The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter

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Overview

How does a teacher begin to appreciate and tap the rich creative resources of the fantasy world of children? What social functions do story playing and storytelling serve in the preschool classroom? And how can the child who is trapped in private fantasies be brought into the richly imaginative social play that surrounds him?

The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter focuses on the challenge posed by the isolated child to teachers and classmates alike in the unique community of the classroom. It is the dramatic story of Jason-the loner and outsider-and of his ultimate triumph and homecoming into the society of his classmates. As we follow Jason's struggle, we see that the classroom is indeed the crucible within which the young discover themselves and learn to confront new problems in their daily experience.

Vivian Paley recreates the stage upon which children emerge as natural and ingenious storytellers. She supplements these real-life vignettes with brilliant insights into the teaching process, offering detailed discussions about control, authority, and the misuse of punishment in the preschool classroom. She shows a more effective and natural dynamic of limit-setting that emerges in the control children exert over their own fantasies. And here for the first time the author introduces a triumvirate of teachers (Paley herself and two apprentices) who reflect on the meaning of events unfolding before them.

The dramatic story of Jason--the loner and the outsider--and his struggle to be accepted into the society of his classmates, The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter shows that the classrom is indeed the crucible within which the young discover themselves and learn to confront new problems. "Anyone who was once a child, and especially those who were helicopters, will enjoy it."--David Perkins, Kansas City Star.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review

The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter is, among other things, an original essay on the practice of teaching young children...Vivian Paley's innovation is her use of children's stories as a vehicle of instruction...Paley is an artist whose medium is children in the classroom. The end product of her year's work is a group of children who can live comfortably with themselves and with one another. This group of children will soon scatter. But each child will always carry a bit of Vivian Paley along with him or her, and that is the way in which a gifted teacher's art lives on.
— David Elkind

Times Educational Supplement

For those interested in...the education of the spirit, this is finally a heartening and challenging book.
— Geoff Fox

Chicago Tribune

A tour de force...Years from now we may know the fruit of the trees Vivian Paley and her associates have planted. It will be easy, then, to recognize her former students. When asked to recall their kindergarten experiences, they surely will begin with the words, "Once upon a time..."
— Thomas J. Cottle

Kansas City Star

There are many funny moments...[and] an attractive humility in Paley's work...Anyone who was once a child, and especially those who were once helicopters, will enjoy it.
— David Perkins

Choice

Humanity, wisdom, and understanding are the words that come to mind when reading Paley's latest book. She offers a view into the world of children that is respectful of their strengths and complexity...This book shines with an authenticity that comes from the voice of the teacher, not the observer...[It] should be required reading for all those working with children of any age. They and other readers will find it an absorbing and enlightening experience.
— S. Sugarman

New York Times Book Review - David Elkind
The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter is, among other things, an original essay on the practice of teaching young children...Vivian Paley's innovation is her use of children's stories as a vehicle of instruction...Paley is an artist whose medium is children in the classroom. The end product of her year's work is a group of children who can live comfortably with themselves and with one another. This group of children will soon scatter. But each child will always carry a bit of Vivian Paley along with him or her, and that is the way in which a gifted teacher's art lives on.
Times Educational Supplement - Geoff Fox
For those interested in...the education of the spirit, this is finally a heartening and challenging book.
Chicago Tribune - Thomas J. Cottle
A tour de force...Years from now we may know the fruit of the trees Vivian Paley and her associates have planted. It will be easy, then, to recognize her former students. When asked to recall their kindergarten experiences, they surely will begin with the words, "Once upon a time..."
Kansas City Star - David Perkins
There are many funny moments...[and] an attractive humility in Paley's work...Anyone who was once a child, and especially those who were once helicopters, will enjoy it.
Choice - S. Sugarman
Humanity, wisdom, and understanding are the words that come to mind when reading Paley's latest book. She offers a view into the world of children that is respectful of their strengths and complexity...This book shines with an authenticity that comes from the voice of the teacher, not the observer...[It] should be required reading for all those working with children of any age. They and other readers will find it an absorbing and enlightening experience.
Chicago Tribune
A tour de force...Years from now we may know the fruit of the trees Vivian Paley and her associates have planted. It will be easy, then, to recognize her former students. When asked to recall their kindergarten experiences, they surely will begin with the words, "Once upon a time..."
— Thomas J. Cottle
Kansas City Star
There are many funny moments...[and] an attractive humility in Paley's work...Anyone who was once a child, and especially those who were once helicopters, will enjoy it.
— David Perkins
Choice
Humanity, wisdom, and understanding are the words that come to mind when reading Paley's latest book. She offers a view into the world of children that is respectful of their strengths and complexity...This book shines with an authenticity that comes from the voice of the teacher, not the observer...[It] should be required reading for all those working with children of any age. They and other readers will find it an absorbing and enlightening experience.
— S. Sugarman
New York Times Book Review
The Boy Who Would Be a Helicopter is, among other things, an original essay on the practice of teaching young children...Vivian Paley's innovation is her use of children's stories as a vehicle of instruction...Paley is an artist whose medium is children in the classroom. The end product of her year's work is a group of children who can live comfortably with themselves and with one another. This group of children will soon scatter. But each child will always carry a bit of Vivian Paley along with him or her, and that is the way in which a gifted teacher's art lives on.
— David Elkind
Times Educational Supplement
For those interested in...the education of the spirit, this is finally a heartening and challenging book.
— Geoff Fox
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674080317
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/1991
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 138,999
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Vivian Gussin Paley, a former kindergarten teacher, is the winner of a MacArthur Award and of the 1998 American Book Award for Lifetime Achievement given by the Before Columbus Foundation.
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Table of Contents

Foreword by Robert Coles

Preface

Storytellers and Story Players

Teacher and Theory-Maker

Jason's Story

New Questions

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2004

    Good Read For Preschool Teachers/Caregivers

    I really enjoyed reading this book and I feel that there were many lessons that one could learn from this teacher and her students. This book helped me to better understand what the children I work with are thinking and feeling. I found many parallels between myself and this teacher. I enjoyed reading about her thoughts and discoveries. I would recommend this book to anyone who works with young children. It really can open your eyes to a whole new world!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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