heroine's journey to shed her trappings and to confidently inhabit her own character is one readers won't want to miss." Ages 14-up. (Sept.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Leslie Wolfson
Sci-fi geek Victoria—who calls herself "Egg" after her favorite futuristic movie character—has no friends. Actually, she has friends but decides she does not need them. She goes through her daily existence shunning anyone who tries to be friendly towards her, including the talented new kid at school, Max. Egg looks as weird as she acts: multiple rings through her ears, shaved head, colored-in eyebrows, and pale skin. She dresses in her heroine's long, white cloak and imagines herself as an independent force against the world. Despite fancying herself an outsider, Egg is not a stereotype. She is a straight-A student (except for that pesky calculus!) and is vying to be valedictorian of her senior class. She is also the star photographer on her school newspaper and a member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy club. While disdaining everyone else as beneath her, she secretly covets Max, son of a documentary filmmaker and a talented artist in his own right. Before her eyes, she watches her anti-social behavior backfire when Max, who has been flirting with her, starts dating the newspaper's editor, and her former friends, tired of her attitude, ignore her. By the end of the book, Egg makes a transformation back into Victoria and learns a valuable lesson about the importance of friendship and being true to oneself. This entertaining novel will appeal to anyone who has felt like an outsider, and Egg/Victoria's strong voice adds to the pleasure.
KLIATT - Claire Rosser
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, March 2005: Castellucci is a filmmaker, an actress, and a singer-songwriter. She lives in Hollywood, and this, her first novel, is set there. It's wonderfully quirky, as is the main character, Victoria, aka Egg. Victoria's mother is a beautiful actress, and her father is a successful makeup artist—he's an Oscar winner who designs monsters, dragons, vampire bats and all those good things. Victoria's parents are divorced and Victoria is living unhappily with her mother. She feels most comfortable visiting her father's workshop. The story is basically a school story, a first-love story, but with unusual characters—the artistic, intellectual geeks who rarely get attention in YA novels. Victoria hides behind the identity of a character in a favorite SF film—Egg. She goes to school in costume, with a shaved head and painted-on eyebrows. She is a senior, anxious to get out of high school as the valedictorian and off to college in the coming year. Her confidence and swagger bump up against a new boy who is as smart as she is, and attractive—oh, and she starts falling behind in trigonometry and has to ask for help from an acquaintance—that hurts. This is funny, in an offbeat sort of way. Few readers will be as smart and talented as Victoria, and few will share her incredible life experiences as a child of Hollywood, but most will enjoy reading about her woes and triumphs. Max, the new student, is a worthy adversary—a creator of graphic novels, a brilliant student, the son of a famous documentary filmmaker who has lived all over the world. Of course, eventually Max and Victoria become friends, with a promise of aromantic future relationship. They deserve each other. (There are sprinkles of obscenities here and there, which make Victoria's sarcasm realistic.) (An ALA Best Book for YAs.)
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-Victoria, 16, considers herself boy proof-too smart and tough to be appealing to guys. She has renamed herself Egg after her favorite character in a new science-fiction blockbuster, and even dresses like her idol, wearing an all-white cloak. A straight-A student, she dominates classroom discussions and considers no one her friend. The teen spends Tuesdays after school happily sculpting movie monsters with her work-obsessed father, a special-effects guru, and devotes the rest of her free time to squabbling with her actor mother and debating with and disdaining the Science Fiction and Fantasy Club. When Max Carter arrives at Melrose Prep, he is the first person to see past her aggressive exterior. Chaos follows this disruption; soon her grades are falling, she's called to meetings with the dean of students, and she starts to think about Max in exciting and disturbing ways. Some of the dialogue is a bit unbelievable. Victoria, in particular, strains credibility-she alternates between acting tough and being immature. It's hard to think of her as supersharp because of some of the silly things she says. The pacing is uneven as well; Max and Victoria's relationship blossoms with little development. Victoria's growth is the book's real strength. This is a busy first novel whose secondary characters often outshine the protagonist. Still, lonely, overachieving girls may find themselves cheering for Victoria.-Sarah Couri, New York Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This character study of a rebellious Los Angeles teen has enough quirky features taken from sci-fi fantasy to keep reluctant readers interested. Victoria Jurgen devotes herself to science fiction and has retreated from society. She refuses to answer to her name, instead calling herself "Egg," after a character in her favorite sci-fi movie. Her major goals are to become valedictorian of her high school and to be eccentric. Egg reluctantly finds herself attracted to Max, a new boy in her school, but she's so devoted to her own separateness that, although she befriends him, she refuses to respond to his approaches. When Max gets involved with a girl she dislikes, however, Egg becomes jealous. Then her grades slip, and she meets and dislikes her favorite actress, which helps to repel her from her former obsessions and solitude. It's an unusual, successful, appealing effort from first-time novelist Castellucci. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763627966
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 8/8/2006
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 169,613
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.63 (w) x 7.85 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Cecil Castellucci grew up in New York City. She is a writer, a filmmaker, an actress, and a singer-songwriter, and engages in many other creative pursuits. She is also an avid science fiction fan: as a testament to her devotion, she lived for six weeks on Hollywood Boulevard, waiting for the opening of STAR WARS: EPISODE ONE. "Sci-fi fandom is always given such a bad rap," she says. "I'm a card-carrying geek and proud of it." Currently, Cecil Castellucci lives in Los Angeles, in the "belly of the beast" known as Hollywood. This is her first book with Candlewick Press.
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Read an Excerpt

I slide my eyes over to the girls who know how to stand nonchalantly in underwear, just chatting. The group includes Nelly and Inez. Nelly's leg is up on the bench between the lockers and she is rubbing glitter lotion onto her calves.

How did girls like that become so comfortable with their bodies? How did I miss out on that lesson?

I am uncomfortable in this body.

I cannot wear a cute tank top with confidence.

I listen like a fly on the wall. It doesn't matter to them that I'm there. Because I'm the Invisible Girl.

"Well, I think Max Carter is cute," Nelly says. "There's just something about him."

"Yeah, but he's always got his nose in that little sketchbook. It's kind of creepy," Inez says while fixing the braids in her hair.

"It's not creepy. It's mysterious. He's totally driven," Nelly says. "He's really smart and cultured. He's so not a boy."

I suck my lips in and mock her to myself.

"Maybe you should ask him out," another girl says.

"Yeah, maybe I should. I love talking to him. He's so deep."

The lockers slam shut, and the voices echo down the hallway to the door to the gym until it's just me and the tick of the large caged clock.

I smart a little. A pinprick. I'm used to envy, but this pain is different.

Max Carter doesn't have deep conversations only with me.

__________________
BOY PROOF by Cecil Castellucci. Copyright (c) 2005 by Cecil Castellucci. Published by Candlewick Press, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 12, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Boy Proof you can only hope so..

    Egg is such a fun silly character I loved her to death. I am not the person who usually likes people obsessed with Sci-Fi since my brother is one but her character is just so original, unique, and odd I felt like we could be friends and laugh at the people always trying to fit in. She is the type of person you would want for a friend. The plot also has such deep struggles that every person over 18 has gone through in their life. Just from the title you know this book is going to be about a boy but this story takes such a twist around that, that it is almost comical in the end when you realize she and the guy did end up together because for a while it doesn't look like they will even though the characters so perfect for each other. A very good teen book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2008

    wow...thats all i can say....

    i loved this book its funny intersting and its what the real world is all about i read it in 2 hours it was so good cant wait to read more of her books!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2007

    What About 'boy proof'?

    This book 'boy proof', wasa book that i really liked. 'boy proof' will probobly never be read by a boy because, well just look at the title, 'boy proof'. This book is only for girls!! Here is why. This book is about a girl named Victoria, but hates her name! She loves being called egg because her favorite star is called egg. She does everything egg does including being 'boy proof'! One day a new kid comes into school and his name is Max. He is totally not popular because he's stinky, has bad breath, and has really bad dandruff. Apparently he has a little crush on Victoria 'egg'. Does Victoria 'egg' like him back? Will Victoria stick with eggs everymove and stay 'boy proof'? Read the book and find out! You wont regret it!! I liked this book because of the plot. I just loved the how Victoria acted in the story. She was bossy and a little crazy! I loved the plot in this book/story.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2006

    good book

    I checked this book out at my library just as one of those 'well i need a book fast' kinda things and I read it within a day. The sci-fi thing got me nervous at the beginning but there wasn't a whole lot of sci-fi at all. It was a really good book that i think a lot of teenagers who are trying to find themselves can relate to.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2014

    Poorly written, cliche

    This book is written as if its target audience is a second-grader, but the characters are high school-aged and there is some cursing. Most of the dialogue seems fake, and it is simply unbearable when the main character attempts to be "deep." The pacing is odd, and i had to reread several parts to make sure I hadn't skipped anything. Overall, definitely not worth your eight dollars.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2013

    Loved it

    The title exposes a relationship that is going to take place and the story is a different journey of a love story that u could never imagine

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2012

    Ehhh

    This book wasn't too great... there was way too much cussing. The plotline was alright, and I think the ending could have used a little bit more work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Mickie

    Bluegrass state of mind

    So it is easier to talk to u umder the book that i am reading

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  • Posted February 27, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    from missprint.wordpress.com

    Cecil Castellucci's first novel for young adults was released in 2005. Since then Boy Proof has received a wide variety of accolades including selection as a Booksense 76 Children's Pick, BBYA 2006 and a Quick Picks for Reluctant Readers by the American Library Association (ALA). Happily, Ms. Castellucci has continued to write teen books as well as graphic novels targeted at teens. There are a lot of books (and television adaptations) out there that detail the lifestyles of the young and beautiful people. Boy Proof offers something slightly different.

    Victoria Jurgen, narrator of Boy Proof, would be the first to tell you that she is not beautiful (although she is young having skipped a grade she is a sixteen-year-old high school senior). Preferring the world of sci-fi movies for which her dad designs special effects and makeup, Victoria made a conscious choice to reinvent herself as her favorite character from "Terminal Earth." Victoria is, therefore, no longer Victoria but Egg. She wears a cloak, has shaved her head as well as her eyebrows which she colors with orange makeup, and is determined to keep everyone at bay--no matter how much they might want to be friends, especially boys. In other words, Egg has worked to make herself boy proof.

    At least, she thought she had until Max Carter starts at her school. In many ways, Max is the perfect counterpart to Egg, sharing her interest in the film industry (and sci-fi movies) as well as art, and acting as a good foil to her banter. But the harder Max tries to break into Egg's world, the harder she fights back. When Max starts dating a less boy proof (and more boring) girl, and Egg's own people--the members of her school's sci-fi club--forsake her, Egg begins to realize that maybe being boy proof isn't all it's cracked up to be. But after trying so hard to keep herself apart from, well, everyone, Egg has to think long and hard about how to get back in and what that might mean for a self-made loner.

    I love this book. It's one of the first I ever read that was written in the present tense which, at the time, seemed very original indeed (less so currently I muse admit) and made the narrative really grab readers' attention. This novel is really something unique, Egg lives a fairly privileged life being the daughter of a famous actress and a special effects guru but instead of stopping there, Boy Proof really focuses on Egg and her interactions with people. Castellucci's writing is excellent here creating a funny and compelling voice for Egg as well as a really enjoyable book.

    Many other reviewers have said this novel is great for people who want to embrace their inner-geek, loners, and even tough girls. I'd go a step further: Boy Proof is a great book for readers trying to find themselves--even if they think they've already done that.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 26, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Karin Perry for TeensReadToo.com

    Victoria "Egg" Jurgen is a loner and she likes it that way. Dressed in her long white cloak, with a shaved head and drawn-in eyebrows, she doesn't talk to people and doesn't want people to talk to her. Her look and attitude cause her to be "boy proof," according to her mother. Egg's unique style is fashioned after her favorite character from the movie Terminal Earth, which she has seen multiple times and as many as four times in one day. Egg refers to herself as a cinephile. She loves the film industry, especially the Sci-Fi world. <BR/><BR/>Egg considers herself the smartest person at her school and feels Valedictorian is pretty much in the bag. That is until Max shows up in her AP classes. Egg's first impression of Max is that he stinks, literally. The only thing she likes about him at all is his t-shirt that has the name of one of her favorite comic books on it. Max seems to be everywhere. He is a wonderful artist and joins the school's newspaper where Egg acts as a photo journalist. Getting to know Max turns out to be a life-changing experience for Egg. <BR/><BR/>As senior year progresses, Egg becomes more involved in activities that put her in contact with people. She learns what it means to be a friend and how important it is to have them in your life. She realizes that people aren't always as they seem and that being perfect isn't necessary for happiness. Egg learns a lot in one year's time; even how to leave Egg behind and become simply Victoria. <BR/><BR/>Cecil Castellucci has written a thoughtful story about the sensitive time in every young adult's life - self-discovery. Written in first person, this novel launches you into Egg's world and leaves you feeling as though you are experiencing life through her eyes. The reader will sympathize with the ups and downs of the typical teenage angst that Victoria goes through in order to, once and for all, decide what it really takes for her to be happy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2007

    a reviewer

    Victoria ¿Egg¿ Jurgen is a loner and she likes it that way. Dressed in her long white cloak, with a shaved head and drawn-in eyebrows, she doesn¿t talk to people and doesn¿t want people to talk to her. Her look and attitude cause her to be 'boy proof,' according to her mother. Egg¿s unique style is fashioned after her favorite character from the movie Terminal Earth, which she has seen multiple times and as many as four times in one day. Egg refers to herself as a cinephile. She loves the film industry, especially the Sci-Fi world. Egg considers herself the smartest person at her school and feels Valedictorian is pretty much in the bag. That is until Max shows up in her AP classes. Egg¿s first impression of Max is that he stinks, literally. The only thing she likes about him at all is his t-shirt that has the name of one of her favorite comic books on it. Max seems to be everywhere. He is a wonderful artist and joins the school¿s newspaper where Egg acts as a photo journalist. Getting to know Max turns out to be a life-changing experience for Egg. As senior year progresses, Egg becomes more involved in activities that put her in contact with people. She learns what it means to be a friend and how important it is to have them in your life. She realizes that people aren¿t always as they seem and that being perfect isn¿t necessary for happiness. Egg learns a lot in one year¿s time even how to leave Egg behind and become simply Victoria. Cecil Castellucci has written a thoughtful story about the sensitive time in every young adult¿s life ¿ self-discovery. Written in first person, this novel launches you into Egg's world and leaves you feeling as though you are experiencing life through her eyes. The reader will sympathize with the ups and downs of the typical teenage angst that Victoria goes through in order to, once and for all, decide what it really takes for her to be happy. **Reviewed by: Karin Perry

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2007

    A reviewer

    I got this book from the libary, after reading the frist 20 pages, i took me 3 times of looking (and reading) it, for me to chech it out because of the sci-fi thing it didn't look all that great, But once i checked it out i read it in a day. This is a great book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2006

    Loved it

    I really enjoyed this book . It took me ON a little journey . I love Wow you she was so weird .

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2005

    this is a very good book

    i loved this book!! it took me a little time to understand but, the ending was so sweet. I wished they make a part 2

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2005

    1st

    I'm the first reviewer!! No, I really did like this book. It took forever for me to get it though. Because I saw it at target, but we had to leave. So I requested at the library, and they had to get it mailed in, so it took me forever, but I really enjoyed it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted March 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted October 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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